Backing Exercise - How Would You Backup To This Door?

Topic 17824 | Page 1

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Scott L. aka Lawdog's Comment
member avatar

This is from a recent Dollar Tree drop I had, I ended up in a complete "jack-knife" position over the curb (next to electrical box)....here is a pic from google and some notes, also the address is: 148 E University Pkwy, Orem, UT 84058

There was one thing I didn't do, but only realized it after that fact.

Note: Photo and Link buttons not working properly....link below for JPEG with Notes:

https://goo.gl/photos/yh7eUGi33h6N9ZWX6

Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah, tight spot. Looks like it might be easier to blind side it. Fortunately, I very rarely have to do anything like that. But I'm just going to take a guess and say that the thing you didn't do is slide your tandems forward.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

God that's a NASTY DOCK.

I would have come in from the OTHER SIDE (200E versus Main Street) - Pulled to where your 3nd arrow from the left is, to setup for a blind side - and done about 30 pull-ups to get it straight.

There's a trick an old trucker showed me, in a tight dock like this. You UNLOCK YOUR TANDEMS - use the tandem brakes to slide them while you're moving. I thought it was SO COOL - I asked him to show me again in SLOW MOTION.

So you unlock, get your setup - hold the brake while backing - which essentially SHORTENS your wheelbase (but makes your trailers ass swing REALLY WIDE). But you can "waggle around" your setup, until it's closer to an angled back - then, when you're straight into the dock hole, hold the brake and pull forward to slide your tandems BACK to the normal position.

He called it "power sliding". Don't forget to LOCK YOUR TANDEMS after you finish sliding around with them.

Next time you're in a yard - or a big empty lot - try it out.

In a situation like this - you get your tandems about where you want them - then slide them forward (push the box back) so the tandems don't move - your wheelbase gets shorter, so you don't have to jackknife into the planter to get backed.

Rick

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Did you not dip over to the left across from the electrical box when you were setting up? Having not done so would have made you close to the fence when you went to straighten up. And I don't think blindsiding this would have helped. But sliding the tandems will usually make moving around in tight spots a little easier.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Scott L. aka Lawdog's Comment
member avatar

To left of the big electrical box there is also concrete retaining walls (where dumpsters should go) so it was impossible to move any closer to the fence. Also about two feet on each side of the stairs there are are barrier poles.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

After looking at Google maps satellite view I might have been wrong about not being easier to blindside it but I'm not sure. (Can't tell if their is an empty spot in front of the hole or if it's a shadow)

Mr M's Comment
member avatar

I havnt had to do this yet but you could have slid all the way forward and if needed released the with tail in pulled up to bring tandem all the way back moving the tractor but leaving trailer in locked tandem then straight backed in

Yeah, tight spot. Looks like it might be easier to blind side it. Fortunately, I very rarely have to do anything like that. But I'm just going to take a guess and say that the thing you didn't do is slide your tandems forward.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Scott L. aka Lawdog's Comment
member avatar

Apologize for slow reply to your replies been busy running this dedicated. I slid my tandems but not forward enough. The other thing I failed to mention was there was snow piles 7-10' high all around. Blind side wasn't possible, I had to "shimy" around the building just to leave. I thought about moving my sliding 5th wheel forward to but I have a roller rack attached to my frame and knew I would have an issue.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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