Schneider Intermodal Question

Topic 18986 | Page 1

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Richard K.'s Comment
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Can anyone on the forum that works for Schneider Intermodal in Chicago answer this question? I was looking at this position on Schneiders website and in the job description it says that it is daily home time and drivers make up to $75,000 per year. It says that you will haul containers within 225 miles of Chicago. How is this possible?

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Cold War Surplus's Comment
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Schneider intermodal was my, "plan B" so I seriously looked into it recently. If you hustle, you can make three deliveries a day. You get cpm , $35 per delivery, a fee for hooking and unhooking and a couple of other fees. You can generally come in on your days off too for extra money. A good driver in a busy market can clear ~$300/a day.

Chicago is a busy yard. Schneider sends their new intermodal drivers there for training.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't drive for Schneider (I'm a Swiftie). But I do a daily 256 mile run (512 miles round trip). Takes about 10 hours. So the 225 mile limit is doable on a daily basis.

Richard K.'s Comment
member avatar

They have an intermodal position that is regional , hauling within 335 miles of Chicago, home weekly I was thinking about. Says you can make $80,000. I live about 20 minutes from the terminal. Do you think I could make it home more than once a week?

Schneider intermodal was my, "plan B" so I seriously looked into it recently. If you hustle, you can make three deliveries a day. You get cpm , $35 per delivery, a fee for hooking and unhooking and a couple of other fees. You can generally come in on your days off too for extra money. A good driver in a busy market can clear ~$300/a day.

Chicago is a busy yard. Schneider sends their new intermodal drivers there for training.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Richard K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Errol V.!

I don't drive for Schneider (I'm a Swiftie). But I do a daily 256 mile run (512 miles round trip). Takes about 10 hours. So the 225 mile limit is doable on a daily basis.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
They have an intermodal position that is regional , hauling within 335 miles of Chicago, home weekly I was thinking about. Says you can make $80,000. I live about 20 minutes from the terminal. Do you think I could make it home more than once a week?

Very likely yes, but if you do it would only be for the night. It looks like they probably run you hard through the week and give you a 34 at home each week.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I ran intermodal at prime in Chicago and will tell you not to bother looking at them for this. I was in training and prime only uses lease ops for it. At $1.08 per mile plus fuel surcharge. We ran from the two rail yards to Anderson IN, a couple walmarts, then a few drop yards in the area. He ran 500 miles per day and could go home for his 10hr break. The reason he did it was to see his grandkids, but that didn't work out. By the time he got done it was 2000 and he had to be back at work by 0600. So basically they were asleep when he got home and might just be waking when he walked out the door. Taking the 34 at home is doable though.

Also, he wasn't making money which is why he took me as a student then ran us so hard I almost strangled him. And the two weeks I was with him he never went home. He was probably terrible with money anyway. I have a friend running intermodal with prime in PA and he does fine, but home time is still limited.

Also keep in mind our drop yards there were TIGHT!!! The rail yards and customers were OK cause most were drop and hook , and wide room to back. But the yards..I don't know if I could back in them even now 18 mos later

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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