Intro And Questions From Mr. & Mrs. K2

Topic 22747 | Page 2

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Big Scott's Comment
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I think you both have a lot of talking to do. Have you started High Road CDL Training Program?

It is most important to pick a company that will fit your needs. To team or not to team? Type of freight? Home time? Benefits? Per Diem or not? And more.

I trained with and drive for CFI. I am their biggest fan. They send students to one of two private schools in Missouri for four weeks. Then you go back to Joplin for four days of orientation. At this point you would each go out with a trainer for at least 7500 miles, approximately three weeks. Then it's back to Joplin to upgrade and get your truck. CDL Training is fast and furious, like boot camp. Trucking is very much learn as you go. CFI is always looking for teams. Married teams are best for many reasons. CFI pulls dry van. We go to all 48 lower states and Canada.

Where a company has terminals is not important. Where you live is a busy freight lane.

I hope I gave you more to think about. Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Turtle's Comment
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I believe what Patrick was referring to is the "rolling" 34, something a lot of teams do to be the most productive. Here's one scenario:

Let's say you drive all day Sunday, end your shift at midnight, and Kevin takes over. Your 34 starts right there. Kevin then puts in his 12hrs for drive + pre/post trip, ending at noon Monday. That's where his 34 will start. You're all rested up by then, but he's exhausted and needs to eat, shower, and sleep. 10hrs later you're both hopefully rested up enough to spend maybe 12hrs together before you are eligible to drive again at 10am Tue.

The other more likely scenario is where you act as a solo driver for a couple of days while Kevin just hangs out and gets in a 34. After doing so, he takes over and drives solo while you get your 34.

Neither scenario gives you a true 34 hours to spend together doing what you wish. But like the others have said, you can always set something up with your dispatcher to gain you some free time. That's where it all comes back to the value of being a top-tier driver, or team. You can get many special favors as long as you're out there getting it done. Simply requesting a load that has a little extra time on it can get you both a 34 that you can enjoy together.

To be clear, nobody here is trying to dissuade you from this. We just want you to have a more accurate picture of what goes on. I wouldn't say your expectations are unrealistic in the least. Perhaps a little overly optimistic, in the sense that things almost never go perfectly out here. Just when you think you have a schedule figured out, you get that blasted QC message saying the load changed, and you have to change your plans accordingly. It is what it is.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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Danielsahn wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

My brother in law and his wife team. They worked out a schedule, Along with their FM , that allows them to spend good quality time together, and they average around 6000 miles per week. They drive for Covenant. It is possible to find a schedule that works for you, but as Patrick said, the freight will always determine when the truck is rolling, and when it can be parked.

double-quotes-end.png

After reading the thread that Old School referred me to above and your comments here, I think maybe we should not be quick to stop considering Covenant! Did your brother in law and his wife start there as newbies? If so, I am curious about what their experience of training together was like.

Thanks for your response!

He drove for Southern Refrigerated, for a couple years. When his wife decided to get her CDL , he "transferred" over to Covenant, after she finished training. They are "sister" companies. You will often see them pulling each other's trailers. They have been in the truck together almost a year.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Kate K2's Comment
member avatar

Big Scott said:

I think you both have a lot of talking to do. Have you started High Road CDL Training Program?

Yes, we sure do. This has been my research project right now as he is focused on some other things right now. I am collecting info for our ongoing discussions. He may have some other ideas and thoughts. I have started the High Road Training Program. Mainly because I was afraid this was beyond me and if THAT didn't make any sense to me, I knew I was barking up the wrong tree. I am almost 30% of the way through it, learning a lot and doing quite well on the tests.

It was also important to me to start there because I know NOTHING about auto/truck mechanics. My husband and I have a running joke that to put me to sleep all he has to do is start talking about compression ratios. **head falls and I start snoring**

Big Scott also said:

Where a company has terminals is not important. Where you live is a busy freight lane.

I hope I gave you more to think about. Good luck.

Wow. I didn't think of that. Thanks! You just opened up a lot of options to us. I said something to my husband about this just now and he responded, "Well, of course! We're only about 15 miles from I-70!" He seemed to get that from the start LOL. I'm learning every day.

Thanks for your help and the info on CFI.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Kate K2's Comment
member avatar

Turtle wrote:

I believe what Patrick was referring to is the "rolling" 34, something a lot of teams do to be the most productive. Here's one scenario:

Ah! Thanks. Yes, I have seen that term here but thought it meant something different. Thanks for explaining that so clearly.

And Turtle also wrote:

To be clear, nobody here is trying to dissuade you from this. We just want you to have a more accurate picture of what goes on. I wouldn't say your expectations are unrealistic in the least. Perhaps a little overly optimistic, in the sense that things almost never go perfectly out here.

I don't feel that anyone is being at all discouraging. I came here for exactly that - realistic info on what this might be like. I think knowing what you are getting into is the first step towards building the foundation for success and I appreciate what this site does to help in that area.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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