CFI CDL Training

Topic 21379 | Page 16

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Jmart's Comment
member avatar

Local, hazmat , tanker...

You have no experience. I think you are making a very big mistake.

I'm not sure what other options I have with my situation. What do you suggest?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

You had to know going in that it's recommended to get one year of experience OTR. Not sure why that's no longer an option.

Local work under the best of circumstance is very difficult with long hours and tight quarter maneuvering. Add-in the fact you have no experience plus hazmat tanker, it significantly raises your risk and failure factor.

Read Rob's diary...it's about local work.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

You had to know going in that it's recommended to get one year of experience OTR. Not sure why that's no longer an option.

Local work under the best of circumstance is very difficult with long hours and tight quarter maneuvering. Add-in the fact you have no experience plus hazmat tanker, it significantly raises your risk and failure factor.

Read Rob's diary...it's about local work.

You are not telling him anything he doesn't already know. He knew that and found out that the reality of OTR driving would not work for him and his family. This was not an easy decision for him and was not made lightly. He did not have any bad experiences with CFI. The local company is not LTL work and the company knows that he doesn't have that experience. If they are willing to work with him and give him a shot it's up to them?

Being over the road requires being out at least six weeks at a time to make the miles. This is very taxing on families. My wife and I miss each other. She feels like she's missing precious time with me. I miss my wife, my house and my dogs. In a few months, I will be looking for a local job. If I was single, I would have a dog on my truck and be out here for the rest of my life.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Jmart, we hope if you get that position you're successful. However the odds are stacked against you. We don't mean to discourage you however local driving is often above the skill set of rookies. I started fresh out of school but I went through a mandatory 12 week training period where I had an experienced driver seated next to me. Only time he drove was some of the places I had to back into were above my skill set and I asked him to get it in after I tried a couple times as we were obstructing traffic. You worked your tail off to earn that CDL , the last thing we want is you to ruin your career before you fully get started. I would be sure that this company has a thorough training program. Many local positions I've seen advertised in my area are only giving a week or 2 of training. If you are going to be starting local search indeed. In my area there's 6 different companies looking for "delivery driver trainee" that have a 12 week training schedule. There was a member here "mountain girl" that got her start doing P&D for Old dominion fresh out of school. She was involved in multiple accidents her first couple months and was ultimately let go. She had a hard time finding a new carrier that would even touch her. Again, wish you the best of luck and look forward to hearing about this however we don't want to see you jeopardize your career.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Jmart's Comment
member avatar

Jmart, we hope if you get that position you're successful. However the odds are stacked against you. We don't mean to discourage you however local driving is often above the skill set of rookies. I started fresh out of school but I went through a mandatory 12 week training period where I had an experienced driver seated next to me. Only time he drove was some of the places I had to back into were above my skill set and I asked him to get it in after I tried a couple times as we were obstructing traffic. You worked your tail off to earn that CDL , the last thing we want is you to ruin your career before you fully get started. I would be sure that this company has a thorough training program. Many local positions I've seen advertised in my area are only giving a week or 2 of training. If you are going to be starting local search indeed. In my area there's 6 different companies looking for "delivery driver trainee" that have a 12 week training schedule. There was a member here "mountain girl" that got her start doing P&D for Old dominion fresh out of school. She was involved in multiple accidents her first couple months and was ultimately let go. She had a hard time finding a new carrier that would even touch her. Again, wish you the best of luck and look forward to hearing about this however we don't want to see you jeopardize your career.

Thanks Rob! I meet with the manager tomorrow. I have a list of questions for him. I want to make sure I know what I'm getting into. Also, it isn't necessarily local, they deliver hundreds of miles away as well as some local. I will keep you all updated.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

You had to know going in that it's recommended to get one year of experience OTR. Not sure why that's no longer an option.

Local work under the best of circumstance is very difficult with long hours and tight quarter maneuvering. Add-in the fact you have no experience plus hazmat tanker, it significantly raises your risk and failure factor.

Read Rob's diary...it's about local work.

double-quotes-end.png

You are not telling him anything he doesn't already know. He knew that and found out that the reality of OTR driving would not work for him and his family. This was not an easy decision for him and was not made lightly. He did not have any bad experiences with CFI. The local company is not LTL work and the company knows that he doesn't have that experience. If they are willing to work with him and give him a shot it's up to them?

Being over the road requires being out at least six weeks at a time to make the miles. This is very taxing on families. My wife and I miss each other. She feels like she's missing precious time with me. I miss my wife, my house and my dogs. In a few months, I will be looking for a local job. If I was single, I would have a dog on my truck and be out here for the rest of my life.

Interesting...he can't answer for himself?

Local hazmat tanker, entry level driver...what am I missing?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jmart's Comment
member avatar

Interesting...he can't answer for himself?

Local hazmat tanker, entry level driver...what am I missing?

Yes, I can answer for myself. Yes, I knew it was a commitment when I got in. However, it didn't work out for me and my situation. I have a meeting tomorrow with the manager of the business and have several questions to ask before I make my decision. I also am well aware the odds are against me. However, I know it can be done. I appreciate the feedback but everyone's situation is different and you have to make the best decision for your situation. This shouldn't be an argument anyway. It should be more of how to help someone out to be successful in this situation under the circumstances.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Interesting...he can't answer for himself?

Local hazmat tanker, entry level driver...what am I missing?

Yes, I can answer for myself. Yes, I knew it was a commitment when I got in. However, it didn't work out for me and my situation. I have a meeting tomorrow with the manager of the business and have several questions to ask before I make my decision. I also am well aware the odds are against me. However, I know it can be done. I appreciate the feedback but everyone's situation is different and you have to make the best decision for your situation. This shouldn't be an argument anyway. It should be more of how to help someone out to be successful in this situation under the circumstances.

How am I to help you? I can't encourage you to do something that I strongly believe you are not ready for, endangers you and everyone around you.

Local work as a rookie is one thing; however tanker and hazmat...very risky.

I am trying to help you...look for something else that is less dangerous. You are a rookie with very basic skills. Fact. Only experience and learning from mistakes will change that.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Jmart's Comment
member avatar

I understand your concerns. I will explore other options that work with my circumstances. It doesn't necessarily mean I won't do this. It isn't a decision I am taking lightly.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I understand your concerns. I will explore other options that work with my circumstances. It doesn't necessarily mean I won't do this. It isn't a decision I am taking lightly.

No, I really don't think you understand my concerns...

It doesn't matter how serious you are taking it...doesn't change anything.

You probably think; "what a jerk." And that's fine. Every experienced driver in this forum worth their weight in salt, will feel the same way.

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