Newbie Trying Wanting To Know What To Expect

Topic 19932 | Page 1

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Toro's Comment
member avatar

Hello I am new to trucking, I have a cdl , I have been driving farm trucks, mainly straight truck, I been thinking about going over the road , I am currently talking to Western Express out of Nashville Tennessee, the recruiter I've been talking to, said I would half to take a two day refresher program, which I am fine with, other than I was a little shocked that the refresher is only a two day program, I figured at least a week to knock off any rust, I got leary when he kept saying Western Express has a sliding pay scale, and quoted I'd be averaging anywhere between 1100-1500 dollars a week, if that's legit I am not complaining, but I think it sounds a little high for rookie pay, I've been told to use caution to what a recruiter says, my questions are how far off base is this recruiter sales pitch to me? And is Western Express a decent place to work for? Is the pay not only decent for a rookie, but the paycheck is always when they say, with little errors on it? That way I don't half to worry about things being not shutoff on the family while I am gone.

I know no company is perfect in any profession and it's what one gives it, by keeping your head down, keep doing your job to the t day in and day out, moving forward till the next door opens.

I'm just trying minimize the risk by hopefully clearing up a few smoking mirrors.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OldRookie's Comment
member avatar

Hello I am new to trucking, I have a cdl , I have been driving farm trucks, mainly straight truck, I been thinking about going over the road , I am currently talking to Western Express out of Nashville Tennessee, the recruiter I've been talking to, said I would half to take a two day refresher program, which I am fine with, other than I was a little shocked that the refresher is only a two day program, I figured at least a week to knock off any rust, I got leary when he kept saying Western Express has a sliding pay scale, and quoted I'd be averaging anywhere between 1100-1500 dollars a week, if that's legit I am not complaining, but I think it sounds a little high for rookie pay, I've been told to use caution to what a recruiter says, my questions are how far off base is this recruiter sales pitch to me? And is Western Express a decent place to work for? Is the pay not only decent for a rookie, but the paycheck is always when they say, with little errors on it? That way I don't half to worry about things being not shutoff on the family while I am gone.

I know no company is perfect in any profession and it's what one gives it, by keeping your head down, keep doing your job to the t day in and day out, moving forward till the next door opens.

I'm just trying minimize the risk by hopefully clearing up a few smoking mirrors.

I can't speak to working at Western, but I'm close to finishing my first year solo with Millis and I would say that averaging $1,100 a week, gross (i.e. before taxes and deductions), is a reasonable expectation for someone willing to work hard. $1,100 a week works out to 2,500 miles a week, at 44 CPM.

When considering all of this, keep in mind that your miles each week will vary. For example, last week I had a little over 3,200 miles. This week, I'll be a little less than 2,500... and I've had weeks as low as 2,000 miles. Overall, for the past 50 weeks, my average is around 2,500. That average includes all of my home time and 2 full weeks I have taken off.

One other thing, keep in mind, it costs you money to be out on the road... food, drink, laundry, etc. Some people spend $20 a day, some spend $5... so what you actually have left for your family obligations will depend on how frugally you can live on the road.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Make Trucking Great Again's Comment
member avatar

Hello and welcome to TruckingTruth, Toro! For Starters: What level of CDL do you have? Class A or B? Also if you need to know what to TRULY expect from Western Express, ask some of their drivers on here. Anyone from Western Express will probably chime in on here once they see this post. In the meantime, I don't know how far you are in experience so let me give you the "welcome kit" as we call it:

Truck Driver's Career Guide

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

High Road Training Program

If you are needing help from a school for any refreshers or license upgrades this should help:

Truck Driving School Listings

or if you want to go the company sponsored route:

Paid CDL Training Programs

I sure hope any of the above information will help you out. MAKE SURE especially that you read Brett's book. It is by far the best account in my opinion of what you can truly expect in this industry. Also, if you need to take any tests to upgrade your license, that High Road Training is a GODSEND. I was able to pass my permit tests the first time. Its NOT JUST FOR PERMIT though. It also has ESSENTIAL ON THE JOB training also. Run that course. You will be surprised how much more knowledge you will gain. Stay safe and again, Welcome to TruckingTruth.

smile.gifgood-luck.gif

Brett, if you are looking at this post, how on Earth do yall make this look so pretty? How do you get the checkmarks by the links? I think I need more tips here. LOL. rofl-1.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Brett, if you are looking at this post, how on Earth do yall make this look so pretty? How do you get the checkmarks by the links?

