Teaming With Wife.

Topic 16836 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Tracu A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello gentlemen! I have been reading alot of info. Maybe to much. Because as soon as I read one thing, I read something else saying different. Well the wife and I are thinking of teaming together, after getting our cdls. I read that teams get less cpm , but get more miles thus they make more. I just read a comment were someone mentioned they teamed for a while, yet they make about the same driving solo. Is it worthwhile for us to team generally. Or is the team thing all hogwash. We are looking at teaming at KLLM, or C.R. England, because they are close.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

1 advantage for teaming with a spouse is you make money on all the miles. From what little I have researched (I am a new rookie solo driver) teams tend to get paid a higher cpm than solo. The miles are split evenly for the truck and paid to each driver. So, if you are teamed with your wife, she will get paid for half and you will get paid for half. It doesn't much matter who drove what miles. The total miles are split evenly.

I know there are several team drivers on here. I am sure they can be of more assistance than I can be.

Drive Safe

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TNTrucker73's Comment
member avatar

Let say new Driver makes 34 cpm can run average of 3000 miles that is $1020. Now say you start out teaming at .42cpm and you both run a total of 6000 miles Thats $2520 so you both gross $480 total more on the same miles . Meaning you both made $1260 instead of $1020.. Teaming is better money as long as you can do it without Divorcing. Its alot of time with one another

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
I read that teams get less cpm , but get more miles thus they make more.

This is typically the way it works, yes. Here at Swift, a new solo driver makes 36 cpm (at least that was the starting pay a year ago). A new team driver makes 26 cpm, but each driver is paid for all miles the truck goes (it's the same as getting paid 52 cpm for half the miles--people use that example just to compare to solo pay). So if you average 2500 miles a week as a solo driver, you wouldn't make as much as if your team averaged 5000 miles a week. So technically, teaming can be better money. Alot of times people don't really make more as team drivers because they keep teaming with people they don't know from their company, and that often has it's own set of problems obviously--hometime, personal differences, different work ethics, etc. Teaming with your spouse is a great way to bring home more dough though, if you can both get along. Since you already know each other and live together, you can really focus on running miles and enjoying the lifestyle and half of the logistics issues other teams are having go right out the window.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Tracu A.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok, got it. But the scary part is will the miles stay consistent. I still excited tho.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Ok, got it. But the scary part is will the miles stay consistent. I still excited tho.

Honestly? Probably not at first. It'll take a good 3 or 4 months before you guys really start to get a handle on things and start getting good miles. There are always exceptions, of course, but in general that's how it seems to go.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Make sure you go to work for a team focused company. Covenent, CRST, Quest and Celadon come to mind for me. I team for a smaller solo focused company and it was inconsistent at first til they got us sorted out, but they keep us moving quite well and we are quite happy.

Look for a company that will pay at least .52 split.. Very good rate for newer drivers. After you get several years experience (my codriver is experienced-- I am still in Rookie year) there are companies who will pay teams .60 cpm and higher like Panther, Hobby Lobby, FEDEX Ground contractors, etc. Usually want 2 years exp and more.

I say its absolutely worth it. I team with my bf. If we chose to we could always go solo again, but honestly we are having too much fun. Weve talked about moving to one of those companies eventually, but neither are job hoppers and we really like our company a lot so i dont see that happening.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tracu A.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok, thx Sue! If you don't mind my asking what do you average a week in miles?

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

It varies anywhere from 4400 to 6000. However we get paid for so many things we do and a higher rate for very short runs.

My company focuses on regional short haul.. The average length of haul is only about 350 miles lol. We can run back to back short runs with much fewer over all weekly miles and still each easily gross $1300/week and up. West Side only has 2 teams total.. Out of 550 trucks, so my experience is unusual to say the least. Many team companies dispatch those drivers on longer runs. For us 1200 miles has been about the longest run. We dont go to the western 11.

If your curious about our wacky typical day, see my recent post on teaming at West Side. For solo regional drivers this company is nothing short of fantastic for those willing to work.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Phoenix's Comment
member avatar

We team with C.R. England, and we like it here. Rough beginning financially until we got on a dedicated fleet, but now we're doing fairly well, though our miles are still inconsistent. I think this is because we are constantly dealing with crises at home though. It's been difficult to get into a routine when everything changes from week to week. So I don't fault England at all. We get .42cpm split, or .21 for all the miles the truck runs on the dedicated fleet. Miles are there no problem, when we can run them. OTR fleet was .28cpm split straight out of training. That was rough lol. Dedicated accepted us before phase 2 was finished, so that was a sweet deal for us. Most companies pay more, but I look at it this way... No tuition is taken out of our pay, and our contracts are 6 months (husband is a vet), and 9 months for mine. So take home is that little bit more.

Hope that helps! good-luck.gif

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More