Will An Employed Driver Be Required To Have A Smartphone On The Road?

Topic 19733 | Page 1

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Oscar Graham III's Comment
member avatar

Right now I have an Obamaphone. It is a smart phone Android that is free to me. It has limited mobile features however.

I would not want to spend my earnings on a mobile telephone subscription and equipment that is expensive.

I would want something like Trucker Path to aid navigation over the road.

Can Trucker Path be built into on/in-dash GPS systems? Is it a smartphone app only?

I have a laptop, but those don't seem very handy behind the wheel.

I would think modern trucks would have an advanced GPS system built into the dash with something like Trucker Path built right in to the system.

Do truckers have to actually mount their smartphones on the rig's dash?

If Trucker Path is a phone-only app, what type of phone instrument and phone carrier would I have to subscribe to to have Trucker Path access on the road?

Will this phone also be able to have Internet access without a wi-fi connection?

Part of learning the trucking trade is to know what electronics and technology I will prudently need, how to use it fast and efficiently, who will provide them and who has to pay for them.

Are phones used by truckers on the job company-supplied?

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

I would suggest going with Cricket. They have a completely unlimited talk, text, data (no throttling) for $70 a month. They have several inexpensive android phones to choose from.

Cricket uses AT&T for signal.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Oscar Graham III's Comment
member avatar

I would suggest going with Cricket. They have a completely unlimited talk, text, data (no throttling) for $70 a month. They have several inexpensive android phones to choose from.

Cricket uses AT&T for signal.

Thanks, Patrick.

I take it that the company I work for will not likely supply me with a company-issued phone. If I work as a trucker I will be too rich to continue to qualify for the Obamaphone anyway.

I don't talk much on the phone and hate high phone bills. The digital/nav technology will be more important than the voice in the cab.

I don't know if the truck's GPS system will provide any of the information that Trucker Path provides.

My Garmin Nuvi GPS in my car provides basic information as how to find the nearest Walmarts and other local businesses but not comprehensive information on big-rig parking and other on-the-road services that are critical to commercial trucking.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Most companies aren't going to pay for your cell phone. You have a QualComm for communicating with work.

I use my phone for a lot of things. Mostly for the GPS, Transflo mobile plus app, Truckers Path app and entertainment.

Since I use my phone for work related business, I can deduct a portion of the bill on my taxes. I usually claim half.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Oscar Graham III's Comment
member avatar

Most companies aren't going to pay for your cell phone. You have a QualComm for communicating with work.

I use my phone for a lot of things. Mostly for the GPS, Transflo mobile plus app, Truckers Path app and entertainment.

Since I use my phone for work related business, I can deduct a portion of the bill on my taxes. I usually claim half.

Patrick, do you mount your phone on the dash when you drive?

Does your company truck have its own GPS system?

If so, do you just navigate by your own personal phone anyway?

I can see how a driver can get inundated with technology.

I'm glad you can write off part of your phone costs.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Most companies aren't going to pay for your cell phone. You have a QualComm for communicating with work.

I use my phone for a lot of things. Mostly for the GPS, Transflo mobile plus app, Truckers Path app and entertainment.

Since I use my phone for work related business, I can deduct a portion of the bill on my taxes. I usually claim half.

double-quotes-end.png

Patrick, do you mount your phone on the dash when you drive?

Does your company truck have its own GPS system?

If so, do you just navigate by your own personal phone anyway?

I can see how a driver can get inundated with technology.

I'm glad you can write off part of your phone costs.

I

I have my phone mounted to the dash in my truck.

Yes we have gps on our Qualcomms.

I use my phone gps to compare the delivery address to where the qualcomm has ne going to make shre it is correct or at least close, plus i use it to look for the best entry points for that particular shipper and what to expect when I get there, dock location, etc.

I usually have my phone gps going as well as the qualcomm so i can also see if there is any traffic or accidents up ahead to give me a bit of a warbing, but i dont rely on that route alone, it us for cars.

And with my company we get discounts depending on what mobile provider we go with or already have.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

It is not mounted, per se, but I have it sitting above the vent controls.

The QualComm has a GPS, but I have never used it. I take my routing instructions, compare that to the route my phone is giving me, then grab my Atlas and make sure the routing my phone gives is truck accessible. I also use the satellite view on google maps to check out the area where my shipper/receiver is at and look for the best way in and out.

Since I know my phones GPS is for cars, I know not to blindly follow it. It is mainly to give me a heads up. Upcoming exits, traffic, distance to my destination, etc...

Your Atlas is your best friend. No matter what pay attention to signs. Things do change.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Right now I have an Obamaphone. It is a smart phone Android that is free to me. It has limited mobile features however.

I would not want to spend my earnings on a mobile telephone subscription and equipment that is expensive.

I would want something like Trucker Path to aid navigation over the road.

Can Trucker Path be built into on/in-dash GPS systems? Is it a smartphone app only?

I have a laptop, but those don't seem very handy behind the wheel.

I would think modern trucks would have an advanced GPS system built into the dash with something like Trucker Path built right in to the system.

Do truckers have to actually mount their smartphones on the rig's dash?

If Trucker Path is a phone-only app, what type of phone instrument and phone carrier would I have to subscribe to to have Trucker Path access on the road?

Will this phone also be able to have Internet access without a wi-fi connection?

Part of learning the trucking trade is to know what electronics and technology I will prudently need, how to use it fast and efficiently, who will provide them and who has to pay for them.

Are phones used by truckers on the job company-supplied?

You can get yourself a truckers GPS. But always, always refer to your truckers atlas first and be sure to read any road signs. You should be able to request directions from your dispatcher as well. Although you don't need a smartphone, I highly recommend it. Make sure you have good coverage. Cricket sounds good as well as straighttalk and for a contract phone Verixon being the best

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I cannot speak for the majority of the forum, but without a smart phone performing my job would be more difficult. I use it all the time...business and social

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