4 Car Carrier Summer Job NJ To Florida

Topic 19282 | Page 1

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Joe L.'s Comment
member avatar

I was just offered a job hauling a 4 car carrier from nj to Florida. Work as much as you want, no set delivery time for the cars. I could do that trip in two days. The catch is this, the truck has no sleeper so I'd have to crash in the back seat at a rest area. Does anyone have any idea on how big the back seats are on an e350 semi? I would only be doing this temporarily

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Unless it's modified under 6', about 70".

I hope you have thoroughly researched this company. How are they paying you? What kind of shape is the equipment in?

Sleeping in a vehicle, without the basic creature comforts of a full functioning sleeper? Florida in the summer can be stifling, muggy. How are you going to stay cool while you sleep?

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I smell a 1099/ "independent contractor". This is #1 illegal and #2 very unfair to the employee.

A 350 is a pickup truck with duallies, and technically a "semi", but it's a pickup. If you're around 5' tall, you might fit. But without running your A/C you won't want to spend a Florida night in your back seat.

And you won't be hassled if you pull into a truck stop for the night.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Also - does it have DOT NUMBERS? If it does, are you LOGGING?

If it DOESN'T and you are car hauling cars OTHER THAN WHAT THE OWNER OWNS (as in snowbird car transport) - you are operating a COMMERCIAL VEHICLE, without #'s, without a proper sleeper berth - aka: OUTLAW.

You will eventually get nailed for it (if it's outlaw).

I have friends that haul motorcycles all over the country in a large enclosed trailer on a 5th wheel. They took out the backseat of their F-350 King Cab, built a BED FRAME with 2X4's and plywood, and had a MATTRESS.

A "back seat" does not qualify as a sleeper berth - it has to actually be a BED (however rudimentary it is). You are REQUIRED TO LOG (paper is OK until mid-december this year), you are REQUIRED TO ENTER WEIGH STATIONS (and are SUBJECT TO INSPECTION).

Basically - the same rules would apply to you, as any 18 wheel semi. Lots of companies "run outlaw". Many never get caught. The ones that do, get pimpslapped pretty hard. And YOU THE DRIVER ARE RESPONSIBLE.

If you have ANY PLANS of getting a CDL in the future, you don't want to get jammed up for COMMERCIAL DRIVING OFFENSES.

As attractive as the gig may sound - do your due diligence to MAKE SURE it is 100% LEGIT.

Like I said - plenty of folks outlaw it, and plenty of folks FOLLOW THE REGS.

I'd hate to see you come in here, asking to get out of a jam, because you GOT JAMMED UP.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

ChosenOne's Comment
member avatar

I would go look at their CSA Score for starters, see how they stack up. I had a guy come up to me after school last week, he wanted to know if I was interested in a position. They are a 14 tractor operation and lease their trailers. I looked at their CSA Score, they have a 47% OOS rate for inspections. They also have a high percentage of HOS Violations. No thanks, this tells me either the drivers don't care about the equipment, or the owner does not care, either way I am not risking my CDL , and god forbid, my life or someone elses life while I am behind the wheel. While I can refuse to drive unsafe, if I am refusing to move the truck I am not earning money, and who knows what he will say if I leave and he is called by a perspective employer. I should have known the reason why he was outside in the corner of the parking lot was because he probably would not be let in the door.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Chosen one suggests:

I looked at their CSA Score, they have a 47% OOS rate for inspections.

That CSA snapshot can be looked up here: SAFER Web

But Joe's potential job driving a 350 with a wedge trailer sounds more like the renegade Outlaw that Rick describes, without any real Authority registration.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Taxman's Comment
member avatar

I don't know if it's a typo or if he really meant it, but the OP said E350 (Econoline), not F350 (pickup). Best case scenario, E350 would mean a cab/chassis with a custom towing body on it. Worst case, somebody bought a worn out ambulance and replaced the ambulance body with a gooseneck hitch.

Either way, all that was said here about DOT numbers, weigh stations etc holds true.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't know if it's a typo or if he really meant it, but the OP said E350 (Econoline), not F350 (pickup). Best case scenario, E350 would mean a cab/chassis with a custom towing body on it. Worst case, somebody bought a worn out ambulance and replaced the ambulance body with a gooseneck hitch.

Either way, all that was said here about DOT numbers, weigh stations etc holds true.

Something like this?

$_1.JPG?set_id=880000500F

He kinda indicated it had a "back seat" - not a coffin sleeper - so I'm still leaning towards a pickup.

Rick

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Michael V.'s Comment
member avatar

It does not need a sleeper to be legal. You have to log off duty but you can sleep in the truck. If it is diesel you can idle and run a.c. with the window down a little. I have been paid on a 1099 most of my life it is not illegal as long as it is not forced dispatch. Sounds like a hard job because of the lack of a sleeper. Also you will have to buy all your meals at restaurants and it gets expensive. You will be stuck waiting for a load at times and I would hate sitting around in a pick up truck for 24 to 48 hours so you are going to need a motel from time to time.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

It does not need a sleeper to be legal. You have to log off duty but you can sleep in the truck. If it is diesel you can idle and run a.c. with the window down a little. I have been paid on a 1099 most of my life it is not illegal as long as it is not forced dispatch. Sounds like a hard job because of the lack of a sleeper. Also you will have to buy all your meals at restaurants and it gets expensive. You will be stuck waiting for a load at times and I would hate sitting around in a pick up truck for 24 to 48 hours so you are going to need a motel from time to time.

49 CFR 393.76

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