Man, I Am Terrible At This :(

Topic 17193 | Page 2

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Tractor Man's Comment
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Haha Fatsquatch, read my response...great minds think alike!

SHOWOFFS!!

rofl-1.gif

Susan D. 's Comment
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I agree that it was not scheduled well. Contact your dm and let them know your most current eta. They can have a customer service rep reschedule your appointment so you wouldn't be considered late. I also trip plan like Paul does... at 50 mph, rounding up and adding 2 extra hours for scaling, fueling, breaks but then pad a little more so I'm not cutting my own throat with lateness. When solo my dm used to try to push me, I tactfully told her I was tired of cutting my own throat. Depending on location, I would also add a cushion for traffic jams. I gave updated eta's each morning at the beginning of my shift also.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

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Short answer: no, it couldn't be done. They didn't leave enough time on the load.

Long answer: You put the loaded miles at 1156, so round up to 1200. Good rule of thumb for trip planning is take the miles (in hundreds) and multiply by 2 to get the number of driving hours required. So, with 1156, that gets rounded up to 1200, which works out to 24 hours of driving time. What should be obvious here is that you'll also need to figure in two 10 hour breaks, as well as an extra hour to allow for your two 30 minute breaks you'll need to take during the two drive shifts. So now you need to add 21 hours to the 24 hours of driving time, which puts you up to 45 hours total. Except you're also going to be jumping two time zones, so you need to add in another 2 hours, which makes 47 hours. Which would make your earliest ETA to your receiver in Lubbock (assuming you left the shipper with a full 11 hours, which you obviously didn't) 12/1 at 1300. A more realistic ETA would probably be 1500.

So, no, in this case it's not you who screwed up, it's whoever planned and scheduled your load. It happens. Some people just can't math, or don't know that you can't do 63 from dock door to dock door. Your DM should be able and willing to work with you and your company's CSR team to either get the load rescheduled or repowered.

double-quotes-end.png

Haha Fatsquatch, read my response...great minds think alike!

Lol, I dunno if I'd go that far. But at least we both know we're not talking out of our assets. rofl-2.gif

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

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Short answer: no, it couldn't be done. They didn't leave enough time on the load.

Long answer: You put the loaded miles at 1156, so round up to 1200. Good rule of thumb for trip planning is take the miles (in hundreds) and multiply by 2 to get the number of driving hours required. So, with 1156, that gets rounded up to 1200, which works out to 24 hours of driving time. What should be obvious here is that you'll also need to figure in two 10 hour breaks, as well as an extra hour to allow for your two 30 minute breaks you'll need to take during the two drive shifts. So now you need to add 21 hours to the 24 hours of driving time, which puts you up to 45 hours total. Except you're also going to be jumping two time zones, so you need to add in another 2 hours, which makes 47 hours. Which would make your earliest ETA to your receiver in Lubbock (assuming you left the shipper with a full 11 hours, which you obviously didn't) 12/1 at 1300. A more realistic ETA would probably be 1500.

So, no, in this case it's not you who screwed up, it's whoever planned and scheduled your load. It happens. Some people just can't math, or don't know that you can't do 63 from dock door to dock door. Your DM should be able and willing to work with you and your company's CSR team to either get the load rescheduled or repowered.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Haha Fatsquatch, read my response...great minds think alike!

double-quotes-end.png

Lol, I dunno if I'd go that far. But at least we both know we're not talking out of our assets. rofl-2.gif

Hahaha

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Sambo's Comment
member avatar

Talked to dm , and yes, he said it wasn't really my fault. I just didn't get as far driving last night. If i could have made about 520 miles, I probably would have made it, but due to driv8ng hours and slow cali traffic...and mountains, I only made about 420 miles.

Said he would make some calls and to just do the best I can.

I didn't mention anything about not having enough time on the load, don't want to be the complainer type. Trying to be the "can do" type.

Coming out of the shipper , I did make a wrong turn, which instead of going down ca60 to i10, I ended up taking i605 to i10, which was about 20 minutes longer by mileage, but ca60 was backed up bumper to bumper, but there was also traffic on 605 and i10, so I don't know, it may have cost me about 20 or 30 minutes.

I don't know if that would have made a difference, but, since I lost any time at all, I just assume that it didn't help.

Anyway, I'm sure my dm will work it out and I'll just have to try harder next time.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
's Comment
member avatar

So did you give him ur new eta? How does that work?

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

Load was too tight for a governed truck. Coming out of Cali with 55 MPH statewide, you were double-screwed.

If you had an ungoverned truck, it would have been doable, but still tight.

Your job right now is to make sure your DM knows that the load is too tight, so they can either arrange for a repower, reschedule the load, or be ready to eat the late fee. Make sure to send this info by Qualcomm (politely), so it's documented.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Over the last 5 months I average 50-52 mph on the drive line and 44-48 on the 14. Start trip planning at 50, too many variables out there as previously mentioned to use 55. I have never been given a load at Swift that didn't have ample time. As far as my ETA. I Always enter the scheduled delivery time, even though there are times I know I will get there earlier. Why put myself in a box. smile.gif

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Tractor Man stays honest:

Always enter the scheduled delivery time, even though there are times I know I will get there earlier. Why put myself in a box.

This is absolutely true. Even unimpeachable! However, if you know the receiver (even the shipper!) is cool with early appointment times, put your earlier ETA time in your Macro Loaded Call so the planner & your DM can keep you rolling. A judgement call.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Sambo's Comment
member avatar

We don't send email macros, or at least I never have. We get the dispatch with the delivery time already on it. It's up to us to make it there.on time.

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