Truck Stops And Old Time Trucking

Topic 22743 | Page 1

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Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
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I have posted on the topics page under Truck Stops for some conversations regarding this topic but haven't received any replies. Do you all think that a new forum on just truckstops, favorite or hated brands, foods either sit down or fast food, parking,etc. can be addressed here on Trucking Truth? After all almost everyone out here driving for a living has at some point had to frequent truck stops for all that they are or are not. It is just a thought and I was hoping we could start a talk about them as it is also an important part of OTR trucking. I for one have been driving since Pure Truckstops became Union 76, then Truckstops of America and now Travel Centers of America, the mergers of Petro to TA, Flying J and Wilco into Pilot, the growth of Loves and the closing of so many Mom & Pop operations. There is a lot to talk about and probably more to come. If not I'll understand and stay in the background and do my truck stop information searches in private. I hope I have not bored or offended anyone.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

I can't say I share your passion of truckstops. I started driving a tanker just so I could stay at tank washes instead of truck stops.

Myself I fuel where I'm told for the most part and try to eat and shower elsewhere but I'm not always successful at staying out of the ole Peelots and Loves.

If you download the Trucker Path app you can find all the info you could ever want on truckstops and the restaurants that are close to them and the amenities they have individually.

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
member avatar

Cwc, Thanks for your reply. It's not a passion but sometimes a necessity. Back when I started driving in 1970 things were quite different than today. For most of us there was no power steering, no A/C and some slept on a piece of plywood across to seats because of no bunks. The truckstop became a haven for information about the "coops" or "bear traps" and it was your place to eat because there surely were not APU's or refrigerators in the trucks. I was just trying to see if anyone would like to share the past or the present either good or bad experiences in truck stops. After all some or most of us still have to fuel there and the HOS does force most of us to seek their parking facilities like it or not. Thanks for your reply.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

I'm all for nostalgia but this forum is for new drivers including myself so we just don't have it.

These days unlike the days of old we have more trucks and less spots. Which is probably one of the reasons we have APUs , refrigerators and inverters.

Now anyone who shares my point of view on truckstops looks for rest areas or Wal-Mart to park knowing full well not to show up at a truckstop after dark looking for parking. Don't try and take a shower at 6-9 pm. And stay away from the fuel island at 6-8am. From 10am to 3pm you can walk right in and take a shower no wait.

I don't absolutely hate truckstops but they eat up your clock and in turn cost you money so I tend to avoid them as much as possible. But your right. It's not always possible.

The best ribs I've ever had came from "The double nickle" in Haiti,MO I-55 exit 19. Looks like the place Salmonella was discovered. But for 8-11$ these women pile ribs into a Styrofoam to go box and my god they are good.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
member avatar

Cwc, I thank you for the conversation and that's what it is about, conversation, advice and opinions. Yours is well taken and appreciated and hopefully it will bring more drivers onboard to express theirs. Thanks, have a great evening and above all be safe.

JD's Comment
member avatar

I have posted on the topics page under Truck Stops for some conversations regarding this topic but haven't received any replies. Do you all think that a new forum on just truckstops, favorite or hated brands, foods either sit down or fast food, parking,etc. can be addressed here on Trucking Truth? After all almost everyone out here driving for a living has at some point had to frequent truck stops for all that they are or are not. It is just a thought and I was hoping we could start a talk about them as it is also an important part of OTR trucking. I for one have been driving since Pure Truckstops became Union 76, then Truckstops of America and now Travel Centers of America, the mergers of Petro to TA, Flying J and Wilco into Pilot, the growth of Loves and the closing of so many Mom & Pop operations. There is a lot to talk about and probably more to come. If not I'll understand and stay in the background and do my truck stop information searches in private. I hope I have not bored or offended anyone.

I first drove across the country in 1974, the only truck stop that was around then and now I've seen since I started driving again is the 76 fuel center on I-75 exit 76 I stop there every chance I get. I know the old stucky's resturants were also a place that didn't mind truckers stopping but back then there was no rules for the most part, you ran as long as you wanted. I'd haul alfalfa hay to Texas and bring back mining supplies to the Virginia's. When I turned 18 I'd load the sleeper with around 50 cases of lone star beer that cost me $4.50 a case and I'd sell it for $8.00 when I got back home I thought I was quite the business man........once a Tennessee deputy stopped me for running 117 on I-40 between Memphis and Nashville it cost me 5 cases to continue on.......the good ole days are gone......

JD

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Yuuyo Y.'s Comment
member avatar

once a Tennessee deputy stopped me for running 117 on I-40 between Memphis and Nashville it cost me 5 cases to continue on.......the good ole days are gone......

JD

117. Is that mph? In a truck?wtf-2.gif

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

JD's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

once a Tennessee deputy stopped me for running 117 on I-40 between Memphis and Nashville it cost me 5 cases to continue on.......the good ole days are gone......

JD

double-quotes-end.png

117. Is that mph? In a truck?wtf-2.gif

Yes, with the alfalfa it would run 117 with the heavier mine supply only around 92 unless I was on a down grade I loved that old kenworth. Aubrey Paul owned it and built it to run

JD

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
member avatar

JD, Thanks for sharing your old days experience. It is my intention for anyone and everyone to tell fellow drivers their experiences with truckstops and driving in general. Not boring but just to show some differences with the real world of today. Some will be funny, some sad, some true and others not so true. So what, let's have some fun.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

once a Tennessee deputy stopped me for running 117 on I-40 between Memphis and Nashville it cost me 5 cases to continue on.......the good ole days are gone......

JD

double-quotes-end.png

117. Is that mph? In a truck?wtf-2.gif

Realize that modern trucks are programmed and governed for fuel efficiency. They are programmed to only allow so much fuel. They are programmed to only go so high in the RPMs. They are governed to reduced speeds.

A modern truck with factory preset programming and not governed would have no issues getting above 85 mph. The questions will be: how heavy you are and how long it will take to get there.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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