Winter Question My Dad Warned Me About

Topic 17512 | Page 2

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Reaper's Comment
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That was what he told me but he also was only local and his company had way too many trailers with so few tractors. Very little freight so i wasnt sure what was going on with that.

G-Town's Comment
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A few things here...first of all Reaper your concern about trailer roof snow is rather premature...you haven't started step one, yet you are concerned about this? Take this "one day", and "one thing" at a time. Worry about snow on the trailer roof is wasted energy and adding stress to your existing situation. Millions of drivers handle snow every day during the winter season. If we can do it, so can you. Right?

Okay...like it or not a trooper can ticket us for chunks of snow and ice flying off the trailer roof. Just because it hasn't happened to an individual doesn't mean that it won't.

Second, snow on the roof adds weight, potentially a couple of extra tons.

At the Walmart DC where I work, we are required to clear accumulated snow from any trailer we take for store deliveries. An inch or more they require a pass under the snow scrapper. We run heavy, an extra 1500 pounds (for instance) on the roof can create an overweight situation.

I do agree, it can be difficult finding these snow removal machines. However many of the places we backhaul from have snow scrappers tucked away in a remote corner of the yard. Nestle' comes to mind as an example. If need be, ask the shipping clerk or guard if they have one and where it's located.

Rick S.'s Comment
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A few things here...first of all Reaper your concern about trailer roof snow is rather premature...you haven't started step one, yet you are concerned about this? Take this "one day", and "one thing" at a time. Worry about snow on the trailer roof is wasted energy and adding stress to your existing situation. Millions of drivers handle snow every day during the winter season. If we can do it, so can you. Right?

Okay...like it or not a trooper can ticket us for chunks of snow and ice flying off the trailer roof. Just because it hasn't happened to an individual doesn't mean that it won't.

Second, snow on the roof adds weight, potentially a couple of extra tons.

At the Walmart DC where I work, we are required to clear accumulated snow from any trailer we take for store deliveries. An inch or more they require a pass under the snow scrapper. We run heavy, an extra 1500 pounds (for instance) on the roof can create an overweight situation.

I do agree, it can be difficult finding these snow removal machines. However many of the places we backhaul from have snow scrappers tucked away in a remote corner of the yard. Nestle' comes to mind as an example. If need be, ask the shipping clerk or guard if they have one and where it's located.

Wellll. It WAS an interesting question. Actually - probably the first time it's come up HERE, in recent memory at least. So it is a topic of interest.

OTOH - Yeah - kinda PREMATURE from someone who isn't even going to orientation/school until April.

Seems Reaper has LOTS OF FREE TIME on his hands.

Hadn't even considered personally, that snow/ice on the roof of a trailer, would throw a load that was close to over, WAY OVER if the snow didn't fly off, before you rolled a scale.

I'm surprised more truck stops, shippers/receivers and even WEIGH STATIONS in the "snow belt", aren't equipped with scrapers. I've seen telescoping squeegee-type scrapers on the interwebs- but it doesn't look like it would be much fun to try and scrape 450 sqft of snow off the top of a trailer. Prolly as much fun as throwing chains (depending on the weather). You could find a "yard yokel" (kinda like a "lot lizard" - you know, the guy that'll sweep your trailer out for $5-10) to do it for you. Though I wouldn't ask anyone to climb up on your roof.

Rick

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Reaper's Comment
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I do have a bit extra free time. And its questions that come up when i talk to my dad and grandfather. I am studying hard as i can, but we all gotta take some time to ourselves, whether that is an hour a day, or even just a few minutes. Studying 24/7 is impoasible to learn and its even bad for learning. I actually record myself reading the manuals on a voice recorder then i listen to it when i drive and when im home doing chores and stuff. Its a trick i used when i had to learn half a school years worth of info for a midterm.

(We had sub teachers everyday because the teacher decided to no call no show the whole school year. The subs didjt have any lesson plan so we had movies or a free period every day. Unfortunetely due to lack of communication between facalty, they still expected us to complete the midterm but not the final. This is how i did it and i still remember half the info to this day.)

Brett Aquila's Comment
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I am studying hard as i can

This is where the expression "work smarter, not harder" comes into play. You've only completed 6% of the High Road Training Program and haven't touched it in 6 weeks!

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Have you not heard many, many times from everyone how highly effective and super easy to use our program is? Not only does it have the CDL manual built right in, but several sections we've put together ourselves from scratch that are critical to doing your job out there like Learning The Logbook Rules and Truck Weight & Balance.

Reading the manual to yourself is ok, but the adaptive learning system we've put together which analyzes your scores throughout the program and reviews the questions you're struggling with the most is far more effective.

Here is how our High Road breaks down:

To Get Your CDL Permit:

  • Rules & Regulations
  • Driving Safely
  • Transporting Cargo Safely
  • Air Brakes
  • Combination Vehicles
  • Pre-Trip Inspection
  • Driving Exam

To get your CDL endorsements which are optional but highly recommend:

  • Transporting Passengers
  • Doubles And Triples
  • Tankers
  • Hazardous Materials

Two sections we've built ourselves with info you'll need for everyday life on the road:

  • Logbook
  • Weight & Balance

Two sections for anyone considering flatbed:

  • Cargo Securement
  • New York State Coil Endorsement

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

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