Load Temp

Topic 16274 | Page 1

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Freebird's Comment
member avatar

Arrived at consignee here in Florida with no problems. Backed into door and get a call from receiving office temp was out of range to pull out and park untiL further notice.

The load was to be setc at 34 degrees start stop so I set it there for trip. Had no warnings or alerts telling me of a temperature issue whole trip. Light was green whole time. Consignee is saying it was in high 40s the whole trip. Now been stuck for 8 hours waiting on if they gonna reject or accept. I'm freaking out as I'm a newbie and upset that a whole freaking load could be rejected. I'm just not sure how this happened. Anyone know how this could be possible?

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Don't freak out. Try to remain calm. I guess my first question is, did you call your driver manager or dispatcher? Hoping the answer is "yes".

This situation can happen without an alarm occurring. Here's how:

If your trailer has a bad seal(s) or the thermostat, or thermostat display is malfunctioning, this could happen. If the door has a small vent (some do, some don't), make sure it's closed. Although your temperature was set at 34 degrees, the actual couldn't have been that high. My suggestion going forward, check both the setting and the actual (or ambient) throughout your route every time you stop, especially early in the trip to make sure the interior is within a few degrees of the setting. Write the temps down, when you checked them and also take a picture of the display to CYA. Also on many bills there is a suggested "setting" and the "actual" required to keep the product from spoiling. You should always check both.

As such, go to your reefer unit and look at the display panel on the side. There should be two temperatures displayed, the setting (which is the smaller number) and the actual which is the larger number. What does it display? If it's not appearing press the menu button and scroll through it until you see a "temp." option and select it.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Freebird's Comment
member avatar

Yes, I contacted them asap. A lady in our claims department has also contacted me to let me know they sent the trailer Temps to shipper. The set point has been at 34 degrees. The actual has varied every time I looked at it on the reefer display when I stopped ranging from 34 to 38 degrees believe it or not. Must been leak somewhere that I don't see. I've walked around trailer looking. I switched it to continuous and the actual temp on display is staying at 33-34 degrees. I feel bad. Hope it all works out.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Yes, I contacted them asap. A lady in our claims department has also contacted me to let me know they sent the trailer Temps to shipper. The set point has been at 34 degrees. The actual has varied every time I looked at it on the reefer display when I stopped ranging from 34 to 38 degrees believe it or not. Must been leak somewhere that I don't see. I've walked around trailer looking. I switched it to continuous and the actual temp on display is staying at 33-34 degrees. I feel bad. Hope it all works out.

Okay, CYA then. Take a picture of the display...showing the temps. Send it to your DM and claims. I think you have done everything you can at this point. Try not to sweat it.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

murderspolywog's Comment
member avatar

Freebird on top of what g town mentioned, there are a few other thing that could have happend as well, did this load go to the roof? If so one of the pallets might have blocked the air shoot. The air shoot might not be properly attached at the back of the trailer. Your in FL, it's hot if there was a temp sensor on this load, and it's at the back of the trailer and on top it could have been High 40s. I used to haul out of AZ all the time in the summer we had to run the trailer 10 to 20 degrees cooler then was recommended on frozen loaded. To keep them at or below 0. For produce we had to run on continuous, to keep are temps between 34 and 36, Walmart would put the tattle tale on the back box on top. Did the paper work say to maintain 34 or set at 34? Can I ask what you have on board, dairy or produce? Also anytime your going to change the temp on a load go thought your Dm , or get the shipper to change it on the paperwork.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Freebird's Comment
member avatar

Freebird on top of what g town mentioned, there are a few other thing that could have happend as well, did this load go to the roof? If so one of the pallets might have blocked the air shoot. The air shoot might not be properly attached at the back of the trailer. Your in FL, it's hot if there was a temp sensor on this load, and it's at the back of the trailer and on top it could have been High 40s. I used to haul out of AZ all the time in the summer we had to run the trailer 10 to 20 degrees cooler then was recommended on frozen loaded. To keep them at or below 0. For produce we had to run on continuous, to keep are temps between 34 and 36, Walmart would put the tattle tale on the back box on top. Did the paper work say to maintain 34 or set at 34? Can I ask what you have on board, dairy or produce? Also anytime your going to change the temp on a load go thought your Dm , or get the shipper to change it on the paperwork.

It wasn't loaded to roof but clear back to the doors. It said maintain 34 degrees. No higher than 41 degrees. Doing live load call dispatch mentioned 34 start stop so that what I put it on. I was hauling yogurt which I'm bout to pour out and make a huge yogurt pool cause they just told me they rejected. Smh. Expensive trucking lesson for me. Feel bad as crap right now. I'll learn and move on and not make mistake again.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Thentair B.'s Comment
member avatar

We're all learning through mistakes.. that's how experience comes... I'm a newbie who is still going to make a lot of mistake, I know... but that's why I am here... I want to learn and have some experience without mistakes... but sometimes they are not avoidable so what you've done is natural. you shouldn't feel that bad.

murderspolywog's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Freebird on top of what g town mentioned, there are a few other thing that could have happend as well, did this load go to the roof? If so one of the pallets might have blocked the air shoot. The air shoot might not be properly attached at the back of the trailer. Your in FL, it's hot if there was a temp sensor on this load, and it's at the back of the trailer and on top it could have been High 40s. I used to haul out of AZ all the time in the summer we had to run the trailer 10 to 20 degrees cooler then was recommended on frozen loaded. To keep them at or below 0. For produce we had to run on continuous, to keep are temps between 34 and 36, Walmart would put the tattle tale on the back box on top. Did the paper work say to maintain 34 or set at 34? Can I ask what you have on board, dairy or produce? Also anytime your going to change the temp on a load go thought your Dm , or get the shipper to change it on the paperwork.

double-quotes-end.png

It wasn't loaded to roof but clear back to the doors. It said maintain 34 degrees. No higher than 41 degrees. Doing live load call dispatch mentioned 34 start stop so that what I put it on. I was hauling yogurt which I'm bout to pour out and make a huge yogurt pool cause they just told me they rejected. Smh. Expensive trucking lesson for me. Feel bad as crap right now. I'll learn and move on and not make mistake again.

When I used to run reeffer with central we had a rule that if it was a dairy load had to be run on continuous, sometimes dispatch would call because we had the reefer set on continuous, and we were using to much fuel. Even thought the sop said to use continuous. Just fallow the paperwork and ask questions.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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