8/2 Split Experts?

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Driver's Comment
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So, I have been driving for a year and a half and recently discovered the 8/2 split using my electronic logs. I must say it is a powerful tool because I can start my driving after 8hrs without waiting the full 10hrs. I am not sure how it all is calculated or works, so here is my example:

I drove yesterday starting with 8/2 split. Last night arrived at rest area with 6 minutes of drive time. This morning after 8 hours of sleeper, I received 48 minutes driving and 1hr 36 min(or close to it..did not write it down) on 14hr on duty.

I drove 39 minutes to truck stop, so now have 9 minutes driving left and my 14hr is used up. I'm at truck stop now.

A few questions:

1, How was the 48 minutes calculated? Is it 6 minutes from last night x 8? Is the 1hr 36 minutes double drive to calculate 14hr?

2. Do I need to take the 2 hrs straight? Or cane I take 1 hr off duty drive a few minutes, then take another 1 hr off?

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Sambo's Comment
member avatar

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the 8/2 is fairly straight forward. You can get your 10 hours off in 2 shifts, one has to be 2 hours, the other has to be 8. Of I'm not mistaken, the 8 hours HAS to be taken in the sleeper berth.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the 8/2 is fairly straight forward. You can get your 10 hours off in 2 shifts, one has to be 2 hours, the other has to be 8. Of I'm not mistaken, the 8 hours HAS to be taken in the sleeper berth.

If only it was straight forward lol.

Say you start with a 10 hr break to make things simple. 30 min pretrip, drive 4, hrs, then off duty for 2 hrs. Then drive 7 more hours and do a 30 min post trip (nobody does a 30, minute post trip but I'm trying to make this simple). You have used exactly 14 hours of your 14-hr clock and all 11 hours of drive time since you started your "day."

Now take 8 hrs in the sleeper birth. What do you get back? You get the full 11 and 14 minus whatever you used in between the end of the 2 hr break and the beginning of the 8 hr SB period. I'll do each clock separately:

14 hr clock: since the end of the 2 hr break, you used 7.5 hours of 14 hr clock. (7 hrs of drive time plus the 30 minutes on duty at the end. If you had taken 15, minutes off duty somewhere in there and only done a 15 minute post trip you still would have used 7.5 hrs off that clock since it counts down regardless of what you're doing.) So you get back 14 - 7.5 = 6.5 hours on your 14

11 hr clock: same thing. In between the 2 hrs off and the 8 hrs in the sleeper, you used 7 hrs of driving. So you get back 11 - 7 = 4 hours on your 11 hr clock.

Ok cool, so you do another 30 minute pretrip and drive your 4 hrs nonstop because your an efficient little ******* who doesn't like to take any unnecessary breaks. Now you stop for 2 hrs. Again, you get back the full 11 and 14 hrs minus whatever you used between the end of the 8 hr break and the beginning of the 2 hr break. Well, sort of--unless you take a full 8 hrs in the sleeper your 14, keeps counting down. Here you go:

14 hr clock: You used 30 min + 4 hrs + 2 hrs (that break you just took) = 6.5 hrs. So you get back 14 - 6.5 = 7.5 hrs.

11 hr clock: You used 4 hrs so you get back 11 - 4 = 7 hrs back on your 11.

Pretty cool huh?

Some things to keep in mind:

- Your 2 hr break can be longer than 2 hrs and this still works, BUT keep in mind your 14 hr clock is still counting down during this period. If you take 8 in ths sleeper later, everything is still calculated from the end of that 2 hr-or-more break. But if you take 8 in the sleeper and then take your 2-hr-or-more break and take 3 hrs off instead of 2, that's one less hr you'll get back on your 14.

- the 8 hrs can be more than 8 hrs. Your 14 hr ckock remains "paused" until you go on OR off duty.

- the 8 hrs must be in the sleeper. The 2 hrs can be any combination of off duty or sleeper.

- Even if you don't do an 8/2 split, any time you take a full 8 or more consecutive hours in the sleeper, your 14 hr clock is "paused" during that time. Example: say you have 5, hrs left on your 11 and 7 hrs left on your 14 and decide to take an 8 hr nap in the sleeper. When you get up again you will have exactly the same amount of time left on both clocks, and your 14, hr clock will not start counting down again until you go off duty or on duty (anything but SB). This comes in handy if you're sitting at a shipper with 7 hrs left on your 14 and they take 6.5 to load you. Now you have only 30, minutes to go shut down somewhere for 8-10 hours, or you can just stay in the sleeper at the shipper for 1.5 more hours and you'll get that 7 hours back on your 14.

I think that covers everything. If not, Rainy will fill in the rest.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Oops apparently I have a potty-mouth. Sorry TT embarrassed.gif

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I do this all the time. I don't understand your example so I will just explain..

1.) One of the breaks MUST be 8 hours in sleeper. The other can be 2 or more hours of sleeper OR off duty. But not less than 2 hours straight.

2.) 8 hours in sleeper will extend your 14 hour clock and give you back only the amount of time you had left when you went in sleeper.

For example if you go into sleeper at 3pm for 8 hrs with three hours on your clock.... at 11pm you will still have three hours on your clock.

You can use the 8 hours in sleeper without having to take the 2 hours later. I often do this at customers. I park less than 50 mile from customer the night before.... then at customer will do 8 in sleeper if they take more than 3 hours to load me and get me out of there. By the time my 8 hours is up I can roll out with an almost full clock.

3.) When you take the 8/2 splits... you get back your 11/14 but then it is deducted by the amount of time you drove between the two breaks.

If you go 8 in sleeper at 3pm... drive two hours starting at 11pm.. then at 1am shut down for two hours... your 14 clock starts at the end of the 8 hour break... not the 2 hrs... and since you drove 2 hours.. you would only get 9 hours of drive time.

I'm going to guess this played a roll in the 48 min scenario of the original poster?

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Hahhah haha u type faster than me... hahhahah. And yes.. I do this all the time and it has saved my butt dozens of times. REALLY helps me in getting to customers early

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Hahhah haha u type faster than me... hahhahah. And yes.. I do this all the time and it has saved my butt dozens of times. REALLY helps me in getting to customers early

Haha I had to hurry to beat you to it!!

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I'm actually finishing up a 2 hr break right now because I have to drive 11, hrs today and I like to take a nap during the day. A 30- minute break just isn't long enough

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I have been summoned.

Lets say you end your day with 9hours left on your clock.

If I put myself on sleeper berth with 9 hours left on my clock and I stay on sleeper berth for 8 hours then I'll get back the clock that I had when I started my sleeper berth. ( in this case 9 hours I'll get back).

So if I put myself on sleeper berth with 5 hours left on my clock. Then on my 8th hour of sleeper berth I get back 5 hours on my clock. Finish out that 5 hours and put yourself on Off Duty and you'll get more hours back.

Upon completion of 8 consecutive hours of sleeper berth I'll get back the exact hours that I had when I first started my sleeper berth. Finish out those hours and put yourself on Off-Duty for 2 hours and you get more time back.

The hours you get back after 2 hours of Off Duty is a simple calculation.

X is the hours you drove after being on SB for 8 hours assuming 11 hour clock was less than the 14 hour clock. So...

11 - X = total numbers of hours youll get back after 2 hours of Off Duty.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kat's Comment
member avatar

Does Qualcomm HOS calculate all that for you?

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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