Dakota's Prime Inc. Diary

Topic 22225 | Page 6

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INIKITS's Comment
member avatar

G-Town, thank you for the well thought out response. I agree with you completely, I think both of our personalities can clash pretty hard and I normally don’t like discomfort or when someone is irritated with me. So, I definitely need to toughen up some for sure. Like I said, I don’t think he’s a bad guy or anything I just don’t think his training style is suited for me maybe. I also agree that communication hasn’t been 100% probably from either side. What he may think is clear, concise instruction, to me, sounds like a really vague indication to do something. I should be asking for more clear instruction more often. Though when I do he kinda makes it sound like a dumb question sometimes hahaha. I really do need more time on backing, but I’ve read lots of others stories and figured this would come with time. I honestly don’t think I will be too horrible at it, I just need a lot more practice.

Also, I’ll own up to the fact that the back I did where I damaged the truck wasn’t really tight at all. It was wide open and there weren’t any other trucks coming into the loading/receiving area. I kinda didn’t know that the truck would go all the way into the trailer until it happened and I was kinda like “well yeah, duh, of course it can.” On top of that, I was so focused on trying to find the spot I was trying to get into at the back of the trailer I wasn’t noticing how close the trailer got to the tractor. I do think he should’ve been somewhere I could see/hear him if I was doing something wrong though.

We stopped by our next pickup and i’ve been sitting outside of this truck stop. I think I really just need some space from him. I don’t want there to be bad blood or anything, because once more, I think he’s a good guy.

I know this has all come off kind of whiney and unnecessary but I feel like i just needed to vent. I don’t want to argue with him and I’m trying to keep the peace between us.

All in all I appreciate you guys listening and giving feedback. I just want to learn and get out there on my own. I knew what I signed up for when I started this. I just gotta stick it out.

INIKITS I've been following your saga and have a couple of observations I want to share that hopefully will help you.

Overall I think you are doing a decent job as a student, despite the obvious personality conflict. That said, try to focus more on what you are doing and not allow his quirky behavior to negatively influence or distract your learning effort. Emotional responses to his attitude is only going to make it worse. Try to be strong and toughen up a bit. If he is not being clear with you, reiterate your request for information more firmly. Regardless of what happens with him, going forward with your next trainer discuss how they are going to train you and what they expect from you. The inverse, make a list of everything you believe is an area of improvement like trip-planning and setups for backing. I suggest getting into the habit of regular, daily communication. Listening skills are extremely important during training; listen to understand and not to reply.

Trucking is a very tough and unforgiving business. Try your best to think through problems and challenges rationally and logically. Avoid the emotional response/reaction, it only exascerbates the situation.

Last but not least; your current trainer is partially to blame for damaging the cab faring (fin) during the backing attempt in New Jersey. Two things to consider, your fifth backing attempt must have been a tight spot, otherwise you would not have been jacked at a 90 degree angle. If your trainer had been doing his job, he would have offered a warning that as the tractor approaches a 90 plus degree angle to the trailer, keep an eye on the faring. Don't buy into him blaming you entirely for this mishap, he was lazy in his responsibility to provide the proper guidance based on the situation.

I am glad you are moving-on to the next step on someone else's truck. Be strong, think and don't allow anyone, including a trainer to rush you.

Good luck.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

You are doing it again...worrying too much about what other people think or feel. We are here to help. Your job right here and now is to stop worrying about your trainer's feelings, or lack there-of. Squeeze every possibly bit of usable information from him before you bid him a fond farewell...

It's your training, not his. You gotta "own it" from here on out.

Good luck, be safe and keep the shiny side up!

INIKITS's Comment
member avatar

Good catch, G-Town. I didn’t even notice, haha. I will work on this to the best of my ability.

I’m excited again! I just need a nap I think. I’m not 100% on the plan so I’ll double check when I get to the truck, but I THINK we’re shooting straight for SpriMo once we get loaded at 2100 tonight.

You are doing it again...worrying too much about what other people think or feel. We are here to help. Your job right here and now is to stop worrying about your trainer's feelings, or lack there-of. Squeeze every possibly bit of usable information from him before you bid him a fond farewell...

