Back To The Drawing Board... XPO Vs. CRST ... What Are Your Thoughts?

Topic 15715 | Page 1

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Jeff H.'s Comment
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Roehl (my #1 pick) rejected me for some unknown reason Oh well. Back to the drawing board... I am now looking at XPO and CRST both are recruiting in my area. XPO vs. CRST ... What are your thoughts?

Old School's Comment
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Do you want to be a team driver? CRST is primarily team driving - that is usually not the best way to start your career in my opinion. Many have done it that way, but it brings so many more issues to the table that I think it's best to save that option for later when you've already conquered some of the other problems with getting started out in this career.

Bucket's Comment
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I choose XPO. I based my choice on what the school instructors had to say.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Roehl (my #1 pick) rejected me for some unknown reason Oh well. Back to the drawing board... I am now looking at XPO and CRST both are recruiting in my area. XPO vs. CRST ... What are your thoughts?

The biggest difference, is that CRST is purely a Team Company, and XPO, you can go solo, or team, and they also have regional , intermodal , dedicated, and ltl options. (CRST might, but I am unaware of it.)

With the recent acquisition of Con-Way, you will probably have access to a broader base of support, as well. (my opinion)

What it basically boils down to, is if you want to be Team Driver, or Solo. With XPO, you can always switch if you find that Team is not for you. At CRST, you are bound to their contact, before you can find a new company to drive solo for.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Jeff H.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Roehl (my #1 pick) rejected me for some unknown reason Oh well. Back to the drawing board... I am now looking at XPO and CRST both are recruiting in my area. XPO vs. CRST ... What are your thoughts?

double-quotes-end.png

The biggest difference, is that CRST is purely a Team Company, and XPO, you can go solo, or team, and they also have regional , intermodal , dedicated, and ltl options. (CRST might, but I am unaware of it.)

With the recent acquisition of Con-Way, you will probably have access to a broader base of support, as well. (my opinion)

What it basically boils down to, is if you want to be Team Driver, or Solo. With XPO, you can always switch if you find that Team is not for you. At CRST, you are bound to their contact, before you can find a new company to drive solo for.

I had no idea CRST was team. No I am not interested in team. I will try to get XPO application in. Hopefully they will take me in there program. I will see what happens.

Thanks everyone for your insight!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Don't take offense to this, but rookies (myself included), really need to research a company before applying. We have the same handful of companies pop up here in the forums that people have had trouble with. Most of these companies information is available somewhere online, as well as this site. I looked into companies for weeks before I decided on mine and knew just about all I could before I got here. I hate to see people sign contracts with companies without knowing much about them, then ending up in a bad situation to start an already stressful occupation. Good luck in your search.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

dirtrocker's Comment
member avatar

I'm a driver for CRST. I'm not a big fan of teams either but I've been lucky and have been able to get along with my co driver Anyway, I've been on a dedicated route for XPO. Driving from Washington to Tennessee and back.

I dint really have a point I just thought it was kind of funny you thinking about one of the two and I'm basically driving for both.

Ok. I'm done now...

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

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