What's Your Opinion On Super Singles?

Topic 19080 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Renegade's Comment
member avatar

Here lately as I'm pulling up next to tractors I find myself doing pre-trips in my head, and one thing that I've been seeing on a few tractors have been super singles (mostly on Internationals). What if you lose that tire going down the road at 65-70 mph with a heavy load? It seems dangerous to me but I'm still learning.

Super Singles:

A single, wide wheel substituted for a tandem (two wheel) assembly. The main benefit of a super single is a reduction in weight and lower rolling resistance which provide better fuel economy. The disadvantage is the lack of tire redundancy (or a 'backup tire' in case of a blowout) from which tandem wheels benefit. A tire blowout is more dangerous with a super single and can not be driven on.

Adam B.'s Comment
member avatar

It is more dangerous because if you blow a drive running doubles you can still drive to a shop to get the tire replaced. If you blow a super single, hold on to the wheel and pull off to the wide cause you're not going anywhere.

Super singles exist because they are lighter than doubles on each side so you can hauling more freight.

Super Singles:

A single, wide wheel substituted for a tandem (two wheel) assembly. The main benefit of a super single is a reduction in weight and lower rolling resistance which provide better fuel economy. The disadvantage is the lack of tire redundancy (or a 'backup tire' in case of a blowout) from which tandem wheels benefit. A tire blowout is more dangerous with a super single and can not be driven on.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Renegade's Comment
member avatar

Man...that just seems too risky.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Thoroughly pre-trip your tires and maintain proper inflation. No substitute.

Although I am not a fan of the super-single on the drives, it's for a different reason. Traction. As they wear, they have a tendency to cup, wearing unevenly from the center out to the edges. We have two Central tractors at the DC as spares. They have SS tires, the handling characteristics on dry pavement are equal to that of a dual setup. But in the rain, especially deadheading, another story.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Me no likey. LOL. I've never driven a tractor with super singles but I used to pull trailers with them all the . Never noticed too much of a difference driving, but they wear unevenly like G said. They also tend to get nice cuts and gashes in the tread, much more so than with normal dual tires.

Super Singles:

A single, wide wheel substituted for a tandem (two wheel) assembly. The main benefit of a super single is a reduction in weight and lower rolling resistance which provide better fuel economy. The disadvantage is the lack of tire redundancy (or a 'backup tire' in case of a blowout) from which tandem wheels benefit. A tire blowout is more dangerous with a super single and can not be driven on.

Garth M.'s Comment
member avatar

You would figure they would be more likely to hydro plane

Joshua's Comment
member avatar

A super single blowing could also cause the load to shift making you lose control.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been driving with super singles for over a year now, unfortunately it's the only truck i've had so far so i have nothing to compare it to. I haven't noticed uneven wear, but i do have some gashes and holes in the tread. I've also heard stories of people stuck because one went flat, but i had one go flat when i was around 80,000 lbs and i didn't even notice until i stopped, so i don't know, i do get stuck a lot in snow and mud, but i see that happen just as often to duals. It seems to have more to do with the fact that you can't get power to all 4 drives in our trucks.

Super Singles:

A single, wide wheel substituted for a tandem (two wheel) assembly. The main benefit of a super single is a reduction in weight and lower rolling resistance which provide better fuel economy. The disadvantage is the lack of tire redundancy (or a 'backup tire' in case of a blowout) from which tandem wheels benefit. A tire blowout is more dangerous with a super single and can not be driven on.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

I've been driving on Super singles for about a month and I can definately tell a difference.

You know when you have to much weight on a set of duals and it feels a bit sluggish in the steering? To me it feels like that more often than not. As is I scale almost every load because it feels off.

And even to the point of sticky as far as steering goes.

Super Singles:

A single, wide wheel substituted for a tandem (two wheel) assembly. The main benefit of a super single is a reduction in weight and lower rolling resistance which provide better fuel economy. The disadvantage is the lack of tire redundancy (or a 'backup tire' in case of a blowout) from which tandem wheels benefit. A tire blowout is more dangerous with a super single and can not be driven on.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

I've driven with super singles on the drives and with duals on the drives. I've always had duals on trailers. I noticed going over the mountains in Colorado in snow that the duals seemed to handle better -- better traction, less slippage side to side. I've also had a few flats on duals where I was able to limp it to a truck stop. When you lose a super single, you need to park and have road service come to you, especially loaded.

I did not notice any extra problems with cupping or chunks coming out of the super singles, but then again, I'm a little bit fanatical about having the correct tire pressure. (By the way, have you all checked your tire pressure now that the weather is getting warmer? They might be a little high if you pumped more in while traveling through some -39 F weather in Montana. That can be worse that low tire pressure.)

It will be interesting to see how it goes with my new job, since both the tractor and trailers have super singles. The good part is I won't be doing much (if any) mountain driving; the bad part is that it snows a lot where I'll be running in the winter.

Super Singles:

A single, wide wheel substituted for a tandem (two wheel) assembly. The main benefit of a super single is a reduction in weight and lower rolling resistance which provide better fuel economy. The disadvantage is the lack of tire redundancy (or a 'backup tire' in case of a blowout) from which tandem wheels benefit. A tire blowout is more dangerous with a super single and can not be driven on.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More