The Magic Question

Topic 1639 | Page 1

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RedGator's Comment
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So after hitting my 1 year anniversary with WEL Companies everyone keeps asking me if Im going to move on. My answer: Not anytime soon! I really enjoy my company. They were a great starter company due to money and length of training. You train for 6 weeks getting paid $400 a week and Solo you start out at .33/cpm your first 6 months. 6-9 .36/cpm 9-12 .38/cpm and one year .42/cpm. Thats the highest progression I found at my time of research. They are a small family oriented company. Everybody knows my name and Ive proven myself. So why the heck would I leave? True our freight doesn't stretch around very far and im primarily running 80 between WI and PA but Im avg. 2500-3500 a week. I have the option to go regional and be home every weekend but I live in PA and DO NOT want to run LTL loads in NE all week. The pay is good .46/cpm but Nah Ill keep the open road and my piece of mind for now:) I just cant see myself starting all over just because I have a year. Now if things "fall off" or I find a just all out AMAZING opportunity then ya never know but for now Im staying put!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

blue WEL big-rig tractor trailer in parking lotblue WEL big-rig tractor trailer in parking lot

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Thats a great way to break down what the company you are with can offer you, versus any other company that "may" come thru on the offers they put in their ads... CONGRATS ON THAT YEAR !!!!!!

Steven B.'s Comment
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"Wel done."

Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
member avatar

"Wel done."

rofl-1.gif

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I moved around quite a bit over a 15 year period out of curiosity or due to a change in life plans like trying a new career or taking a break from the road for a few months. But I never changed companies because I thought it would be better elsewhere. I just thought it would be different, mostly based upon hauling different types of freight.

But in the end, the differences between different types of freight were far greater than the differences between different companies. Everyone is always looking for that "great company". Well, there's very little difference between most companies to be honest. And I'll add this - if you're pretty happy where you're at then you're not going to be any happier anywhere else. "Pretty happy" is about as good as it gets with any company because there is no perfect company.

And of course once you've proven yourself to a company you're in an awesome position. You can get special favors sometimes when you need em, you'll be given more freedoms and leeway, you'll get better miles than unproven drivers overall, and of course you're making a lot more money.

So I'm totally with ya on that decision. I can't think of a reason in the world for you to leave based on what you've said. If you're pretty happy where you're at then stick around. You're not missing anything by staying where you're at.

RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Thats a great way to break down what the company you are with can offer you, versus any other company that "may" come thru on the offers they put in their ads... CONGRATS ON THAT YEAR !!!!!!

Thanks Star;) Yep they definitely took care of me.

RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for posting my truck Daniel:) Brett, I have a pesky little quality called LOYALTY. I have spent months building my relationship with my DM and my company. I get great miles. I get treated like family by the office and drivers alike. I get to venture out of my zone cause my DM knows what I like. The rate of pay I get is pretty much one of the best cpm overall. Im sure theres better but how many miles are ya making? Maybe one day I might want to venture out but for now Im happy. As you say EVERY company has its pluses and minuses its all about what works for you.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar

INTEGRITY! That's what you have and a great deal of it. It is a honor to read your post.

ThinksTooMuch's Comment
member avatar

Congrats! Do what you feel is right. You're happy and you're doing a good job, that's really all that matters.

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