One Fear I Have Of Becoming A Driver Is Mountains And Steep Grades Does Anyone Els?

Topic 1929 | Page 1

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Ronald D.'s Comment
member avatar

First of all thank you all for answering a lot of stupid things for a prosepctive adult wanting to enter this field, I appreciate the patience you all have. I also realize this is the best of any sites that does not have a lot of degrading others and other companies but honest replies.

I said in header my fear is mountain driving, sounds stupid but I have always had a fear of heights. I have driven a 40 foot diesel motorhome with a car behind it all over but never liked mountains at all especially coming down steep grades. And seeing all the time the truck run offs withe the barels to run into really freaked me out.

What do you all think is anyone else like me that will admit it scared of heights? And is there any posibility of regional jobs where you are not having to drive in tons of mountains?

Just thought I would ask and throw this out to all you drivers.

thank you again for answering me on all my so many questions I have no idea about even thou most may seem simple or stupit for me not knowing is helping get answers.

thank you Ron

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Logan T.'s Comment
member avatar

I had and still have the same fears it's not something you lose just because you've driven thru them. The conditions are going to be different nearly every time. But you take it slow, hell as slow as you want and your comfortable with. There is a saying I've heard and read. "You can go down mountains slow all the time, but you can only go down mountains once fast." When your driving mountains or steep hills, there are going to be warning signs that show steep grade and what percentage. Drop a gear or 2 or hell even 3 and let your jakes take you down. Just keep your foot close to the brake pedal. Mountains and steep grades are all about taking it slow, take it slow and you live to drive another day. I I drove thru the great smoky mountains about 2 weeks ago some grades I was able to make it down in 8th a couple of them I dropped to 7th and let my jakes take me down most of them tho and I dropped to 6th which for my mentors truck will slow you down all the way 30-35 which is fine with me because I plan to drive for many years to come.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Logan had an excellent reply.

Indeed everyone is at least respectful of the mountains if not outright terrified. Getting 80,000 pounds to the bottom safely is easy in good weather with Jake Brakes and the proper techniques. But throw in snow & ice and it changes everything. You really have to be on your game.

is there any possibility of regional jobs where you are not having to drive in tons of mountains?

Absolutely. There are a ton of companies that run what is referred to as Midwest Regional - they basically stay in the Midwest - NE, KS, IL, IN, OH, MI, OK, TX, etc. You won't see the mountains at all in those type of jobs.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I gotta say, everyone's afraid of mountains. I tremble at the sight of an 8% grade. But you really can't avoid downgrades altogether. You're going to have to accept that you will be going down slopes and you're going to have to learn how to do it. I don't think avoiding the entire 48 states because you don't like mountains is a good approach. There's millions of us that hate mountains but we learned how and we do them now. I never heard of a truck driver who became a driver but refused to go on any mountains.

I know you hate it, but I seriously think that downright avoiding them is a bad idea. You will have to learn how to do downgrades whether you like them or not. It's just part of the job that you simply cannot avoid.

Ronald D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Daniel I am not saying I wont drive them at all just asked if regions dont have them. I would just be the one they may laugh at going slow down them since I dont like heights and like to be alive at the bottom of the hill not the side of a cliff.

thanks Ron

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