Truck Drivers Ages

Topic 1623 | Page 1

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Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
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As I consider the aspects of entering this career field at the age of 59, I am wondering how old are the drivers out there. I am sure the average is an age younger than I am. But how old are the old crusty drivers out there? How old was the oldest driver you ever encountered?

I hope some of you are not thinking to yourselves "Why is he even bothering to start in this field? He only has ____ (put a low number in here) years before they get rid of him."

So how many years do you think I can drive before I am asked (or forced?) to quit?

Old School's Comment
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Best Answer!

Steven, forgive me if I sound like an old person who repeats their stories all the time. I've shared this story many times here, but you probably have never heard it.

I started this career after retiring from my first career at the age of 53. That's not all that remarkable, but there was another gentleman in my orientation group who got hired the same week as I did who was 73! He's a fine truck driver and I've run into him several times out here at various truck stops. What's even more remarkable is that just last week I met a man who was 82 and still at it - he was an owner operator , but still chasing that white line as he put it to me.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Danny S.'s Comment
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Steven, I am 57 and getting into trucking I know how you feel. My understanding is that as long as you can past the DOT physical there is no age limit. Now companies may have other criteria but I don't think anyone can openly discriminate because of age. Those that have been driving for a while can tell us more. Good luck in your journey.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
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Danny aced it! The average age for a driver is in the mid 40s. There is no age discrimination. In fact, companies prefer older drivers because they are usually more mature and take less chances. As long as you can pass the DOT physical you got a job. Good luck

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Andy H. aka AZ Scooby's Comment
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I just graduated from school and there was a guy in our truck that was 57. He did as good as anyone and I see no reason why he wouldn't be a successful truck driver. So don't worry about it too much. If you can pass the physical then you should be as able as anyone.

-Andy

Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
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Well thanks for the insight. I know you are as young as you feel. I am just a kid in an older "chassis". Naturally, the older you get, the more susceptible you are to health issues. So as long as I can stay healthy and alert, it's good to know that I can still drive!

Starcar's Comment
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CRUSTY ???? Did he say CRUSTY ?????? well...this "crusty" old broad is 62. We just sold our truck, and I'm driving part time right now, and won't be going back OTR , unless they offer me a regional straight delivery route....I'm old, and wore out, and don't like going to the NE.... But they all have it right. If you are in decent shape for an old fart (thats for callin' me crusty), you should do fine. And WelcomE TO TT !!!!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
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CRUSTY ???? Did he say CRUSTY ?????? well...this "crusty" old broad is 62. We just sold our truck, and I'm driving part time right now, and won't be going back OTR , unless they offer me a regional straight delivery route....I'm old, and wore out, and don't like going to the NE.... But they all have it right. If you are in decent shape for an old fart (thats for callin' me crusty), you should do fine. And WelcomE TO TT !!!!

LOL! No offense for the 'crusty' reference. I was just trying to be vivid. Well, perhaps I better quit the descriptions before I get into more trouble! But what I was thinking was I still have enough spunk to get some years in OTR driving and the way I've read so far is that the longer you stay, the more different opportunities become available. I am glad to hear from a "genuine" older than I person in the industry! Thank you for that, Crusty. Doh! embarrassed.gif I mean Starcar.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rite Turn's Comment
member avatar

Wow, I guess I'm the old duffer of TT. I retired at 62 and after 3 years decided I did not like it. I just started OTR with a national company. Being ( and looking) 65 I get a lot of "looks" and many younger drivers calling me sir. But in the end I'm treated no different by them or the company. If you can do the job and do it safely that's all that matters. I will probably last longer than many of the younger drivers who are so overweight they can hardly fit behind the wheel. I would like to see more discussion on TT about what I see as a huge problem of trucker obeseity. Really enjoy all the threads.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Karen S.'s Comment
member avatar

I am a little old Granny woman who got her CDL at the young age of 50. Now 7 years later I am still going strong with no sign of retirement anywhere in the near future. I applied recently with Con-way Truckload but couldn't pass their "physical agility" test so I went back to the drawing board and I am lifting weights on the truck and I am determined to pass it the next time around. So, in response to your inquiry if you are too old H E double toothpicks! NO!!! There are way more of us old farts out here then snot nosed 20 something kids and we will last for the long haul because for the most part we have raised our families and don't have any major need to be at home. We are more mature in our way of dealing with all of the irritations that occur out here and we have way more patients for sitting in traffic, waiting at shippers and receivers, and dealing with all of the fools you will meet along the way.

As to the Obesity of the younger drivers, that is going by the way side because the majority of the larger companies are going to the agility tests which are physically demanding but also pushing for endurance while monitoring heart and lung function as well as blood pressure. When you are obese you can physically meet the strength tests but you can't satisfy the heart rate requirements or blood pressure restrictions so they will be getting weeded out. Right now they are only using the tests to weed out new hires but it won't be long before they start requiring it when you have to renew your DOT Medical Card as well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Yup, with BMI , and the physical problems that come with obesity,The days of the "rolling truckers" will come to an end. And its a good thing...Its bad enough that the worst food you can eat is sold at truck stops. Now it isn't bad once in awhile, but a steady diet of it is not going to do you any good. I'd eat MRE's before I'd relegate myself to truckstop food as a steady diet. Steven....I'm glad you have a sense of humor...it will go a long way out there as a trucker on the road...just don't trade it in for a jaded opinion of humans as a whole.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

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