What Are Top 10-20 Rookie / Student Driving Mistakes In First 6-12 Months ?

Topic 1517 | Page 2

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Daniel B.'s Comment
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Yeah, me too! I ran so hard last week that after 3400 miles I'm on a forced holiday today! Talk about not dividing out your hours evenly - I'm guilty! But I sure made my dispatcher happy. He owes me now!

Nice mileage! im still looking for your truck number haha. No luck yet. Ill be on my own holiday soon. Just going to deliver this load and then spend the day in the shop then drive home on I5 to Sacramento for 6 days off. I'm dreading turning 22, I liked saying that I'm a 21 year old driver. It raises more eyebrows. rofl-3.gif

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Villain's Comment
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"#11. Going for the difficult parking spots at truck stops instead of parking in an easy spot and walking an extra 15 feet. Most accidents occur at truck stops so its a good habit to be extra vigilant in them." - Daniel B.

Disclaimer: I have 3 weeks Solo experience so maybe I'm just doing it the hard way.

Yes it's nice to find a pull through spot. Sooner or later though you're going to have to back in. At first, I would go to a truck stop & find the back row. I practiced backing in to a spot with empty spots on both sides. Then I started backing in to spots with a truck on my near side. Now, I still try to park in the farthest row (it's healthy to take a longer walk after sitting all day), but when I pull in at peak times, if there's a spot open, it's mine. I might pull up & goal 10 times, but I'm getting in. Leave the ego behind.

You have to become proficient at backing. So while you want to be safe at all times, you have to seek out opportunities to hone your skills. For me, the truck stops have been a great place to get better at backing.

Jose R.'s Comment
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I’m 1 year in and these are what I’ve personally experienced that I would say in my opinion others might agree with.

1. Route planning: Always check an atlas never 100% rely on any GPS (use a current year atlas) look around at all signs it will give arrows for truck routes and low clearance locations. 2. If you miss your turn. Do not panic look for a safe and legal place to park. Also look around for truck route signs and main streets that are big enough for you to turn in and work your way around. It’s best to stop and rethink and use your head. I sometimes use google maps satellite view to show me how many lanes their are to make sure I’m in my correct lane and use main streets to make wide turns.

3. Any time I go to shipper or receiver I look at the satellite or street view to check the truck entrance and to see how backing would be since some places are more tighter to maneuver in.

4. Never back into a spot if your uncertain. It’s best to reset your angle or to figure out an easy spot to maneuver in. I always pick a spot alone to practice my backing in where I have 2-3 spaces of room to work with.

5. Ask questions I have asked other drivers for advice if I’m never certain the old school driver and experienced men and women who have been on the road will have tips and advice for you that may come in use later.

6. If your unsure about a turn it’s best to take it wider when sage to do so because it’s best to make it around something safely then to narrowly miss or to under shoot a turn.

7. Always know where your tandems are because that’s how you will tell how much to cut or to take a turn wide.

8. Keep a cool head there’s going to be some people who really get irritated by rookies like us but the majority are very helpful and know what it’s like to be in our shoes and will help. Keep a cool head at all times.

9. Always watch other drivers and speak to some because you never stop learning on the job everyday isn’t the same.

what are top 10-20 rookie / student driving mistakes in first 6-12 months ? i am hoping the answers are more specific like "downshifting mistakes" or "low clearance mistakes" or "not reading all the signs" or "not preparing for the route enough" or "bad backup setups/tips", "not setting tandems / weight balance correctly", etc. some of the ones like "not focusing on a parking arrangement" in your 10th hour of the 11 hour day is also along that line as well. thank you jt

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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