Cdl Road Test Hazmat Crossing

Topic 22114 | Page 1

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John C.'s Comment
member avatar

I took my cdl roadtest last week. The instructor failed me because he said I didn’t explain everything you do at a hazmat crossing.

* turn 4 ways on about 200 feet before the crossing

* stop 50 feet before the crossing

* both windows down to listen for train

* look both ways for train

* crossing the track with both hands on the wheel without shifting

* mirror check once my trailer has crossed the track

He mentioned something about checking for an outage and that I didn’t explain that I would do that. I’m lost as to what he expected there.

Any state certified testers that can help? I retest Tuesday morning at 9am. I’ve passed everything but the road test

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Huzul's Comment
member avatar

An outage what the hell i didn't even say anything about that on my test either and had no issue. Maybe the guy wants to be a jerk and to miss one thing and get everything else is BS anyways i would call in on the guy to be honest bro.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm confused why you would be asked about a hazmat situation for your road test. After I parked the truck after the road test my examiner asked me how would you approach a railroad crossing without lights/arms in a NON-HAZMAT situation. I informed her I would turn off the radio, open windows and slow down to listen for a train while looking both ways as I approached. In school this was very briefly mentioned , and I honestly just started throwing out things I deemed common sense. I'm not sure exactly what answer they're looking for, perhaps ask your instructor from school. Erroll, if you read this what have you guys been instructing at swift academy?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

This is the way I was taught :

1. Put right turn signal on and move all the way over to right most lane when clear. 2. Once in right lane put on 4ways 3. As you approach the tracks check for obstructions,clearance and trains. 4. Stop between 50 and 100 feet of the track, roll windows down and look and listen for trains 5. Select proper gear and continue across the tracks without stopping or shifting ***while still watching for trains*** 6. Once trailer crosses tracks, cancel four ways and move back into proper lane.

So you have to check for trains three times. This is the exact verbal I was taught and used to pass the test.

icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

I am just confused as to why you would have to do this on a road test for a regular CDL. When I tested I had to do an emergency stop but not a Hazmat crossing. This is very strange to me especially the questions about the outage. Best of luck on your retest. Let us know how it goes.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

John C.'s Comment
member avatar

He said they make everyone do it so that in the future if you carry hazmat you know what to do.

I’ll retest in the morning but I’m going to a different testing site. This guy acts like he just wants you to enroll in the school and spend 6k or they won’t pass you. It’s a little overboard if you ask me.

I am just confused as to why you would have to do this on a road test for a regular CDL. When I tested I had to do an emergency stop but not a Hazmat crossing. This is very strange to me especially the questions about the outage. Best of luck on your retest. Let us know how it goes.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Old School's Comment
member avatar
This guy acts like he just wants you to enroll in the school and spend 6k or they won’t pass you.

Okay, are you trying to get your CDL without going through a school? If so, how are you planning to use your new license?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
John C.'s Comment
member avatar

Yea. I’m doing it without the school.

I passed his morning, I’m going to work for a towing service locally. I’ll be training in the truck for the first few weeks before going alone.

double-quotes-start.png

This guy acts like he just wants you to enroll in the school and spend 6k or they won’t pass you.

double-quotes-end.png

Okay, are you trying to get your CDL without going through a school? If so, how are you planning to use your new license?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

ironmike's Comment
member avatar

Hey John, Congratulations on passing and getting your class A license.smile.gif

Here's the deal spoken from California... Every DMV examiner is a different person and may do things and see things their own way and they are continually being re trained, especially when complaints come in. If all goes well then they will just keep doing what they are doing until a complaint comes in and their supervisor sits them down and tells them no more of this and most likely sends them to Sacramento, California for re training. And be it known that most of the DMV examiners that test you do NOT have a class A license and have NO experience driving a truck.shocked.png So they don't see the importance and the real significance of many things as a driver sees them such as lack of knowledge of a hazmat stop when the applicant doesn't even have a hazmat endorsement to legally haul hazmat. They are trained to "examen" and not to drive.

If you have a hazmat endorsement, the DMV examiner may make a statement to you in his or her opening introductory statement when he introduces himself and gives a little speech about what is about to happen and what he expects..... The statement will go something like, "I expect you to drive today as if you are carrying a hazmat load in your trailer". That means you have to do the full hazmat stop at a railroad crossing or anywhere it applies. If you don't do it properly to the examiners expectations, then you may fail. If you don't have the hazmat endorsement then as I understand it they are not allowed to fail you on the drive for not doing a hazmat stop. If you applied for the hazmat but it is still in process and the hazmat hasn't cleared and the examiner fails you on the drive specifically for not doing the hazmat stop, then you have an argument at the office counter there at the dmv. I personally witnessed the fail overturned into a pass when this was discovered.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

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