I'm Almost To My Final Decision On Which Company I Am Going To Go With!

Topic 17371 | Page 1

Page 1 of 8 Next Page Go To Page:
Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Well I as I said in the topic title I am super, super close to deciding on what company I would like to go with, right out of CDL school. I am heavily leaning towards TMC Transport, especially because they are employee owned and they have great benefits and on top of that they pay a percentage of the price of the load, which can if not will pay more then cpm. I then go back to thinking about McElroy, Decker, Melton and now even Crosby which all pay per mile. McElroy is by far the best as far as I have researched when it comes to paying per mile. I know they just raised the pay for both the local and regionals and local is now .45 per mile and for regional .48 per mile. If anyone has any recommendations let me know. However, TMC is very well known for how well they take care of their employees and for being flexible when it comes down to family life and that sort of thing. It is also very nice to be able to have 48 hours of down time instead of just 34 hour reset.

We had a recruiter from both the McElroy and TMC companies come to our school and I must say though that I was very, very impressed with both but the one who came out on top was TMC because he was talking to us as if we were going to orientation the next morning. On some of my notes he had mentioned that working with them, many 1st year employees were making as much as $60,000 a year! That is a big plus especially for me as one who is only working for $20,000 a year and barely surviving, and that is on top of just not having nearly as much enjoyment as a trucker can have while out on the road and looking at the scenery. I have drempt of driving a big rig since I was 10 and it looks as though I will be able to fulfill this dream finally.

I do have a question, what do you all think about the said companies up above in paragraph 1, and what are some pros and cons of them?

Like I said I am pretty sure who I am going to go with and especially since I believe they are close to where I live but I am not going to be closed minded about this, so let the info come in.

Thanks you all and God bless!

smile.gifthank-you.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Chicon's Comment
member avatar

I can tell you that driving 62.5 mph sucks, when the speed limit is set higher than that. I can tell you do not step on the grass at orientation. I can tell you that when you feel like you are going to break the steering wheel on that stupid simulator because the jerk in control of the program runs a car into the back of you for no reason and knocks you off of a mountain, you let go of the steering wheel, they write it in your report. I can tell you that everyone there thinks they're still in the military. I can tell you that out of a class of thirty plus, only 5 made it back to get a truck. I can also tell you that you may or may not get a 48 hour reset. I can tell you that they could possibly blackmail you if you happen to decide that you don't want to do OTR or flatbed or that someone died and you need time off from training to attend the funeral. I can also tell you that they do know what they are doing and they are very good at it. Just wondering if you have taking into consideration the physical demands of flatbed. The heaviest tarp you have in the truck is 120lbs. When it's rolled up, is not that bad, but remember, you have to unroll and roll up and spread, secure most of the time two of them in every type of weather, so they become heavier, more slippery and let's not forget to mention the wind. The dangers of the job are real to. My trainer almost fell off of a load and it wasn't anything he did wrong. There's a lot more danger as well just in the securement of the load. I'm not telling you any of this to guide you away from it. It's just a lot more to it than you think there is.

Best of luck to you

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar
I can tell you that they could possibly blackmail you if you happen to decide that you don't want to do OTR or flatbed or that someone died and you need time off from training to attend the funeral.

Are you talking about TMC when you say that or are you talking about all companies in general? I did know that it is quite physical but all that you said was very helpful.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Chicon's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I can tell you that they could possibly blackmail you if you happen to decide that you don't want to do OTR or flatbed or that someone died and you need time off from training to attend the funeral.

double-quotes-end.png

Are you talking about TMC when you say that or are you talking about all companies in general? I did know that it is quite physical but all that you said was very helpful.

