Bikes And Pets

Topic 22521 | Page 1

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Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I picked back up with Knight Transportation about 4 months ago, I'm starting to settle into the flow of things, but I've got two questions: One, I drive a Volvo (2017) that has one of the bars along the back and I've seen some drivers with bicycles strapped on the back and haven't been able to figure out how they've pulled it off. I just want to make sure I can secure one properly if I bring it along.

Two) I'm thinking about getting a pet, have searched the tags but haven't found anything on the thought process of whether or not a person should actually /get/ a pet.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

I can't help with the pet thing but have you thought of just keeping a bike in the cab?If your in a Volvo 780 you have more than enough room for it. Just take the front wheel off if need be.

I'M in a small Keworth flattop otherwise I'd have my bike with me now. But I sure ain't keeping my very nice road bike on the back of a truck to get covered in "road nasties" and rust.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I'd be okay keeping the bike in there for a short time but I already feel a bit crowded in the cab and trying to throw a bike on a regular basis does not excite me

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I know most guys want big.macho dogs... but you need space for the dog, bowls, food. plus you need to walk the dog. this is not always convenient when pressed for time or at a customer. some customers will not allow you to walk the dog. cats are.much easier, but even a cat will.demand attention when you are exhausted. whether dog or cat you by law need to make sure they have rabies vacs and it is recommended to use frontline or advantage or other pest control. my cat never leaves my truck, yet wound up with fleas. the vet said it was.most likely from one of.the slaughterhouses i went to. i use a pine litter and smells are.limited. my cat loves the truck, but keep.in.mind the company may charge you a fee, or a cleaning fee when turning in the truck. also, you may noit be eligible to train with a pet. also, when the teuck is in the shop, finding a.pet motel might be limited in some areas.

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Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm more of a cat person myself anyways, although there are some dog breeds I really enjoy, pit bulls being one of them, but I'm aware of their reputation. Honestly, I'm more iffy because I've never had a pet before of my own at home. We had animals but I was never the one to take care of them primarily. There are some days where I'd really love the company though.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

My kitty gives me some good laughs...he loves the red lights on backing trucks. heres a pic where he is fascinated by a red sign lol

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then greeted.me.upon my return

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Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Daniel B. Bike Rides

Take a look at that long thread. I used to do the same thing for many, many months. I strapped my BMX bike on the back of the truck (page 2) and then made a video on how I had it mounted with a passed DOT inspection to prove that my way is legal (page 7).

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

You're a life saver, Daniel! :D

Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
member avatar

Since you have never had a pet before don't start in a truck. Learn the job first. The dog would have to be house broken and trained. You would have to make time to walk it several times per day. You would also have to pick up the poop to dispose of it properly. If you need a vet in an emergency on the road, what do you do? What if you have to go to a shipper receiver that doesn't allow pets on their property? You would have to find a vet or doggy day care close by and hope they have hours that work with your schedule. You have to keep up to date health and vaccination records with you. If you had a breed that sheds, that's more mess in your truck. What if the dog pukes all over the place as your traveling down the highway and there is no place to stop near by.

I have two dogs at home and would love to take one of them on the road with me. However, due to the reasons, I stated above, I choose to leave them home. I have owned dogs all my life, I spent many years in the pet industry, and fully understand what it takes to own and train a dog. This is why I say, gain experience before making this decision. Research different breeds, and how to care for them. Good luck.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks, Scott. That was the thing I was sort of concerned about, is learning how to deal with the animal compounded by not even being at home proper.

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