Trying To Get Hired

Topic 22257 | Page 4

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Robsteeler's Comment
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Rainy, I'm a northern Pennsylvania boy, but I've lived here for close to thirty years. My wife grew up in Bellmawr so that's why we're here. I'm looking to sell and move South in the next few years. Tired of how expensive NJ is.

G-Town's Comment
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Called and left a vmail with a recruiter friend of mine at Swift. ..I'll let you know what she has to say.

Robsteeler's Comment
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Wow, that's awesome. Thanks so much.

Robsteeler's Comment
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Just got a call from Prime and have been given a report date in two weeks! I won't get too excited though, because I heard that before, from Roehl, lol! We'll see what happens between now and then!

Robsteeler's Comment
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They called my job references yesterday. Recruiter messaged that it looks good and they'll be getting a bus ticket to me soon! Looks like I'll be going to Springfield! 😄

Robsteeler's Comment
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Very much torn now. I'm tentatively scheduled to report to Prime next Monday, but Schneider called back and offered the paid training with an affiliate school out in Ohio. They train differently. With Prime I'd train mostly in the truck on the road. With Schneider I'd train at the school pad. Less time on the trainers truck with Schneider too. That's good and bad. Benefits are pretty close, but Schneider recruiter says I could get hometime every week instead of every other week like the regional with Prime. I just don't know who to go with. I'll be stuck with whoever I choose for a year, so I'd like to make the right choice. Any advice is welcome.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Retired Army (soon)'s Comment
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I don't drive yet, but I have been on here reading everything. Not to knock one over the other, but I feel like Prime has a good program to learn from. If I don't get in with Jim Palmer, I think prime would be my next choice. Jim Palmer for me, would be training in the same town I grew up and close to where I want to transition for OTR to a dedicated or regional route down the road. Sometimes, indecision is the worst than no decision.

To me, its all about getting a good base, and taking it from there.

Best of luck.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Splitter's Comment
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Very much torn now. I'm tentatively scheduled to report to Prime next Monday, but Schneider called back and offered the paid training with an affiliate school out in Ohio. They train differently. With Prime I'd train mostly in the truck on the road. With Schneider I'd train at the school pad. Less time on the trainers truck with Schneider too. That's good and bad. Benefits are pretty close, but Schneider recruiter says I could get hometime every week instead of every other week like the regional with Prime. I just don't know who to go with. I'll be stuck with whoever I choose for a year, so I'd like to make the right choice. Any advice is welcome.

Hi Robsteeler, I’m in Prime’s TNT phase of my training now & I am learning tons. The process worked for me, even though I had a huge case of nerves & anxiety when it came to testing.

The way it works at Prime is like this. The 1st week is crammed with orientation & screening processes. You do computer based training modules (videos), a basic agility test, DOT physical/drug screening & simulator class. While you do all of this, you have to pass your CLP at DMV & practice your pre-trip inspection. Please take advantage of the High Road training program & Daniel B.’s pretrip pdf download on here.

After you pass all of the above, you go on the road with a trainer or some stay behind for more Pad training. In this phase, you’ll be learning hands on what the job entails & real world driving knowledge. My issue with this part was that I didn’t get much local driving practice. I drove mostly on the highway which is basically pointing the truck in the right direction.

When Prime saw that I was struggling with my road trip, I went out locally & drove for 2-3 hours during local rush hour traffic. This boosted my confidence & I passed my road test on my last attempt.

Now my shifting is improved dramatically but I’m still learning more. I’m learning how to deal with the day to day issues that entail being an OTR driver. I’ve crisscrossed this amazing country 3 times while interacting with the shippers, receivers, dispatch, fuel desk, other drivers in the roads, amazing people at the network of truck stops along with the incredible kindness of strangers along this path.

I’m not writing this to convince you to drive for Prime. I’m writing this to show that there will be tons of challenges ahead during this first year of learning a completely new career choice. They are not insurmountable. It’s one year out of your comfort zone which will then open many doors of opportunity for all your significant needs & those of your wife. Who knows, she may end up traveling with you some time down the road.

Good luck to you & yours with whatever decision you reach. God bless & thank you for you service!

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

G-Town's Comment
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Rob, write down the top five important aspects you require of your first employer. Weigh that against both options.

Prime's training is different than Schneider's, longer which might work for you. Schneider's road training is short, perhaps too short (unless something has changed). Prime is arguably the longest training cycle in the industry. Not a bad thing.

There are trade-offs, depends what you want. In the end we have successful and safe drivers from both companies on this forum.

I did get you an answer on Swift. They will hire CDL holders from your area, just not accepting training applicants at the moment. No explanation why. Happens...it's a fluid business.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Robsteeler's Comment
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Thanks guys. I appreciate you looking into that G-town. As far as what I'm doing, I still am undecided. I'm leaning towards Schneider, but there's things I like about Prime too. The Schneider recruiter said they have no problem with my being retired for the last few years, since they know what I've been doing. I don't want to burn any bridges with Prime in case this falls through, but I need to get it figured out really soon because I'm supposed to leave Saturday. Crap.

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