It's your training, not his. You gotta "own it" from here on out.

Good luck, be safe and keep the shiny side up!

Clay Knight's Comment
member avatar

Well, sounds like you're learning some things. Not all personalities jive with each other. Hopefully you get what you need from your time with him in regards to driving the truck and pass your tests. Moving forward I hope you get a trainer for next phase that you mesh a little better with. No matter what as you learn and get better things will get easier for you. I'm nervous to get started pretty soon. Hoping to get my permit pretty soon here in California and head to Utah after that. I think my blood pressure is stable in a good range and I'm wrapping up a few things here at home before I begin my journey. I've really appreciated your updates and information during your training. It's very helpful to get a glimpse of what a student goes through. Keep your head up and eyes on the prize. Best of luck.

icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

Hey man really love reading your updates. Yes I agree it does suck about the accident but that is the risk a trainer takes on becoming a trainer. I am at almost 2 years here at Prime and still make mistakes all the time. No one is perfect and no one will ever be. All you can do is own it, accept it, learn from it and move on. Just know I am pulling for you 100% and can't wait to read about all the great things you do and learn in the TNT phase. You got this.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Let me say this, if you don’t feel ready to test out then speak to Steve or Linda about some backing & local driving help with their trainers. When I failed my road test the second time, they sent me out with an amazing trainer named Brett. He had me driving all around Springfield during rush hour. This gave me the confidence boost I needed to pass my final attempt at the road test. Also, did said trainer teach you the proper reference points for each backing maneuver? Good luck on finding a good resolution to your predicament. In my case, Prime was very supportive & had the resources necessary for me to succeed. Hope this is the same for you.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Nate's Comment
member avatar

Any new updates here? I’m in PSD and my roommate left yesterday with his 2nd trainer for his TNT phase. He said his first PSD trainer talked down to him and gave every little detail while performing a task like he was a child and couldn’t figure things out on his own

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Interesting first post Nate!

So, what do you take away from that information that you just got from a fellow newbie who's as green as the grass?

Welcome to our forum, feel free to join our discussions over in the general conversations area. Post your questions or concerns there and you will find some great Prime drivers and trainers there to help you.

Don't be nervous - we don't bite!

Nate's Comment
member avatar

Interesting first post Nate!

So, what do you take away from that information that you just got from a fellow newbie who's as green as the grass?

Welcome to our forum, feel free to join our discussions over in the general conversations area. Post your questions or concerns there and you will find some great Prime drivers and trainers there to help you.

Don't be nervous - we don't bite!

I take everything with a grain of salt from what he said until I’m in that position. He is 21 and doesn’t have a “dominant” attitude or tough skin, so maybe he just got his feelings hurt or didn’t apply himself in PSD training. I look forward to getting out on the road and learning from a good mentor who will hopefully set me up for success in the long run

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Nate, I hope you get a great mentor too! Here's the way you need to approach it. Realize that it's extremely easy for stress to build in you or your mentor while in training. To be honest with you, most trainees are uncomfortable with the whole process. When you get started in trucking it is almost always a rude awakening. Most of us realized right away that we had false expectations, and that can really upset your apple cart if you're not careful.

Getting started in trucking is really tough. You will work longer, harder, and more stressful hours than you ever dreamed. Part of the whole process is designed to see how you react to the stress of it all.

Forget all those buzzwords and phrases like "setting you up for success," or "setting you up for failure." They are meaningless, which is why we see so many of the guys who failed at trucking using them. The only person in any position of authority to set you up for success or failure is you. That's the way it works out here.

Nate, I had the worst trainer/mentor imaginable. It had no negative effect on my career. I learned what I could from him and ignored his stupidity and arrogance. I did what I had to do to get to the next level. That is what you have to do. When I got ready to go solo, the thing that impressed the people in the office was only that I had stuck it out with my trainer. To them, that showed I had what it takes to succeed at trucking.

So, hang in there and go into your training with a tenacious attitude that won't be put off. Reach for your goal and make it happen. No blaming others, no pointing fingers. That tough looking guy in the mirror is the only one who can get you through this successfully. Trust him!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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