Orientation & Training With Eastern Freightways

Topic 22326 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
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Next time you are on I-78 in that neck of the woods, try the Midway Diner,...off the Midway exit on 78.

Mike B.'s Comment
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Next time you are on I-78 in that neck of the woods, try the Midway Diner,...off the Midway exit on 78.

It sounds like we go out that way a lot so I definitely will. Thank you!

Mike B.'s Comment
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Day 4 of OTR (On The Road) Training

I was to tired to post for day 4 so i'm going from memory.. Headed out around 6:45 after a pre-trip. First time driving I76 through Pa. Man those hills are crazy. From what I hear nothing like out west but still pretty big. Went through the 4 tunnels which was cool. Made it to the receiver, unstrapped and got unloaded really quick. We then headed down the road about 20 miles to the next shipper. Loaded up some lumber heading to MA. Another quick load and learned how to strap and tarp this type of load.

Back to I76 again. This load was a little different to drive as it was higher than what we have had so far. 76-81-84. Was making good time but it was going to be close. We needed to get to the Montgomery terminal before our 14 ran out so we switched drivers. made it with 9 minutes to spare! Found some dinner and off to bed.

Day 5 of OTR (On The Road) Training

Slept like crap last night & woke up tired. Maybe the week was finally catching up with me. Pre-tripped and headed out to MA. Got to the receiver and un-tarped and unstrapped. Noel showed me how to remove and roll up the straps by yourself. He did the 1st one and I did the 2nd. It wasn't that bad actually. We got unloaded quickly again. I'm liking the fact that there isn't a lot of wait time at the shippers and receivers especially after some stories i've heard about dry van and refer.

A quick Drop n hook from Portsmouth, NH for our load headed out Sunday night at 11pm for a 1-4am delivery in Brooklyn. That should be a treat!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mike B.'s Comment
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Day 6-7 of OTR (On The Road) Training

It’s been an interesting but good week so far. We headed out for Brooklyn at 11pm Sunday night set up for a good week. I did get a 2hr nap in on Sunday trying to prepare for the long overnight. We got to the receiver around 2am. Had to un-tarp and fold on the load as the little narrow street didn’t allow the room for it. It was good to experience this as I’d never thought it was possible before. The load of sheetrock was unloaded very quickly as they had 3 forklifts unloading us. The pre-plan has us bobtailing over to a little town in PA. It must have just been outside of an Amish community as there were horse and buggy road signs and I saw one go by. We get to the shipper around 5:30am and this starts our decline. The load wasn’t ready yet. Call overnight dispatch, he said let me find you a load out of there. 1 hour later we call back. Still working on it. Well after 3 hours of Off Duty we get our load. Sheetrock headed to Everett, Ma an overnight home depot delivery. At this point we decide to take our 10hour break. We get up and head out at 3pm. Loaded and ready to roll. Finally get to Home Depot at 12:30am for a 2 am delivery. Long story short, unloaded by 3:30 and back to bed. Pre plan has us going to NH to get a load headed to New Albany, PA. over 800 miles. Get to the shipper drop a trailer and go to pick up the load. Fix the tarping job raise the landing gear….. Wait one side doesn’t go up. Damn it…. Look underneath and the shaft had sheared off. Call dispatch, Road side will be sent. He gets there and needs a part. 1 hour wait. He comes back and spends 2 hours trying to get it fixed. Something is wrong with the gear… I’ll skip a few things here but we finally head out at 3:30pm. Damn it traffic on 495. Once we hit 90w it was a great ride. Rolling nonstop 70mph to Syracuse. Went to bed as soon as we got here. It’s 8:30am right now and we are grabbing some breakfast before our 8 hr ride to Ohio. It's been a good week overall with some hiccups which I’m glad I could experience. Still loving it. Till next time!

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Mike B.'s Comment
member avatar

It seems I forgot to post day 5.. Hmmm

Day 5 of OTR (On The Road) Training

Slept like crap last night & woke up tired. Maybe the week was finally catching up with me. Pre-tripped and headed out to MA. Got to the receiver and un-tarped and unstrapped. Noel showed me how to remove and roll up the straps by yourself. He did the 1st one and I did the 2nd. It wasn't that bad actually. We got unloaded quickly again. I'm liking the fact that there isn't a lot of wait time at the shippers and receivers especially after some stories i've heard about dry van and refer.

A quick Drop n hook from Portsmouth, NH for our load headed out Sunday night at 11pm for a 1-4am delivery in Brooklyn. That should be a treat!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Mike B.'s Comment
member avatar

I see it. I already posted day 5. HaHa oh well

Day 8 of OTR (On The Road) Training

Not a lot to report on today. We started the morning with some breakfast at Denny's then on to the pre-trip and get rolling. Noel put me in charge of the day today as well as all of the driving. Figuring out my 30 min break, fuel stop etc. Drove in and then back out of Columbus, OH during rush hour. Our day ended around 7pm in Columbus as we are right down the road from the receiver. 519 miles in about 8 1/2-9 hours. 90w is a great interstate. Almost boring at times. Looking forward to dropping this load and getting a load back home.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Retired Army (soon)'s Comment
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Mike B

Sounds like you are getting some good training. I think the thing that stuck out to me was you said your trainer put you in charge for the day...trip planning, stops etc....I have to honestly think back, and I don't think others have posted comments like that. Good to hear all is going well....

Safe Travels Chris

Rob T.'s Comment
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It seems like you're having a good time and doing a great job. Keep it up. By him having you do it on your own is definitely something you'll benefit from. Also a good thing to experience the folding on load, as well as dealing with roadside even though I'm sure at the time you guys weren't too happy.

Mike B.'s Comment
member avatar

Mike B

Sounds like you are getting some good training. I think the thing that stuck out to me was you said your trainer put you in charge for the day...trip planning, stops etc....I have to honestly think back, and I don't think others have posted comments like that. Good to hear all is going well....

Safe Travels Chris

Hey Chris.

Yes the on hands training has been great. My trainer has been slowly working me into taking charge and this week will be all mine while he monitors and makes suggestions.

Thank you

Mike B.'s Comment
member avatar

It seems like you're having a good time and doing a great job. Keep it up. By him having you do it on your own is definitely something you'll benefit from. Also a good thing to experience the folding on load, as well as dealing with roadside even though I'm sure at the time you guys weren't too happy.

Rob,

Thank you. My trainer says I'm doing great. I notice little things I need to work on and point them out and he usually confirms or tells me no you're doing fine. Yes It was a good experience and yes at the time I was like "No way seriously" but glad I was able to do it.

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