First Year Pay Totals With Prime

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Rainy D.'s Comment
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Https://www.facebook.com/primeincreview/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE&fref=nf

This lovely lady posts her pay stubs from prime. Any thoughts on accuracy? I dunno Im headed to prime in two weeks. Just thought this might help people out.

Its a little decieving because she looks to be on a walmart Northeast regional account. They usually drive lightweights which get an extra 5cpm plus an additional 5cpm for the Northeast. So whereas a condo OTR driver makes 41.5 cpm , the lightweight NE regionals are making 51.5 cpm. Her miles aren't much for most weeks.

Some are on a "guarantee". So if the truck makes X amount of dollars per week in revenue, the driver is guaranteed $1250 per week. If you notice every once in awhile she gets " equalization pay" which I have only seen on regional drivers but no one explained to.me. I'm guessing that has to do with the guarantee.

Although she has Texas loads, they are given to get her out of the Springfield terminal , then she goes back to the Midwest/northeast. There's one where it looks like she flew from PA to Texas, then did runs in TX then back to northeast...I say that cause she wound up in PA with no load going to TX. But did a couple walmarts, then back to MI. That one has me stumped unless she scanned it late and it was from a previous week when she was in TX.

She's driving a 2014 Cascadia and keeps scanning her trips late which eliminates her fuel bonus. She's been driving over a year according to her insurance , but what's weird is she only got $500 for vacation and we have been upped to $700.

If you are asking if this is the typical new driver OTR pay...no it isn't. Does that mean you would make less? No it doesn't. If you are asking if you could get that account as a newbie..you could but I wouldn't recommend it. Tight stores to drive and back.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Christian R.'s Comment
member avatar

Yea clarification would help people out more. She seems pretty open about her pay and miles. Maybe Ill shoot her a message and ask her what she exactly does for prime, just so other people can have some real world data. Alot of different information out here. I signed up for reefer ot all 48 states I just want to go be a wanderer for awhile.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Yea clarification would help people out more. She seems pretty open about her pay and miles. Maybe Ill shoot her a message and ask her what she exactly does for prime, just so other people can have some real world data. Alot of different information out here. I signed up for reefer ot all 48 states I just want to go be a wanderer for awhile.

Well...have a "can do" attitude. Plan to be everywhere as early as possible. If you get a load that picks up the next day...drive there now. Ask the customer if you can pick it up early..if not park there or close by to have as much time on your clock to get a great jump on miles once.loaded.

Form a bind with your FM so he can trust you. And don't bug him by calling every ten minutes. Newbies have plenty of questions which is fine. Either ask in an email or on the QC so they can prioritize and handle emergency stuff like accidents then answer you when they have time.

The ones who don't get complain, don't make up excuses for late loads and get there early get the long hauls. Good luck

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Christian R.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the great advice Rainy! I love learning new things to make me more succesful! Be safe out there and Ill let you know more details about the other ladies exact situation when she responds.

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Yea clarification would help people out more. She seems pretty open about her pay and miles. Maybe Ill shoot her a message and ask her what she exactly does for prime, just so other people can have some real world data. Alot of different information out here. I signed up for reefer ot all 48 states I just want to go be a wanderer for awhile.

double-quotes-end.png

Well...have a "can do" attitude. Plan to be everywhere as early as possible. If you get a load that picks up the next day...drive there now. Ask the customer if you can pick it up early..if not park there or close by to have as much time on your clock to get a great jump on miles once.loaded.

Form a bind with your FM so he can trust you. And don't bug him by calling every ten minutes. Newbies have plenty of questions which is fine. Either ask in an email or on the QC so they can prioritize and handle emergency stuff like accidents then answer you when they have time.

The ones who don't get complain, don't make up excuses for late loads and get there early get the long hauls. Good luck

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
Form a bind with your FM

I would recommend a "bond"

smile.gifrofl-3.gif

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

The sunshine of this group is going to burn tractor man for that last comment!!! Lol

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

Regarding the woman posting her settlements: it's not the NE regional account. I never went to those stores and most of those states. She might be out of the Olney, IL distribution center and running some sort of regional account from around there.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Regarding the woman posting her settlements: it's not the NE regional account. I never went to those stores and most of those states. She might be out of the Olney, IL distribution center and running some sort of regional account from around there.

Yeah I couldn't figure it out...but she's definitely running in walmart towns. But going from MI to CT, PA NY... Its definitely not OTR though.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, it's weird. The equalization pay is exactly what you said it was. It's the little extra bits that take us to the guaranteed gross earnings. It's a good system if you're running a route where you're not getting a ton of miles like you would be running OTR.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

Just out of curiosity , went to visit a client today who is a load broker, he got an order for a 19000 lbs load from Michigan going to Florida for $1900.00 , then he turned around and gave the load to an owner operator for $1600.00. Is that owner after his expenses going to make a benefit?

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

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