Is This Normal To Make This Little Money?

Topic 19953 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Z, that is not normal at all bro, you should be making at least $700 a week and that's on a bad low mileage week.

And he will be. Remember, he's only on his second week solo. The truck isn't even up to operating temperature yet and his dispatcher doesn't even know his name. He'll get there.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Absolutely awesome advice from everyone. You guys are gold.

Z, that advice came from drivers who know how this industry works and I can't even really add to what they've said. I just want to say that you will absolutely be able to make the kind of money you're hoping to make and it shouldn't be long if you'll follow the great advice you've been given. Just keep it positive, be super reliable with your appointment times, be safe, and keep pushing your dispatcher for more miles.

At most jobs the boss will just throw a pile of work in front of you every day and say "do it". And you do it. But trucking usually isn't like that, especially when you're new. Often times a dispatcher is going to break you in slowly and feel things out a little bit. They want to make sure they can count on you. They want to see what type of driver you are, and what type of person you are. Because they can usually tell pretty quickly if you're the type that's going to jump ship as soon as there's a problem, or if you're lazy and needy, or like in your case if you're ambitious and eager to take on a strong workload.

So definitely keep it positive, make all of your appointment times, and keep lobbying dispatch for more miles.

Now this might be a little old school for ya, but for some reason I always think of the song "Centerfield" by John Fogerty when I think about lobbying dispatch for more miles:

double-quotes-start.png

Oh, put me in coach, I'm ready to play today
Put me in coach, I'm ready to play today
Look at me, gotta be, centerfield

double-quotes-end.png

You just have to keep after it in the right way, ya know what I mean? Make it clear to them that you're eager for more work, you're ready to prove yourself, and you want them to challenge you a little bit. Be that guy that just won't stop lobbying until you get the miles you need. And of course, most importantly, you have to produce when you get your chance. Always, always safety first, of course, but you have to make your appointment times and get the job done if you want to be in the game with the big dogs.

Hang in there. And please, keep us updated. We're glad you came to us with this. We'll make sure you're able to figure out how to get the miles you need.

So Brett likes some CCR (Creedence Clearwater Revival)? Well thats one thing we have in common. I LOVE CCR playing when I am driving down the road. For those of you who don't know, John Fogerty is the lead singer of Creedence Clearwater Revival. My fav one of their tunes is Lookin Out My Back Door.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Z's Comment
member avatar

Millionmiler24: my driver leader is in Lewiston idaho, though I've mostly been driving around my home state of Texas.

Thanks for all your advice, everyone Ill take it to heart. My next question is, when do the sobbing and the nightmares stop?

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

My next question is, when do the sobbing and the nightmares stop?

That all depends on what is causing it. If it's just a little debt and some homesickness, then I say, in my best Walter Sobchak voice, "You have got to buck up, man. You cannot drag this negative energy in to the tournament!"

walter-sobchak-donny-the-dude.jpg

You've got a job, you're on the right track, and you've got people you can count on to tell you the truth. It's going to be better soon.

If it's something more serious, like PTSD, then I have no idea.

Z's Comment
member avatar

Haha thanks man. Its more than a little debt, about 120k. Its also more than just homesickness. To be honest, I thought trucking would be a way to get my life back on track, but I'm worried I'm just making things worse. If I wanted to get fancy Id call it 'existential anxiety.'

Ill do my best to just suck it up and soldier through. To be honest I feel pretty great when I'm driving. Its when I shut down and lie down in the sleeper and the walls start closing in and I kinda freak out.

double-quotes-start.png

My next question is, when do the sobbing and the nightmares stop?

double-quotes-end.png

That all depends on what is causing it. If it's just a little debt and some homesickness, then I say, in my best Walter Sobchak voice, "You have got to buck up, man. You cannot drag this negative energy in to the tournament!"

walter-sobchak-donny-the-dude.jpg

You've got a job, you're on the right track, and you've got people you can count on to tell you the truth. It's going to be better soon.

If it's something more serious, like PTSD, then I have no idea.

murderspolywog's Comment
member avatar

My advise for dealing with anxiety is put a bike on the truck, or go for a run before bed. After almost being hit a few times you will realize that your problems are not to bad and you will be tired so it will help you sleep better. Talk to a homeless person, being distracted by someone else problems take your mind off your and gives you perspective. My personal favert is play classical music before bed. Or you can always come talk to us, we will tell it how it is. And maybe give you more nightmares.

"Joey have you ever seen a grown man naked?" Aka a truck driver, will give you nightmares for months.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Without a doubt, some good hard exercise is an awesome relief for stress or depression. It won't fix your problems, but it will make you feel a thousand times better. I'm the happiest dude you'll ever meet in your life, but if I go even two or three days without some sort of vigorous exercise I start feeling lethargic and disinterested and bored. I guess "slightly crabby" and restless would be a good way to describe it. Even 30 minutes of lifting some weights or 45 minutes of some hard hiking in the hills and I feel like my old self again. Never fails.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Millionmiler24: my driver leader is in Lewiston idaho, though I've mostly been driving around my home state of Texas.

Thanks for all your advice, everyone Ill take it to heart. My next question is, when do the sobbing and the nightmares stop?

Ok. I was out of the Lancaster TX terminal when I drove for Swift. I never had the chance to visit the Lewiston Terminal, however, I have heard its a very nice place to be.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Z's Comment
member avatar

That's good. I did orientation and parked my car at Lancaster.

double-quotes-start.png

Millionmiler24: my driver leader is in Lewiston idaho, though I've mostly been driving around my home state of Texas.

Thanks for all your advice, everyone Ill take it to heart. My next question is, when do the sobbing and the nightmares stop?

double-quotes-end.png

Ok. I was out of the Lancaster TX terminal when I drove for Swift. I never had the chance to visit the Lewiston Terminal, however, I have heard its a very nice place to be.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Z's Comment
member avatar

Hey I just wanted to say thanks. Your PTSD comment got me doing some research. I'm fairly certain I do have a form of PTSD due to some recurring traumatic experiences in childhood. It actually explains a lot of the problems I've had in life. The symptoms just hadn't come to an obvious head until I got out here alone. You don't know how much your offhand comment may have helped me.

double-quotes-start.png

My next question is, when do the sobbing and the nightmares stop?

double-quotes-end.png

That all depends on what is causing it. If it's just a little debt and some homesickness, then I say, in my best Walter Sobchak voice, "You have got to buck up, man. You cannot drag this negative energy in to the tournament!"

walter-sobchak-donny-the-dude.jpg

You've got a job, you're on the right track, and you've got people you can count on to tell you the truth. It's going to be better soon.

If it's something more serious, like PTSD, then I have no idea.

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