Fear/anxiety With The Big Rigs

Topic 15259 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Eddie F.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi all, I am comfortable driving straight trucks, but for some reason, the big rigs scare me. My fears are specific: getting a red light ticket after the "point of no return" has been reached when the traffic light turns yellow. I also have the fear of truck scales: the cops giving me (and every other driver) the close look, to see what they can write the driver up for. I also have fear of, say, a tire blowing that could cause an accident in which another person (or myself) could be killed or badly injured. The shrinks might call this "social anxiety" or "situational anxiety", or "fear of humiliation" (with cops writing me up), I'm not sure. Surely many of you have had these fears/anxieties as well. Please let me know how you dealt with those thoughts and feelings. Thanks very much.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Simple... experience. You won't be on your own for awhile.. so by the time you are you will feel comfortable. My first week on the truck I would move to the right and hug the shoulder... the trainer asked why and I said "big scary truck passing" after a week I was a big scary truck passing the others.

I feared a blow out and when it happened I didn't even know it. I didn't hear it and another driver slowed to tell me. I drove nights so most scales are closed... and because I work for a large company with a great safety rating... I rarely even get pulled in tone weighed. Been solo 5 mos... so u are fearing for no reason.

Traffic lights. Just assume the light will change before you get there.... slow way way down. .

worrywort's Comment
member avatar

Hi - Im not even in school yet, but from what I've seen here, I guess everyone has their fears, me as well and I'm working on being more positive and realistic about stuff instead of my negative thoughts turning into a self fulfilling prophecy. I'm afraid of jackknifing one day, but if I constantly worry about that I may some day do the thing I've been thinking about (bad thoughts lead to bad feelings lead to bad actions I guess...) then I'll never get anywhere.

Hi all, I am comfortable driving straight trucks, but for some reason, the big rigs scare me. My fears are specific: getting a red light ticket after the "point of no return" has been reached when the traffic light turns yellow. I also have the fear of truck scales: the cops giving me (and every other driver) the close look, to see what they can write the driver up for. I also have fear of, say, a tire blowing that could cause an accident in which another person (or myself) could be killed or badly injured. The shrinks might call this "social anxiety" or "situational anxiety", or "fear of humiliation" (with cops writing me up), I'm not sure. Surely many of you have had these fears/anxieties as well. Please let me know how you dealt with those thoughts and feelings. Thanks very much.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Eddie F.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks very much , Rainy and Worrywort.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Doing a proper pretrip before every shift and posttrip at the end of each day will help immensely in quelling those fears. Also scale each and rvery load and you'll never need to be concerned at scales either. Oh and as for traffic signals, as long as it's not red when you enter the intersection, you're good to go. Just slow down a bit, watch for cars waiting that may have tripped a light change. Also realize the majority of DOT or Vehicle Enforcement Officers (as they ptefer to be called) are everyday people just doing a job to support their families just lile we are

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Knowledge, training, experience, more knowledge, more experience, and eventually confidence will overcome most of your anxiety. Fear on the other hand, the healthy kind is ok to carry around with you. Keeps you sharp and focused.

I cannot say I ever had anxiety with truck driving, but definitely a healthy respect for the magnitude of which we have under our control.

My number one suggestion is to take it one step at a time. Don't worry or obsess over step 5 when you only just begun step 1.

If you haven't already done so, probably a good idea to spend some time with the following links:

Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

You have all those same possibilities in a straight truck but I find that the combination would be more stable in a blowout.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Eddie F.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks very much, Sue D., G-Town, and Pat M.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

There's a book called Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell about people who are recognized as being great achieved that. From Wikipedia, "Gladwell repeatedly mentions the "10,000-Hour Rule", claiming that the key to achieving world class expertise in any skill, is, to a large extent, a matter of practicing the correct way, for a total of around 10,000 hours."

This is often applied to athletes, musicians, and others, but think about 10,000 hours of driving a truck while practicing doing everything the correct way. That's going to be about a half million miles, or four years of driving, all while consciously practicing safe driving habits. I can tell you for myself at least that not quite two years in, I don't always practice doing it right. I do catch myself, but after a while some things seem like second nature.

During the initial phase of learning to control the truck, most people are hyper-vigilant. The truck seems so big, the space between the truck and whatever it might hit seems so small . . . and then there's shifting and braking and turning wide and backing. It's a little overwhelming since you have to start practicing those skills all at once. It's not like baseball, where you can practice batting for an hour, then throwing and catching for an hour, then running the bases or sliding.

But the main thing to remember is that just thinking about doing it isn't the same as doing it. So do what you can to get ready, then do it. Don't worry about something you haven't even had a chance to try! That's like worrying whether you can hit the curve when all you've done so far is play tee ball.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Eddie F.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks very much, Bud.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More