Information From The Pool Of Wisdom

Topic 21494 | Page 2

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PJ's Comment
member avatar

That's a new one on me. It used to be lifting the tarps onto a platform that was approximately shoulder height. You must be going flatbed. Van and reefer didn't go through that part. I got a buddy on curtainside their so I'll ask him.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Papa Bear's Comment
member avatar

That's a new one on me. It used to be lifting the tarps onto a platform that was approximately shoulder height. You must be going flatbed. Van and reefer didn't go through that part. I got a buddy on curtainside their so I'll ask him.

I’m going Van, according to the recruiter. Thank you for asking your buddy. I got two videos to watch, one was like you said and the other one crt machine. If I look at videos and Forums, it’s mostly saying crt. And I forgot to ask the recruiter about this, because it came up after or initial interview. I probably pass the crt machine too, depending on what they looking for. Just not really trusting and understanding that machine, or being worried about it.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

No idea what the reference to CRT means... I'd follow up with your recruiter.

Papa Bear's Comment
member avatar

No idea what the reference to CRT means... I'd follow up with your recruiter.

G- Town maybe I wrote it wrong. It’s a machine that tests your physical fitness. I don’t know how you post links in her.

https://youtu.be/UJZsU1sJ7lc

Papa Bear's Comment
member avatar

Because of the awesome people in here, I’m now really trying to do this. It won't be easy but I think it’s worth it. Can the Swift people please give me some more information. I’m considering now Swift as a option. The thing with Swift as the big player is that it’s hard to find consistent information, if you look on here as example it gives a list of schools. Now I found a few people that said Swift cdl training North Carolina. Here this is not listed. What’s not a problem just giving a example. The other thing with Swift is some say they mostly use automatic, others swear that’s a lie. Does Swift allow idling the truck, or do you have one of the systems in the truck so you don’t need to idle if you need heat or ac?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Because of the awesome people in here, I’m now really trying to do this. It won't be easy but I think it’s worth it. Can the Swift people please give me some more information. I’m considering now Swift as a option. The thing with Swift as the big player is that it’s hard to find consistent information, if you look on here as example it gives a list of schools. Now I found a few people that said Swift cdl training North Carolina. Here this is not listed. What’s not a problem just giving a example. The other thing with Swift is some say they mostly use automatic, others swear that’s a lie. Does Swift allow idling the truck, or do you have one of the systems in the truck so you don’t need to idle if you need heat or ac?

Swift has their own academies, and they also partner with various private schools to train prospective drivers. I was trained at the C1 Driving School, in Indianapolis, IN. I think, that the North Carolina school is a contracted private school. Either way, keep in mind that the schools only teach enough to pass the state test, and get your CDL. The real learning starts once you arrive at orientation, and then get on the truck with your mentor. It will be a crash course in a whole new career/lifestyle.

I have zero complaints with Swift, except maybe wanting to travel further distances, but that is the nature of the account that I am on. I am very regional. And that right there is the advantage of Swift. I can transfer to a different account, and see if that fits me better. Flatbed is still my first choice, and I have already been in contact with the people in that account. The opportunities are abundant, even if you want to transfer into a dispatch or other office position.

G Town, and Errol were my 2 biggest influences in choosing Swift. I am very happy with my decision.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Papa Bear...I apologize for not reading this sooner.

Couple of things; Swift indeed is transitioning to all auto-shift trucks, as well as most of the industry. It's the trend and I doubt you'll see that changing. The 2015s were the last year for full manual transmissions. Since older trucks are typically used at the Academies, you'll learn on either an eight or ten speed manual. Swift allows idling if it's really hot or really cold. The bunks have heaters that are quite effective and do not require idling.

In summary; my experience with Swift since I began in 2013, has been a very positive one. I attended and graduated their Richmond Academy, road trained for 240 hrs of driving, OTR first three months of solo, on Walmart Dedicated NE region ever since. No complaints.

Although I could pretty much go to any company at this point, I choose to work for Swift because of the account I am on (which I love), the flexibility, the investments I've made in professional relationships, and the very good compensation.

Although Swift is a huge company, the pond I swim in has 100 drivers, 2 planners, 5 driver managers, 1 safety manager, one office manager and a terminal manager. The notion you are just a number is not true. You'll get out of it what you put into it.

Good luck.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Papa Bear's Comment
member avatar

Papa Bear...I apologize for not reading this sooner.

Couple of things; Swift indeed is transitioning to all auto-shift trucks, as well as most of the industry. It's the trend and I doubt you'll see that changing. The 2015s were the last year for full manual transmissions. Since older trucks are typically used at the Academies, you'll learn on either an eight or ten speed manual. Swift allows idling if it's really hot or really cold. The bunks have heaters that are quite effective and do not require idling.

In summary; my experience with Swift since I began in 2013, has been a very positive one. I attended and graduated their Richmond Academy, road trained for 240 hrs of driving, OTR first three months of solo, on Walmart Dedicated NE region ever since. No complaints.

Although I could pretty much go to any company at this point, I choose to work for Swift because of the account I am on (which I love), the flexibility, the investments I've made in professional relationships, and the very good compensation.

Although Swift is a huge company, the pond I swim in has 100 drivers, 2 planners, 5 driver managers, 1 safety manager, one office manager and a terminal manager. The notion you are just a number is not true. You'll get out of it what you put into it.

Good luck.

No Problem at all, everyone get buddy this time of the year. Merry Christmas. I now have 2 applications in, one with Rhoel and the other with Swift. I will listen to both and see, what fits me best.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar
2015s were the last year for full manual transmissions. Since older trucks are typically used at the Academies, you'll learn on either an eight or ten speed manual. Swift allows idling if it's really hot or really cold. The bunks have heaters that are quite effective and do not require idling

My truck is a 2015 International auto shift. I love it. However, the bunk heater is 1000% broken, and they have no intention of fixing it, because of cost, and the eventual retiring from fleet. They Disabled the idle shutoff. It is definitely a mixed blessing.

Papa Bear's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

2015s were the last year for full manual transmissions. Since older trucks are typically used at the Academies, you'll learn on either an eight or ten speed manual. Swift allows idling if it's really hot or really cold. The bunks have heaters that are quite effective and do not require idling

double-quotes-end.png

My truck is a 2015 International auto shift. I love it. However, the bunk heater is 1000% broken, and they have no intention of fixing it, because of cost, and the eventual retiring from fleet. They Disabled the idle shutoff. It is definitely a mixed blessing.

Thank you again. That was the only real think I wasn’t sure how they handle hot or cold, when they don’t want you to idle. I understand the cost on fuel but he I am not a turkey that needs to be finished in a hot oven. 😂

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