Just talking about Turtles Moving Cargo. I had actually bought my plane ticket to go to Melton, but the recruiter for the black and chrome came in to class and I changed. I never really considered McElroy just for the simple fact that I heard you can't make as much there. Sure the have a higher cpm , but that don't pay you to tarp. Tmc' s % pay has it good and it's bad. I think you start at 26 or 27, I can't remember, but at that rate, the money is so so. It takes a lot to raise your %, but not a lot for it to lower. There are several different factors to raise it, I don't remember all of them, I'm sure I have the book around still, but one is "park up points" meaning that you have to be within like 50 miles or something, of the place you are delivering to on Monday. So depending on where that is, determines what time you have cut your home time short. Another way to raise the % is by mpg, which is a tricky one. Let's say it's 20ยบ outside, your truck doesn't have an APU , so how do you stay warm? Got to idle the truck, which uses fuel, which.... That's right affects your MPG. What ..... electric heater.... well then at some point the truck will need to idle to charge the battery. Which is another issue, you get one free jump , run your battery dead again, your paying for it. I'm not saying they're a bad company to work for but the recruiter isn't going to tell you all this. They are a starter company, unless you stay long enough to get into the boat division or heavy haul.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Parrothead66's Comment
member avatar

Just choose the one you feel you'll be happier at as if you do decide to leave it usually better if you've been there at least a year. As for the 62 mph it's really not that big a deal as most of your runs are regional and you usually have ample time to make your run on time. I run my bunk heater and haven't had it run down my batteries yet. Not saying it can't happen but it hasn't. Recruiters will tell you all the good information that they think you want to hear. No McElroy doesn't pay tarp pay but I know for a fact that you can do close to 50,000 first year and over that year 2. I have talked to a few guys from TMC and they seem to be happy there. I've heard some of the stories about the "rules" but honestly I believe some of it is just urban legend stuff. Either way you go just go all in.....listen, pay attention take notes and don't be afraid to ask questions. Good luck

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Parrothead66 I will pay attention and do the best I can before making a decision to leave. I know that I have been here at my current job for 2.5 years before I decided that I had, had enough of the crap they giving me. Definitely will do my best for a year and if all works out well then I will stay for sure. 1st year is always the toughest too, so we will have to see.

Well, Chicon, I guess I will see how I can fair with TMC for a year unless I decide to go work with another company. I will probably go through the list one more time before making a final decision. I definitely want to recheck Melton, Decker, and Werner before I make my final decision. Have you all heard anything about Melton, Decker and Werner?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Victor, forgive me for high jacking this discussion, but there are just a few things in Chicon's response that I feel need to be addressed.

I can tell you that driving 62.5 mph sucks, when the speed limit is set higher than that.

Welcome to "Trucking" Chicon! Look, the speed limiters are here in every major carrier. This has nothing to do with TMC being considered a good place for someone to work or not. Your foray into being a trucker obviously didn't work out at TMC, but to use that as one of your reasons for your dissatisfaction is lame. You obviously have got a lot of adjusting to do to get accustomed to being a trucker, and from what I can tell from your first two posts today, you may not be cut out for this career after all. There is no shame in that, but when you start to come up with a bunch of finger pointing and blaming the short comings of a company that you didn't even make it through training with, then we feel obligated to respond.

I can tell you that when you feel like you are going to break the steering wheel on that stupid simulator because the jerk in control of the program runs a car into the back of you for no reason and knocks you off of a mountain, you let go of the steering wheel, they write it in your report.

They put you on that "stupid simulator" for a reason, and the real problem here is that you didn't take it nearly as seriously as they expected you to. So, is that their fault? They didn't run a car into the back of you for "no reason." The reason was obviously to see how you would react, and well... you reacted the wrong way. Get over it, and realize that you screwed up. We teach people all the time in here how going to a company's orientation, and/or training, is a several weeks long interview process, they are watching your every move. You made several missteps in the process and now you are reaping the results.

I can tell you that everyone there thinks they're still in the military.

That is how TMC is structured, they are proud of it, and it gets the results they are after. They don't hide that fact, and if you had paid attention beforehand you would have known that this is how it works over there. I believe we even pointed this out to you before you went over there, I know I remember about pointing out to you about their strict adherence to their rules and guidelines.

