Truckers Fat Fight

Topic 16717 | Page 2

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Terminal Rat ( aka...J's Comment
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I honestly don't know how some of the guys get as big as they are. Heck, I've lost almost two pants sizes in the 4 months I've been on the road. LOL

JJ

T-Fit1's Comment
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I honestly don't know how some of the guys get as big as they are. Heck, I've lost almost two pants sizes in the 4 months I've been on the road. LOL

JJ

That's awesome to hear! Congratulations! were you able to do that? Did you exercise or just watch what you ate?

Lyght's Comment
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Honestly that is something I've wondered about as I study for my CDL. As you can see from my picture I'm already heavier than I really care to be. I'll be driving teams with my wife which I think will limit any time to try to exercise. I know we'll still be required the stops during the different time clocks that I might be able to get out and do some jogging or maybe some push ups but the goal is to drive as much as we can. I know a slow cooker is a must to cut down on fast food, my wife and I are already trying different cans soups to see what we like to try to cut down on eating out to much on the road. At one point I was thinking about getting a few weights and working out with them while driving but the more I learn the more I see how that would be a really dangerously stupid thing to do. If you get a program for truck drivers set you, make sure you do one for teams too and keep in mind how little time you'll have to work out and how limited food choices will be. Most trucks don't have a lot of choices on how you cook your food and a lot of them don't have a fridge either.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
JakeBreak's Comment
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Any trucker concerned about health is going to have a cooler and a way to cook food in the truck. Personally I think 90 percent of the problem is diet. Every single truck stop has fast food and all the processed garbage. Don't get me wrong the processed garbage tastes really good but it's not very healthy. I recently started a diet and I've lost 10 lbs in the past 3 weeks.

Steve L.'s Comment
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I lost 45lbs in my first six months of driving. Here's how I did it;

Breakfast-chewy granola bar and bottle of water. Lunch-ham n cheese sandwich using 2 slices of ham 1 cheese and 100 calorie Sandwich Thins and either a bottle of water or a caffeine free Diet Coke Dinner-1 can of soup heated in my truck, peanut butter sandwich using Sandwich Thins and a bottle of water.

I have an exercise band (thanks Brett for the idea), but I rarely use it.

The biggest challenge I see to your idea is the discipline required, especially because some of us can't stock up on perishables. And if a driver is OTR , grocery store trips are few and far between...unless you park there a lot.

Splurging for me is Subway.

I've gained about 8lbs the past year. That's because I'm less disciplined and eat more McD's than before.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

T-Fit1's Comment
member avatar

Honestly that is something I've wondered about as I study for my CDL. As you can see from my picture I'm already heavier than I really care to be. I'll be driving teams with my wife which I think will limit any time to try to exercise. I know we'll still be required the stops during the different time clocks that I might be able to get out and do some jogging or maybe some push ups but the goal is to drive as much as we can. I know a slow cooker is a must to cut down on fast food, my wife and I are already trying different cans soups to see what we like to try to cut down on eating out to much on the road. At one point I was thinking about getting a few weights and working out with them while driving but the more I learn the more I see how that would be a really dangerously stupid thing to do. If you get a program for truck drivers set you, make sure you do one for teams too and keep in mind how little time you'll have to work out and how limited food choices will be. Most trucks don't have a lot of choices on how you cook your food and a lot of them don't have a fridge either.

That is what we are all about. Fast training programs and quick food options if that is what you need. We use a variety of food types: pre cooked foods, fresh foods, and fast food options. Could you tell me more about this driving team concept? I am unfamiliar with it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
T-Fit1's Comment
member avatar

Any trucker concerned about health is going to have a cooler and a way to cook food in the truck. Personally I think 90 percent of the problem is diet. Every single truck stop has fast food and all the processed garbage. Don't get me wrong the processed garbage tastes really good but it's not very healthy. I recently started a diet and I've lost 10 lbs in the past 3 weeks.

I agree with you fully! Diet is also going to be the change that the majority of people will be willing to implement first. The training stuff is just an addition to the diet program. What diet are you doing?

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Any trucker concerned about health is going to have a cooler and a way to cook food in the truck. Personally I think 90 percent of the problem is diet. Every single truck stop has fast food and all the processed garbage. Don't get me wrong the processed garbage tastes really good but it's not very healthy. I recently started a diet and I've lost 10 lbs in the past 3 weeks.

double-quotes-end.png

I agree with you fully! Diet is also going to be the change that the majority of people will be willing to implement first. The training stuff is just an addition to the diet program. What diet are you doing?

Keto. Basically I gave up all my carbs. I take in less than 20g of carbs a day and I'll be honest it really sucks most of the time but considering the amount of appetite control it gave me I can deal with it. I literally eat 1 meal a day. I used to eat 3 meals plus snacks and I gained 25 lbs in my first year.

John L.'s Comment
member avatar

What diet are you doing?

What is wrong with the tried and true 'One Biscuit' Diet?

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Honestly I dont think you are going to "change other people".

While its true there are some... Drivers out here who need the help, chances are those who need it most, Im guessing, probably wouldnt be interested. Incidentally many health insurance plans ALREADY offer wellness and fitness programs. Some truckstops have fitness centers and my company offers gym memberships.

Those who care are doing things like parking farther away, making laps around a truckstop, bicycling, and stocking or preparing healthier snacks and meals.

Small weights are easily doable in a truck too.

Ill listen to what you have to say, but the way you went about this wasnt well thought out.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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