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Renegade's Comment
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"Your thought was echoed?" You need to read your CDL manual one more time buddy because that thought is echoed among every safe and responsible driver including the DOT. The crucial point YOU'RE missing Danielsahn is that if you rely on someone else to determine whether your truck is safe and legal to operate, then you've got a lot of future tickets waiting on you out there pal. I'm no expert in trucking but what I have learned listening to the experts and reading the CDL material is that the most important part of being a truck driver is being safe. Nobody was jumping on Steven about it and nobody is jumping on you either, but you can't exactly point fingers at the company and say that they're the reason why you're driving an unsafe truck if you didn't take time to do a proper pre-trip inspection. See what DOT's response is when you say "well my company said it was safe to drive".

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BQ 's Comment
member avatar

Danielsahn, your according to your status you are simply "preparing for school" at this point, what exactly do you know about what can or cannot be determined from a proper pretrip inspection? Rainy is 100% correct here, the driver is responsible and most things that would determine a truck illegal can be found during said pretrip, particularly those mentioned by O/P. I don't always agree 100% with everyone here but to argue about something you have 0 experience with vs people who do is just asinine.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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I just find it funny, that despite a lengthy explanation, only certain parts of my post were picked at.

CDL manual, yes I have read it, a few times now. But that has nothing to do with why I said what I did. I only stated that someone should have asked for some more detail. I even said, that I could be wrong. But I also said in my initial post, that yes, the driver is ultimately responsible.

Brett, you obviously missed the part where I stated that I have a ton of respect for, you, old school, and others. I questioned your tact, yes. I only said that if I want to learn the pitfalls of leasing or owning, I will ask someone who has done it. Your Knowledge of being a successful company driver, is amazing.

I questioned old school's somewhat misleading statement of being a fleet owner. He had job specific trucks, just like I did. I definitely relate to his "money pit" analogy. But unless the reader already knows, it comes across that he owned several "industry trucks," which he did not. If I can run half as hard as he does, using his invaluable tricks, I will be a happy fella.

Appearance, and how you present yourself, is everything, you have said so yourself. Just like in your new podcast, which was great, btw. I am just saying how it appears to me.

Is Rainy a professional? Yes, like I said in my post she has given some great information, that I have learned from. I am just not a fan of how she appears, to me.

You have criticized a plethora of people in here, all in the name of "educating us." but I guess it is OK when you do it, or a moderator does it, because it is your site.

And Brett, the "you will do great..." sarcasm is pure bull poop. You love to take personal shots, whenever you can, it seems. Yes, I took a personal shot at Rainy, and Rainy, I apologize. That was beneath me. I let an unrelated aggravation color my response.

I know I will do my best to be a top tier driver, because of what I have learned here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Rainy wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

My question is why did you move the illegal truck? I would have been sitting right there at that yard until fixed properly.

double-quotes-end.png

A valid question (DanielSahn) asked in a non-aggressive way. I would not have moved that truck and if a cursory PTI is performed, the problems mentioned are all detectable. I would have called road assist and gotten it fixed on the spot. My a** if DOT flags me into an inspection.

So Steven...were your forced to move the truck?

DanielSahn...way out of line bud...

If rainy had responded to my post like that, all this other crap could have been avoided. There are some, well, a lot of things I still have yet to learn.

And yes, I was out of line. Again, sorry Rainy.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
If rainy had responded to my post like that, all this other crap could have been avoided.

The only crap here was the unwarranted barrage of criticisms you're lobbing at everyone. There were no other problems here. In fact, this was originally a conversation between experienced drivers that you for some reason felt it was your place to insert yourself into. That's where it went off the rails. You were the boulder on the tracks.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Daniesahn, I didn't respond to you the other day becauae I didn't feel your misstep warranted it. Daniel mis-led you completely in his post when he referred to me as once owning a few "box trucks." He contacted me later that day with somewhat of an apology stating "he was just making a joke."

My trucks were Class 8 tractors, most of them stretched to accomodate large cranes. They were licensed combination vehicles requiring a Class A CDL driver. Much of the time we were pulling permitted over size/over weight loads in a five to six state area of steel structures that we had fabricated in our manufacturing plant.

If you're referring to the catering industry when you talk about trucks, then no my trucks were not "industry" trucks.

I stand by my statements and don't consider them misleading, but you are free to think what you like.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar
The only crap here was the unwarranted barrage of criticisms you're lobbing at everyone. There were no other problems here. In fact, this was originally a conversation between experienced drivers that you for some reason felt it was your place to insert yourself into. That's where it went off the rails. You were the boulder on the tracks.

I like how you only quote certain parts, to fit your response. If questioning your tact is being critical, than I am guilty as charged.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar
My trucks were Class 8 tractors, most of them stretched to accomodate large cranes. They were licensed combination vehicles requiring a Class A CDL driver. Much of the time we were pulling permitted over size/over weight loads in a five to six state area of steel structures that we had fabricated in our manufacturing plant.

I stand corrected, and I apologize.

I referred to class a trucks as industry trucks, because I couldn't think of another way to say it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

If questioning your tact is being critical, than I am guilty as charged.

Oh you're guilty of plenty here lately, hero.

In fact, let's waste no time on getting you started with a whole new string of apologies toward Old School, yet another terrific person with tons of experience and success, both in this industry and far beyond, who has spent countless hours going out of his way to help you with anything you've ever asked for help with, for 18 months now, and you kicked him in the teeth and questioned his genuineness and integrity publicly without even knowing the facts.

Did I mention he's also been silently working through cancer in recent years? Yeah, while he's been helping you. Same guy.

What an appalling lack of gratitude.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

.....and you question my tact????

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