Super Flatbedders Could I Get Some Advice

Topic 17904 | Page 1

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Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

So I know we have a lot of flat bedders on this forum, and since I am going into flatbedding, I was wondering if I could get some advice from some of the best Flatbedders on this forum. This thread is meant to help those who in the future who follow the path that I am and so many trucker's have already taken. So if I can get a whole lot of advice on this thread like Daniel has gotten on his flatbed variety, I know it would be very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Renegade's Comment
member avatar

So I know we have a lot of flat bedders on this forum, and since I am going into flatbedding, I was wondering if I could get some advice from some of the best Flatbedders on this forum. This thread is meant to help those who in the future who follow the path that I am and so many trucker's have already taken. So if I can get a whole lot of advice on this thread like Daniel has gotten on his flatbed variety, I know it would be very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

When Old School chimes in, you need to listen and pay close attention to the advice he gives you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

OK, that s about as clear as mud. Read it several times and still not sure what you want. You ask for advice but there is no question.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I can give you advice from a rookies perspective if you have more questions. Although I'm at almost 9 months now which is insane.

BTW which company did you settle on?

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

To answer your reply Pat basically I wanted this thread to be full of useful information for those who are just starting out in the trucking career and are considering flatbed. So I.e. how many straps, dunnage, chains etc. would you need on certain loads to be secure. I made this thread because Brett said on Flatbed Variety that we should make another thread where those of you who do flatbed could give advice and tips and make good points about how to make flatbed work for you as a trucker if you are just starting out. I figured I would take him up on that suggestion and make that thread. I hope this explanation helped clear things up Pat sorry about the clear as mud situation lol.

I have settled on TMC as the carrier I am going with C.T. I am very excited!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Ah, The Maverick Cheerleaders or those driving around with Too Much Chrome ;-)

Excellent choice on a flatbed company. Congrats and good luck!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Well thanks Susan! So what advice can you all give concerning orientation and how to make sure my load is super secure so that I don't end up getting a ticket or citation? I want to be to be a super flatbedder just like you all!

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Well thanks Susan! So what advice can you all give concerning orientation and how to make sure my load is super secure so that I don't end up getting a ticket or citation? I want to be to be a super flatbedder just like you all!

Go to this link: High Road Load Securement

Pay close attention during your Training and when you take to the road with your Trainer. The Company has a VERY IMPORTANT interest in you securing your loads properly. They don't want Pictures of their Cargo and Equipment on the 6 o clock news!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Charlie Mac's Comment
member avatar

TMC has some nice looking trucks! I've a buddy who went to school with me that recently went flatbed. (Gypsum Express).

The first thing he told me he noticed was the turning ratio. Apparently the trailer doesn't respond to your input as quickly/sharply as a van.

Wish I could give you more. Best of luck! 👍

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes the spread axle is a little different than tandems. You try and make a uturn too tightly and you'll flip it right over. As for orientation I'd say you should definitely relax. When I got to Maverick I heard of stories online of course of people being sent home for walking on grass, being a minute late to class, doing anything wrong. They addressed all those things immediately. Basically, be an adult. Show up expecting to work hard and earn your way to the job. Take everything seriously as it's essentially a job interview in progress. Also, take notes on everything you can. When I went solo I looked like a mad scientist rummaging through my notes to find how I needed to secure my load. Looked silly but it got me through it.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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