First Time To Seattle

Topic 21590 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Iron Emu's Comment
member avatar

I got a load heading to Seattle, Washington as the title says and it was my first time up in Washington period. I just wanted to throw a word of warning out to any new drivers like myself, I've been through the mountains and in the snow in several places, if you've been through West Virginia in winter then you know it gets sobering really fast under full load. But nothing I've been through prepared me for this morning. 90W through the mountains, which is basically all of Washington from my experience, will not only sober you; It will put you in your place. This is the first time I've been legitimately scared, and I don't mean like spooked. The only time I can remember being more fightened was boarding a helicopter to go in country. I'm not trying to scare anyone, you will see alot of trucks on this route and I have no idea how some of them were doing the speeds they were but please take it slow your first time. I don't know the name of this particular section, but their is an area where your only warning if a steep grade is a small yellow sign, their is no mention of the actual grade. You come around a bend and it's just a straight shot down with a sharp left hook at the bottom where it runs to a cliff wall. A more experienced person than myself probably knows what I am talking about. If you are prepared for it isn't that bad I'm sure, probably still a little scary but not what I came to considering I'm a calm guy who keeps his head cool under most stress. Thank you for your time.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

You got chains? Also how are you getting up there? (As in which interstates). Parking is non-existent over there unless you get lucky or have a company terminal nearby. Take it easy, watch the weather, and enjoy Washington's beauty!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Nevermind was lazy and just scanned thru haha. 90 is pretty scary when it is dry. Good to hear you made it through!

Matt M.'s Comment
member avatar

If you want scary try to park at the Loves in Tacoma!

There's some pretty spots up there, I always liked running over to Wenatchee to load apples in the winter.

It can get kind of hairy in a blizzard though. They usually take pretty good care of 90, but when Snoqualmie gets 10 feet of snow in a week not a lot can be done.

Iron Emu's Comment
member avatar

Chains aren't necesarry right now in this area (still in Oregon right now on my way back with a gravy run) cause their isn't snow on the road. The ice was there and it was like a random land mine waiting to ruin your day. But their is absolutely no doubt to the beauty of the state, none. I got a couple good photos, but it is gorgeous. Just whoever planned that interstate was drunk I'm certain.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
Just whoever planned that interstate was drunk I'm certain.

I'm certain "they", the design engineers were NOT drunk.

They run the highways through mountain passes taking the path of least resistance looking for natural cuts and valleys. Just look at the geography in that area...the route you were on was the optimal path. Same approach and process for cutting roads through any mountain passes.

Problem is these roads were designed in the 40s and 50s when gross weights were lower and trailers were less than 40' long.

I guarantee, faced with the exact same road a year from now, it won't appear as daunting.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Iron Emu, I'm curious as to which company you're driving for?

Also, this time of year if you're running out West, you need chains on your truck. I think that's why Gladhand asked you that question. You can get a ticket in several of those Western states just for not having them on your truck during the winter months.

It's great having some new flat bedders in here. I can still remember the days when I was the only crazy fool in this forum!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Iron Emu's Comment
member avatar

G-town, while I know you are right about the time frame differences and optimal path given the geography, at the very least some gradient signs would be nice. I'm sure you are right that as I, hopefully, spend more time in the northwest I will become more comfortable and accustomed to the combination of weather and terrain. The only way to be more okay with it is to keep working it. Old School, I run with Western Express and I do indeed have chains in my possession. I had misunderstood the question. I love it though, a couple of other guys I knew who were Marine/Navy started doing it and it seemed a great way to keep in shape and drive a rig. Still have a workout routine aside from the work but it helps.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

IronEmu; in your first post you mentioned a small yellow sign indicating a grade. Your above reply leads me to believe there were none. Doesn't matter either way. Here's why...

Not sure if you have ever been on I-90 through western WA and the infamous Snoqualmie Pass. I assume from your initial post, probably not. My suggestion in the future, use a trucker's road Atlas whenever routed through unfamiliar territory. The Atlas provides information on road, highway or Interstate that is not obvious on a GPS. Using the RM Road Atlas in conjunction with a GPS should be a regular part of your trip-plan.

If you look at I-90 headed West towards Seattle in the Atlas two things are obvious;

- the circuitous nature of the path of the road, and the surrounding mountain elevations clearly marked indicating mountainous terrain. Expect grades that require care when descending. Don't rely on signage, especially in the winter. Signs get taken out by plows and out of control vehicles.

It's also advisable to Google a particular stretch of Interstate or Highway through mountaneous terrain. Lots of valuable information are contained especially if it's DOT website site.

Not trying to be mean or cold here, trying to help you better prepare for this sort of thing.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Iron Emu's Comment
member avatar

G-town even if you were being mean it would be understandable, a failure of planning can be (and was) dangerous. I believe that was the name of the pass I was on though, and going back now and looking at it on a map it should have been indicative of the nature of the road. This goes further to prove my point in my initial post about being careful in the area, well not just in that particular area as you have pointed out and I now have to amend, but in any area you really don't know.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More