I can tell you that out of a class of thirty plus, only 5 made it back to get a truck.

Also typical of just about any company that you go to for orientation. Chicon, how many times have you read in this forum how we teach people that this business is all performance based? You see, most people think they are at orientation for a job, but the truth is that you are there for an interview. It is sometimes a convoluted process, but it is what works for the industry, and just about everybody does it this way. You were not fully prepared for what you faced. That is all on you, not on TMC.

I can also tell you that you may or may not get a 48 hour reset.

Okay, this statement is structurally factual, but their is no written promise from TMC guaranteeing 48 hours at home. They are going to try and get you home on the weekend, but they are not going to guarantee you so many hours at home. A good efficient flat-bedder knows that the tricks of the trade involve picking up a load at the end of the day on Friday, so that you can make an early morning delivery Monday. That may mean that your available hours don't allow you to get home until Saturday at six a.m, and then you need to leave Sunday afternoon at four so that you can get to your consignee and sleep on their premises so that you have the hours to roll on to the next load when they unload you first thing Monday. That is just how things work out here - at least you reset your 70, and you slept in your own bed. Again this is stuff that you were not prepared for - I see no fault here in the way TMC runs their program. Once again you were not prepared for the "lifestyle" of this career. Geez Chicon, are you starting to see a pattern here in your remarks?

Continued...

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I can tell you that they could possibly blackmail you if you happen to decide that you don't want to do OTR or flatbed or that someone died and you need time off from training to attend the funeral.

Okay, I read what you said about this in another thread, and I think your word of blackmail is a little strong here. They just laid out the facts for you. They said you could quit, and not get your last check, which is explained in orientation paperwork (yes, I've been there, and I know how this works), or they could release you but you could probably expect something negative on your DAC. That is not blackmail, when they fire you they put the reason why on your DAC. Quitting has consequences, and so does failure - get over it man! The truth here is found somewhere in the middle of all your remarks, and I think this statement comes the closest to the truth of anything you've stated so far... "if you happen to decide that you don't want to do OTR or flatbed."

Look, if you decide you don't like it that is all fine and good, but don't go blaming the company for that. And companies have policies on funeral leave. I don't know the specifics at TMC, but I can tell you that most companies don't allow you to take a week off for a friend's death, expecially whil you are on a trainer's truck! It is sad to lose a friend, no one will argue with that, but as a brand new employee who is already "at risk" you made a big blunder by just sending an email and then expecting that to suffice for you to take a week off. I don't think most company policies allow a week off for even a family members death. Now, had you been a well established, proven driver, with an excellent track record, this would have all been handled differently. But as a rookie in training, you really expected to get the kid glove treatment? Chicon, you made some big mistakes, and now you are going to face the consequences.

I can also tell you that they do know what they are doing and they are very good at it.

Well, you redeemed yourself with that statement, congratulations! You just had to get some of that bitter taste out of your mouth first I guess.

I'm not telling you any of this to guide you away from it. It's just a lot more to it than you think there is.

Well, it certainly sounded as if you were wanting to guide him away from TMC, in fact it sounded something like sour grapes. You finally came around to the truth though, so I am glad of that. That part about "it's just a lot more than you think" is golden! I think you realize that now, and it is good advice for anyone just getting started in this career.

Chicon, I wish you the best, but I think this introduction into trucking has taken you a little bit by surprise. It happens to many of us. I hope you can adjust and make an enjoyable career out of it, but if you can't, please don't do as some, and make a career out of pointing out all the ways that you have been done wrong by the trucking companies.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Chicon's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Parrothead66 I will pay attention and do the best I can before making a decision to leave. I know that I have been here at my current job for 2.5 years before I decided that I had, had enough of the crap they giving me. Definitely will do my best for a year and if all works out well then I will stay for sure. 1st year is always the toughest too, so we will have to see.

