California State

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Jim D.'s Comment
member avatar

Many years ago I used to be a truck mechanic in WA state. Also had a combination licence that was same as a class A in CA state. My Question is this cool study guide from Truckingtruth. Does it prepare a person for the CDL test in CA State? Laws are so different in this state. For example Doubles were not legal here for some time. Now can not get a straight answer if doubles are legal now in CA. Anyone know if this class is OK for Prep for CA CDL for bus and Trucks. Jim

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Doubles are legal - triples aren't.

Ca dot Gov Doubles Endorsement Page

The page pretty much reads the same as what we have on here (we have WAY MORE DETAIL here @ TT).

So studying the Doubles/Triples Section here - should more than adequately prep you for the CA test.

This is an endorsement that VERY FEW OF US HERE will ever get to use. Line-Haul Drivers typically run doubles - I think we have one guy her (6-String) that does this type of work.

Bus requires the PASSENGER ENDORSEMENT - and also requires you to do a Pre-Trip and Road Test IN A BUS - it's not just a written endorsement.

Otherwise - the TT CDL Course is generic enough that we've had users in all 48 states pass easily using it. Texas has some "weird, state-particular-stuff" on it's general knowledge tests - everywhere else pretty much conforms to the Federal Standards for CDL testing.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Jim D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you Rick No kidding I was told (at a local CDL school ) No doubles in CA state. I thought I had seen some in Northern CA hauling tomatoes but that was a few years ago. I again thank you for the Answer and will take this course. I miss the trucking industry. Been a few years but want to go back to it. Computers are cool but sitting in an office all Day I found myself thinking of trucks. Since I used to drive and do miss it and used to be a diesel Mechanic and miss that as well but driving was by far my favourite. Wrenching was too much like the office. I want back behind the wheel. Thanks Jim

Doubles are legal - triples aren't.

Ca dot Gov Doubles Endorsement Page

The page pretty much reads the same as what we have on here (we have WAY MORE DETAIL here @ TT).

So studying the Doubles/Triples Section here - should more than adequately prep you for the CA test.

This is an endorsement that VERY FEW OF US HERE will ever get to use. Line-Haul Drivers typically run doubles - I think we have one guy her (6-String) that does this type of work.

Bus requires the PASSENGER ENDORSEMENT - and also requires you to do a Pre-Trip and Road Test IN A BUS - it's not just a written endorsement.

Otherwise - the TT CDL Course is generic enough that we've had users in all 48 states pass easily using it. Texas has some "weird, state-particular-stuff" on it's general knowledge tests - everywhere else pretty much conforms to the Federal Standards for CDL testing.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Terminal Rat ( aka...J's Comment
member avatar

I personally used the High Road training program here to pass my CDL test here in California and had no problems passing whatsoever.

JJ

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Here's the link and here's what our High Road Training Program covers:

To Get Your CDL Permit:

  • Rules & Regulations
  • Driving Safely
  • Transporting Cargo Safely
  • Air Brakes
  • Combination Vehicles
  • Pre-Trip Inspection
  • Driving Exam

To get your CDL endorsements which are optional but highly recommend:

  • Transporting Passengers
  • Doubles And Triples
  • Tankers
  • Hazardous Materials

Two sections we've built ourselves with info you'll need for everyday life on the road:

  • Logbook
  • Weight & Balance

Two sections for anyone considering flatbed:

  • Cargo Securement
  • New York State Coil Endorsement

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Rick No kidding I was told (at a local CDL school ) No doubles in CA state. I thought I had seen some in Northern CA hauling tomatoes but that was a few years ago. I again thank you for the Answer and will take this course. I miss the trucking industry. Been a few years but want to go back to it. Computers are cool but sitting in an office all Day I found myself thinking of trucks. Since I used to drive and do miss it and used to be a diesel Mechanic and miss that as well but driving was by far my favourite. Wrenching was too much like the office. I want back behind the wheel. Thanks Jim

double-quotes-start.png

Doubles are legal - triples aren't.

Ca dot Gov Doubles Endorsement Page

The page pretty much reads the same as what we have on here (we have WAY MORE DETAIL here @ TT).

So studying the Doubles/Triples Section here - should more than adequately prep you for the CA test.

This is an endorsement that VERY FEW OF US HERE will ever get to use. Line-Haul Drivers typically run doubles - I think we have one guy her (6-String) that does this type of work.

Bus requires the PASSENGER ENDORSEMENT - and also requires you to do a Pre-Trip and Road Test IN A BUS - it's not just a written endorsement.

