Roehl's GYCDL And 120,000 Miles Contract

Topic 22077 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Don's Comment
member avatar

I finally got a definite answer/explanation of Roehl's (Get Your CDL) GYCDL contract. If for ANY reason(s) you do not complete the GYCDL program and complete 120,000 miles you will be on the hook for $7000.00. WOW! Now I realize that training a driver isn't cheap, but 7000.00 may be more than I can chew. Local private schools are not that expensive! Roehl does pay you $500.00 a week during school, so IF you can save all of that, then it could be applied to tuition. Swift is $3900 +750 housing+ food/miscellaneous, so lets say $5000. Millis is $2350. Hmmmm....

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Glenn, if you were to sign up for a private school but didn't finish the curriculum you would also be on the hook for the full tuition. There are private schools which are less expensive than this, but there are a few that are even more expensive.

I think I may have a solution to this problem though. Finish the program! Crazy idea, right?

The thing you'll want to understand is that these programs are trying to avoid those people who aren't serious about getting their trucking career underway. Trucking is one hell of a tough gig. It's a huge commitment. You can't imagine how many people show up to these programs and don't take it seriously. They put in little or no effort, they don't listen, they don't learn, and they completely underestimate trucking in every way.

Your eyes should get a little wider and you should reconsider your options when you realize you're going to be on the hook for that money if you don't stick with the program. That's what they want you to do. They want you to make sure that you're fully committed to making this happen before you sign up.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Glenn wrote:

Swift is $3900 +750 housing+ food/miscellaneous, so lets say $5000.

Do you plan on flunking out Glenn? Your numbers represent a situation of not graduating after 3.0 weeks of attendance. Is that a likely scenario? Unless you lied on your application, or caught drinking, NO, not likely, not for Swift.

If you somehow manage to make it through week one of Swift school, the success rate is much higher, above 50%. If you make it to week three, Swift's instructors will do everything in their collective power to help you succeed. To the extreme of extending into a fourth week at no additional charge if required. A private school will not work with you like that.

Please re-read your Swift tuition thread I just bumped.

Don's Comment
member avatar

Brett: Thanks for your reply. I am more concerned about the 120,000 miles than completing the CDL training program itself.

Glenn, if you were to sign up for a private school but didn't finish the curriculum you would also be on the hook for the full tuition. There are private schools which are less expensive than this, but there are a few that are even more expensive.

I think I may have a solution to this problem though. Finish the program! Crazy idea, right?

The thing you'll want to understand is that these programs are trying to avoid those people who aren't serious about getting their trucking career underway. Trucking is one hell of a tough gig. It's a huge commitment. You can't imagine how many people show up to these programs and don't take it seriously. They put in little or no effort, they don't listen, they don't learn, and they completely underestimate trucking in every way.

Your eyes should get a little wider and you should reconsider your options when you realize you're going to be on the hook for that money if you don't stick with the program. That's what they want you to do. They want you to make sure that you're fully committed to making this happen before you sign up.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Don's Comment
member avatar

G-Town: Thanks for your reply. No, I do not "plan" on flunking out, I certainly did not lie on my application and I do not drink, nor do drugs. The recruiter did not mention about a 4th week extension. I better contact him again.

Thanks again

Glenn wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

Swift is $3900 +750 housing+ food/miscellaneous, so lets say $5000.

double-quotes-end.png

Do you plan on flunking out Glenn? Your numbers represent a situation of not graduating after 3.0 weeks of attendance. Is that a likely scenario? Unless you lied on your application, or caught drinking, NO, not likely, not for Swift.

If you somehow manage to make it through week one of Swift school, the success rate is much higher, above 50%. If you make it to week three, Swift's instructors will do everything in their collective power to help you succeed. To the extreme of extending into a fourth week at no additional charge if required. A private school will not work with you like that.

Please re-read your Swift tuition thread I just bumped.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I am more concerned about the 120,000 miles than completing the CDL training program itself.

Why are you concerned about the 120,000 miles? You're concerned you won't want to complete that many or you're concerned you'll be fired before that?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Glenn...you missed the point. I never suggested you did any of those things, just that you seem to be hedging your bet at the risk of failure.

The recruiter will not confirm the fourth week..,it's a case by case basis decided at the Academy location.

Look, I know what I am talking about. You can either consider what I am saying or not. Up to you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I am more concerned about the 120,000 miles than completing the CDL training program itself.

double-quotes-end.png

Why are you concerned about the 120,000 miles? You're concerned you won't want to complete that many or you're concerned you'll be fired before that?

confused.gif

Glenn are we missing something here? 120k miles is roughly a year, maybe 13 months.

What is your goal with all of this minutiae? You seem to be more focused on a what-if failure scenario than planning your success.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Don's Comment
member avatar

G-town, you may be right about the "what if failure scenario" thinking. I truly am not trying to be irritating, but going into something unknown can cause anxiety. I have been a nurse for 32+ years, so driving is a totally different path

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I am more concerned about the 120,000 miles than completing the CDL training program itself.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Why are you concerned about the 120,000 miles? You're concerned you won't want to complete that many or you're concerned you'll be fired before that?

double-quotes-end.png

confused.gif

Glenn are we missing something here? 120k miles is roughly a year, maybe 13 months.

What is your goal with all of this minutiae? You seem to be more focused on a what-if failure scenario than planning your success.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Glenn...you are not alone in your concern. I entered OTR Trucking in my early 50s. So I get it.

It just seems to me you are gravitating to the negative, attempting to ensure a safety net. The absolute best way to doing that is focusing on your preparation to succeed.

There are no guarantees; but I promise if you apply yourself with 100% focus and effort you are highly likely to succeed.

And the 120k miles? Is no different than tge one year commitment required by all Paid CDL Training Programs

I know at some point you have seen the belie links. Redirect your focus on understanding the content and curriculum if the High Road instead of a micro examination of possible points of failure. You hold the key to your own success, an element that no school or extended training can replace.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More