Two Right Turn Lanes....

Topic 20598 | Page 11

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G-Town's Comment
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Don replies...

G-town, I read the entire thread.

If you read the entire thread Don, there is a high percentage of agreement on this subject.

Don, other than some insulting reference to “Cheerios”, I think this is an incredibly valuable thread for teaching how to handle this type of turning configuration from both a CDL testing perspective and then a real-world application.

Like I said there is a high percentage of agreement on how this should be handled; of particular note is Errol’s advice. Not too long ago Errol was a CDL driving instructor. His commentary on technical topics such as this one carry a great deal of weight. Dave actually came around after a brief exchange. That plus Susan’s detailed explanation differentiating between testing vs real world (where some initial confusion lies) there is overall agreement within this thread.

At least you agree on proper execution of a turn like this, which confirms the overall point most of us were emphatically making here.

If you want to pinpoint the root of the contradiction; look at the differing opinions of LEOs, not one of which has spent a single minute in a class 7-8 truck. The laws in some states? They’re antiquated and we’re likely written 40-50 years ago, long before trucks were over 70’ long.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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The laws in some states? They’re antiquated and we’re likely written 40-50 years ago, long before trucks were over 70’ long.

......and also not written by anyone with experience in a long combination vehicle.......

One of the keys to safe, defensive driving is always knowing what all of the vehicles are doing on all sides of you. When you think this topic through you'll realize there's only one position you can be in while making a turn with two turning lanes that will put you in a position where you can monitor all of the vehicles on all sides of you, and that is in the outermost turning lane. If you take the turn in the innermost lane you will have vehicles turning alongside you that are in your blind spot. You can't monitor them if you can't see them. This applies to left and right hand turns.

So if anyone has any confusion with this topic then picture an overhead view of the turn, picture where the blind spots are while you're making the turn, and you'll come to understand why the outermost lane is safest.

As an added measure of safety, the outermost lane allows you to take a much wider turn without encroaching on any other vehicles. This will give your tandems more room for offtracking.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Today, I asked another of my instructors this question. He is the oldest, and probably the most experienced.

He said always take the outer turn lane, no matter what direction, for exactly the reasons given here.

Robsteeler's Comment
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So funny, because I ran into this again on Friday when I went to a receiver in Enfield, CT. I got off I-91 and what did I see? A double right turn lane.😂 Needless to say, I jumped right in the outside lane...then a Smith truck pulls right into the inside turn lane. 😂 Light turned and I went with no problem, while he had to pause an wait so he could swing out and not hit the telephone pole on the corner. Older guy too...

Susan D. 's Comment
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In Kentucky, all DOT officers and a majority of countyies sheriff's deputys have their CDL A. They're a great resource and wealth of knowledge. DOT told us in school, if you ever have ANY question, no matter how dumb you think it is, stop by any Kentucky scale house and ask them. Teaching is part of their job. They also welcome any driver to park at any scale for a 30 minute or 10 hour break. It's one of the the few places they're not gung ho jerks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Guess what was on my road test? And guess which lane I am supposed to use? Right lane. BUT the lane was designed properly so there was no offtrack or encroachment.

Seabee-J's Comment
member avatar

When driving a bus I've always been told to use the Outermost lane when turning for reasons stated above like being able to observe traffic and also for off tracking . I've asked instructors and DMV examiners and they agree . In reality any large Class 7/8 vehicle needs the room especially in urban areas . I've seen drivers take out signs/poles etc by getting in the inside lane . Almost did it myself as I jumped the curb onto a tight neighborhood street and just missed a mailbox . If I was in a rig ..... Forget it .

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Lol grumpy. Those pesky turns :-). There is a double right at I-80 exit 112 in Morris, IL that both lanes are set up well to accommodate trucks in either lane. There's 2 truck stops and a large Costco DC off this exit.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Shawn B.'s Comment
member avatar

The way I was taught is if you’re taking a right turn , use the inside lane towards the curb but ride white line and borrow over as needed , left turn is outside lane ..

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

The way I was taught is if you’re taking a right turn , use the inside lane towards the curb but ride white line and borrow over as needed , left turn is outside lane ..

Well then you were taught wrong. You can't "borrow over as needed" to your left while you're making a right hand turn because the left side of your trailer is a blindspot. How can you move over into that lane when there is almost certainly traffic there that you can't see?

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