Well, Chicon, I guess I will see how I can fair with TMC for a year unless I decide to go work with another company. I will probably go through the list one more time before making a final decision. I definitely want to recheck Melton, Decker, and Werner before I make my final decision. Have you all heard anything about Melton, Decker and Werner?

My buddy was pushing me towards TMC to start with, I told him that I was leaning towards Melton. " I've never heard of them he said" well about 2 hours later he was calling me with another of his buddys on the phone. This guy had worked at Melton, had nothing bad to say except, that you tarp everything, but that you are going to make very good money. Like I said earlier, I had already bought my plane ticket to go to Melton, but ended up at TMC, just for the simple fact that their training is second to none. And as far as the "urban legends" , they are not.

Chicon's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I can tell you that they could possibly blackmail you if you happen to decide that you don't want to do OTR or flatbed or that someone died and you need time off from training to attend the funeral.

double-quotes-end.png

Okay, I read what you said about this in another thread, and I think your word of blackmail is a little strong here. They just laid out the facts for you. They said you could quit, and not get your last check, which is explained in orientation paperwork (yes, I've been there, and I know how this works), or they could release you but you could probably expect something negative on your DAC. That is not blackmail, when they fire you they put the reason why on your DAC. Quitting has consequences, and so does failure - get over it man! The truth here is found somewhere in the middle of all your remarks, and I think this statement comes the closest to the truth of anything you've stated so far... "if you happen to decide that you don't want to do OTR or flatbed."

Look, if you decide you don't like it that is all fine and good, but don't go blaming the company for that. And companies have policies on funeral leave. I don't know the specifics at TMC, but I can tell you that most companies don't allow you to take a week off for a friend's death, expecially whil you are on a trainer's truck! It is sad to lose a friend, no one will argue with that, but as a brand new employee who is already "at risk" you made a big blunder by just sending an email and then expecting that to suffice for you to take a week off. I don't think most company policies allow a week off for even a family members death. Now, had you been a well established, proven driver, with an excellent track record, this would have all been handled differently. But as a rookie in training, you really expected to get the kid glove treatment? Chicon, you made some big mistakes, and now you are going to face the consequences.

double-quotes-start.png

I can also tell you that they do know what they are doing and they are very good at it.

double-quotes-end.png

Well, you redeemed yourself with that statement, congratulations! You just had to get some of that bitter taste out of your mouth first I guess.

double-quotes-start.png

I'm not telling you any of this to guide you away from it. It's just a lot more to it than you think there is.

double-quotes-end.png

Well, it certainly sounded as if you were wanting to guide him away from TMC, in fact it sounded something like sour grapes. You finally came around to the truth though, so I am glad of that. That part about "it's just a lot more than you think" is golden! I think you realize that now, and it is good advice for anyone just getting started in this career.

Chicon, I wish you the best, but I think this introduction into trucking has taken you a little bit by surprise. It happens to many of us. I hope you can adjust and make an enjoyable career out of it, but if you can't, please don't do as some, and make a career out of pointing out all the ways that you have been done wrong by the trucking companies.

Old School, I think there's times when someone should read a while post before they respond, maybe you did that or maybe you just took it out of context. I posted what I did the way I did to get his attention. People always like to tell you what you want to hear first , then might throw so not so good in the mix. I chose to be blunt. Things I said are true, am I pointing a finger, yeah I am. I knew some of what to expect before I got there. Things I said, like they all still think their in the military, that didn't bother me, that was just letting him know. As far as taking a week off. They tell you that if something happens and you need to take a week off (because you have to take a week ,because your on a trainers truck) then it's on you and it's just going to make it a week longer before you get your truck. I'm sorry if you think that my using of the word "blackmail" was strong, but that's the what it was. I didn't choose to quit, they made that choice for me. That's really the only thing I'm sour about toward them. Things happen in life that are beyond our control. Did I think that an email would suffice? At the time, it had to, it was a Sunday and I couldn't let anyone but my driver trainer know by phone and he was understanding and said the he to would get in touch with the driver manager and let him know what was going on.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 8 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More