Leaving After Contract

Topic 22534 | Page 2

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Jose R.'s Comment
member avatar

From what gathered from other drivers and company’s some pay a flat rate added to your base pay for all miles so it eliminates the need for more pay on just hazmat while others pay for just the hazmat load and some pay like you said 20$ etc. Don’t get me wrong Prime is great but as a company driver my fleet manager and the staff I’ve spoken to have told me theirs no incentive for hazmat, tanker isn’t offered in the west. I was told by one person to move divisions. I’m just unsure as of now so I wanted to get input on ideas because I’m on track for a 1 year good performance known as Prime time certified.

So, follow Rainy's advise. She has been with Prime for 3 years and knows how to get things done there. If it's more money you want, how much?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jose...

Rainy just presented the forum with her second year Prime pay total. It's over $70,000.

All BS aside, if you are sure that you surpass that at you new employer, go for it. Otherwise, I think you are being rather short sighted and maybe focused on something minor and not considering the bigger picture.

Jose R.'s Comment
member avatar

She’s a trainer ? I did look up her post that was interesting but with everyone’s input I appreciate it . But how does everyone choose where is best for their career. Miles? Percentage ? Being a company driver I prefer it this way to experience the road and when I spoke to Prime they were telling me I should lease and I think I’m not ready for a lease cause of payments and lack of knowledge in the industry I’m trying to position my self to work my way up to something like that but I want to gradually do it.

Jose...

Rainy just presented the forum with her second year Prime pay total. It's over $70,000.

All BS aside, if you are sure that you surpass that at you new employer, go for it. Otherwise, I think you are being rather short sighted and maybe focused on something minor and not considering the bigger picture.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jose, the thing is, Leasing is not a step up. Just the opposite.

Please read this: Natural Progression of a Truck Driver

Take a look at that and then hit the blog for other articles related to leasing and Owner Operator.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes i had few months training pay last year, but also took it easy the rest if the year lol.

call Lance in SLC reefer company division and he should be able to confirm hazmat is $50 more per load. I know Christian on here ran Hazmat at Prime reefer and he can confirm as well if he pops on. I thought Diver Driver had it??? Adam has Hazmat and i think his first load was hazmat, and i believe he said it is $50 bonus as well

Who in Prime told you to go lease? Couldnt have been your FM...he would lose a good driver. that wouldnt make sense.

did you try calling the tanker division? they would have better answers than any reefer manager.

Brian Singleton is the terminal manager for SLC. email him. all in house have their first inital last name @primeinc.com (i didnt want to put it here in case of spiders/bots).

we do have a select few of tankers running the west. i have seen them.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes i had few months training pay last year, but also took it easy the rest if the year lol.

call Lance in SLC reefer company division and he should be able to confirm hazmat is $50 more per load. I know Christian on here ran Hazmat at Prime reefer and he can confirm as well if he pops on. I thought Diver Driver had it??? Adam has Hazmat and i think his first load was hazmat, and i believe he said it is $50 bonus as well

Who in Prime told you to go lease? Couldnt have been your FM...he would lose a good driver. that wouldnt make sense.

did you try calling the tanker division? they would have better answers than any reefer manager.

Brian Singleton is the terminal manager for SLC. email him. all in house have their first inital last name @primeinc.com (i didnt want to put it here in case of spiders/bots).

we do have a select few of tankers running the west. i have seen them.

I love Lance Brightshue. He was my FM for a long time. I earned multiple 'Company Driver of the Fleet' awards under him. By far the best OTR dispatcher I have ever had the pleasure of dealing with.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Jose, you need to decide what is best for you. some people want more money, others want home time. some want freedom like OTR and others want dedicated. so its hard for us to tell you what is best. we will all have different answers.

i would absolutely hate dedicated, i know it. but i also do want more time off...so i sorta compromise from time to time and take 34 breaks at a hotel at the terminal or at tourist spots.

for me, not having the over head of a home and utilities allowed me to pay debts and bank money, plus splurge a little from time to time. other people need that extra income for home expenses and family.

what do you want and need? keep in mind that every company or position will have its own unique challenges.

you said you would like to pull doubles but why? cause they look cool, or cause you like the way the runs are? have you taken a good look at the winter highways....sprinkled all over them are doubles. im not saying dont go for it, but just like the tanker surge, you need to respect and understand the challenges. good luck!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Jose R.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you for this answer my main concern is just managing to progress in my driving career I want to pull doubles because I’ve known two people who’ve told me that you can make a good living pulling doubles and triples but just like any other division their are obstacles. I’m just at a point where I’m considering what’s best for me. Keep in mind I’m only 22 so I want to be somewhere I can make more miles and money wise because I want to help my parents and family back in CA. Home time isn’t to much a concern I’m not married or have kids at this point I’m just trying to figure out where I can move forward and help more back home even if it’s otr right now. I don’t usually go home for 6-7 weeks at a time. But don’t get me wrong Prime is Great I love Prime been best decision I’ve made when looking for company sponsored schools.

Jose, you need to decide what is best for you. some people want more money, others want home time. some want freedom like OTR and others want dedicated. so its hard for us to tell you what is best. we will all have different answers.

i would absolutely hate dedicated, i know it. but i also do want more time off...so i sorta compromise from time to time and take 34 breaks at a hotel at the terminal or at tourist spots.

for me, not having the over head of a home and utilities allowed me to pay debts and bank money, plus splurge a little from time to time. other people need that extra income for home expenses and family.

what do you want and need? keep in mind that every company or position will have its own unique challenges.

you said you would like to pull doubles but why? cause they look cool, or cause you like the way the runs are? have you taken a good look at the winter highways....sprinkled all over them are doubles. im not saying dont go for it, but just like the tanker surge, you need to respect and understand the challenges. good luck!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

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