The Biggest Reason People Stop Driving A Truck?

Topic 17514 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
A. H. Herzog's Comment
member avatar

I keep seeing talk about loneliness and the solitary lifestyle being the worst thing about trucking. And here I was worried about steep grades runaway trucks with roasted brakes while its snowing or backing a 100k+ piece of equipment into another 100k+ piece of equipment. Exploding tankers full of God knows what. But it looks like sitting with yourself for hours on end is the real occupational downside for most folks. I'd ask if people were serious but judging from all of the articles and posts about it its a real thing. Any thoughts?

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jonathan T.'s Comment
member avatar

I may just be one of the lucky few. I don't get lonely out here, homesick yes but Lonely no. I've got a handful of other drivers that I talk to on the phone with everyday and we give each other support so I never get lonely but I do miss home at times. I've no family though so that may help my situation.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

It's a tough lifestyle being an otr truck driver. It takes a special breed to be a truck driving man and man is Merle Haggard right. I am an introvert so I enjoy being alone it helps me think and I really like getting to know myself. Also, another thing, is that it is called a lifestyle because there is not a whole lot of work/life balance. A lot of time is spent working out here. Some people rather just put in 40 hrs and have the weekend off.

This is not a job for a family man. This industry can destroy families. Being away for a long period can be rough. I just have myself to worry about so it's not that difficult.

Lastly a lot of rookies quit before they even get started. Mainly because of high expectations and thinking it's an easy check. That's why it's recommended to do a year before deciding to quit.

Your worries are good to have. A little fear is healthy, just don't let it take over. It gets better as you learn more. We never stop learning out here!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Im an introvert too and love being in the truck. I would enjoy the OTR lifestyle if I was single, but I'm a family man and love my wife and kids dearly. Kids need their daddy, especially little girls. Thankfully I'm a linehaul driver and am home every day. If all I had to choose from with trucking was OTR, I'd have to hang up the keys. Life is too short to not spend it with your family. I'd find another way to support them.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I keep seeing talk about loneliness and the solitary lifestyle being the worst thing about trucking. And here I was worried about steep grades runaway trucks with roasted brakes while its snowing or backing a 100k+ piece of equipment into another 100k+ piece of equipment. Exploding tankers full of God knows what. But it looks like sitting with yourself for hours on end is the real occupational downside for most folks. I'd ask if people were serious but judging from all of the articles and posts about it its a real thing. Any thoughts?

Herzog, you've watched too many movies and TV shows. These things happen, but they're rare events. The main reason people quit early is your assumption about separation and lonliness. Companies mostly hire and train just about anyone with a CDL permit and a DOT physical. Then these people run into the realities: separation, lonliness, cramped quarters, responsibility of your own without someone watching you, stuff like that.

But the successful ones find a job like no other, the adventure of the open roads, the challenge of the driving, the weather and mountains -- the wonder of it all. There's about 20 million of those drivers on the road today. And they're coming back tomorrow to do it all again.

(Do you know Werner H.?)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Werner Herzog. Awesome director. Love German films. Nosferatu.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

I enjoy the alone time, I have a good schedule though. I'm NW regional now and I have the option to be home every weekend but I will stay out longer often.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

I enjoy the alone time, I have a good schedule though. I'm NW regional now and I have the option to be home every weekend but I will stay out longer often.

Chris, you still with Prime?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I'd say it's probably a lack of home time, not making the money they'd hope for right off the bat, getting fired or a combination of those things. I don't think someone who needed to be around people all the time would even sign up but who knows.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

No, I'm with a small company now 2 trucks owner drives one. Pulling a dry van now. I still however miss my truck I had with Prime. Only left Prime due to family needing me home more, I used to stay out 2 to 3 months at a time with Prime.

double-quotes-start.png

I enjoy the alone time, I have a good schedule though. I'm NW regional now and I have the option to be home every weekend but I will stay out longer often.

double-quotes-end.png

Chris, you still with Prime?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More