When you're responding, look above the box you're typing into and click on "Links On TruckingTruth" - the first option is "Getting Started In Trucking" - click that and it will automatically insert the links for you with the checks.

Make Trucking Great Again's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Brett, if you are looking at this post, how on Earth do yall make this look so pretty? How do you get the checkmarks by the links?

double-quotes-end.png

When you're responding, look above the box you're typing into and click on "Links On TruckingTruth" - the first option is "Getting Started In Trucking" - click that and it will automatically insert the links for you with the checks.

Wow, thats cool. Thanks. Thats a much quicker shortcut to yalls welcome kit. Thanks so much, I appreciate it. I want to help out as many people as I can and this will make it SO much easier. Looks good to me. What do yall think?

smile.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Toro's Comment
member avatar

I currently have a class A cdl with all the works except hazmat , when I got out of my cdl school, I didn't go directly over the road or to a technical trucking company, I worked for a farmer that that mainly operated using straight trucks, he did have a couple Mack CH613 day cabs, where I'd pulled a hopper trailer during harvest time,

My experience with tractor trailer is limited, but I'm familiar with them.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Make Trucking Great Again's Comment
member avatar

I currently have a class A cdl with all the works except hazmat , when I got out of my cdl school, I didn't go directly over the road or to a technical trucking company, I worked for a farmer that that mainly operated using straight trucks, he did have a couple Mack CH613 day cabs, where I'd pulled a hopper trailer during harvest time,

My experience with tractor trailer is limited, but I'm familiar with them.

How recent is your experience? I am not a company recruiter by any stretch but if its been a while you may need a refresher. You may even have to go back to school, however as soon as you have 160+hrs of instruction then you will more than likely get your certificate and maybe get hired by a company.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Toro's Comment
member avatar

It has been a couple seasons ago, since I dove tractor trailer, I did drive it for 4 harvest seasons.

Make Trucking Great Again's Comment
member avatar

It has been a couple seasons ago, since I dove tractor trailer, I did drive it for 4 harvest seasons.

More than likely a company PROBABLY will put you through a refresher then. More than likely I would apply for an EXPERIENCED driver position and if a company tells you that you need schooling again, then go throughtheir program if they offer it.

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

Paid CDL Training Programs

I would check that 2nd link first but apply through one of those as an EXPERIENCED driver and then see what they say since you have your CDL and EXPERIENCE WITHIN THE LAST 5 YEARS.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
40 Ton Land Captain's Comment
member avatar

Hello I am new to trucking, I have a cdl , I have been driving farm trucks, mainly straight truck, I been thinking about going over the road , I am currently talking to Western Express out of Nashville Tennessee, the recruiter I've been talking to, said I would half to take a two day refresher program, which I am fine with, other than I was a little shocked that the refresher is only a two day program, I figured at least a week to knock off any rust, I got leary when he kept saying Western Express has a sliding pay scale, and quoted I'd be averaging anywhere between 1100-1500 dollars a week, if that's legit I am not complaining, but I think it sounds a little high for rookie pay, I've been told to use caution to what a recruiter says, my questions are how far off base is this recruiter sales pitch to me? And is Western Express a decent place to work for? Is the pay not only decent for a rookie, but the paycheck is always when they say, with little errors on it? That way I don't half to worry about things being not shutoff on the family while I am gone.

I know no company is perfect in any profession and it's what one gives it, by keeping your head down, keep doing your job to the t day in and day out, moving forward till the next door opens.

I'm just trying minimize the risk by hopefully clearing up a few smoking mirrors.

Tell Western you want a week long refresher course, they will accommodate you, no problems!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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