Otherwise - the TT CDL Course is generic enough that we've had users in all 48 states pass easily using it. Texas has some "weird, state-particular-stuff" on it's general knowledge tests - everywhere else pretty much conforms to the Federal Standards for CDL testing.

Rick

double-quotes-end.png

If a local school said that, I would run as far away from them as possible. The state where you will probably see the most doubles is California from dry bulk tankers, belly dumps, dry vans, flatbed, I seen it all in California when it comes to double trailers.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar
If a local school said that, I would run as far away from them as possible. The state where you will probably see the most doubles is California from dry bulk tankers, belly dumps, dry vans, flatbed, I seen it all in California when it comes to double trailers.

In fact - one of our members here - drives a double-tanker gasoline rig, that delivers to gas stations (after 2 years driving Prime Reefer). Lives around Sacramento.

BUT....

Mark your calendars - I am going to STAND CORRECTED. Doesn't happen very often.

Doubles/Triples are referred to as "Longer Combination Vehicles" - since I didn't see any notes on them for CA in my 2-17 Rand McNally Motor Carrier Atlas - I googled "Longer Combination Vehicles" and found THIS:

CalTrans (DOT) Longer Combination Vehicles Are LCVs allowed in California? LCVs are not allowed on California interstates and State routes. LCVs may operate on local streets and roads with permits from local jurisdictions.

I'll dig a little deeper when I get home, maybe tap Daniel B - since he drives one.

California DOES have to offer the endorsement on it's CDL's - because folks holding a CA CDL , may need to drive a double at some point in their career - even if it isn't in Cali...

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

If a local school said that, I would run as far away from them as possible. The state where you will probably see the most doubles is California from dry bulk tankers, belly dumps, dry vans, flatbed, I seen it all in California when it comes to double trailers.

double-quotes-end.png

In fact - one of our members here - drives a double-tanker gasoline rig, that delivers to gas stations (after 2 years driving Prime Reefer). Lives around Sacramento.

BUT....

Mark your calendars - I am going to STAND CORRECTED. Doesn't happen very often.

Doubles/Triples are referred to as "Longer Combination Vehicles" - since I didn't see any notes on them for CA in my 2-17 Rand McNally Motor Carrier Atlas - I googled "Longer Combination Vehicles" and found THIS:

CalTrans (DOT) Longer Combination Vehicles Are LCVs allowed in California? LCVs are not allowed on California interstates and State routes. LCVs may operate on local streets and roads with permits from local jurisdictions.

I'll dig a little deeper when I get home, maybe tap Daniel B - since he drives one.

California DOES have to offer the endorsement on it's CDL's - because folks holding a CA CDL , may need to drive a double at some point in their career - even if it isn't in Cali...

Rick

I can guarantee you that doubles are legal on all the same roads that a single 53' trailer is. I'm in California at least twice a week, and I see them everywhere. Tankers, AG trucks, dry bulk, Fed Ex/UPS/Saia/ABF/OD etc., you name it. State highways, US routes, interstates, side roads. The only time they're not allowed is when specifically prohibited through chain control areas for traction reasons, and then it's the single-screw daycabs that are stopped. Twin-screw tractors are still allowed to chain and go.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Vendingdude's Comment
member avatar

You mean all those doubles UPS and FEDEX drivers I pass on my weekly runs to L.A. are illegal? Whoda think it?

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Okeee - took a minute to find it. As with everything else "California" - they just have to be spayshul about everything...

http://www.dot.ca.gov/trafficops/trucks/docs/ca-legal-doubles.pdf

^^^^^^ That's a PDF of legal truck lengths.

"California Legal Doubles" - appear to only allow two trailers of 28 FEET EACH, as maximum length for a doubles set. There are NO TRIPLES ALLOWED.

Vehicle Lengths - Summarized here are the California Vehicle Code (CVC) sections related to vehicle lengths. <-- Is the California Code for all vehicle lengths.

The "seeming exception" to the 28' doubles - would be "B-Trains" - which are different from standard doubles in how the trailer tandems are constructed for the lead trailer. The trailer tandems have a 3rd single axle and 5th wheel for the 2nd trailer, as part of the first trailer.

http://www.dot.ca.gov/trafficops/trucks/docs/b-train.pdf

^^^^^^ You really aren't going to see whole lot of B-Trains here in the US - though they are popular in Canada & other countries.

A/B/C style trailer hookups explained in more detail here: About A/B/C Doubles

California Truck Lengths, KPRA (kingpin to rear axle) and route restrictions. http://www.dot.ca.gov/trafficops/trucks/docs/truck-legend.pdf

Lots of info there to digest - but I think that pretty much covers doubles and California.

Rickipedia Out...

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

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