Prime,Swift, And Maverick Training

Topic 23236 | Page 6

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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Dan, the problem isn't that you're saying these things. The real problem is that you're thinking them in the first place. 95% of everything you're talking about either has no basis in reality or has absolutely nothing to do with the task you've been given, which is to learn to drive a truck.

If you'll focus your mind on the task in front of you things will go just fine. You just have to filter your thoughts. Make sure they're helpful and relevant to your task. If they're not going to help you become a better driver then just drop em altogether.

If you're struggling with a situation or trying to understand how things work then just let us know and we'll help you understand how things work and what approach to take. That's what we do. We just don't want to see you become cynical or start making crazy assumptions about what's going on around you when none of that is going to help you in any way.

You have one task right now - learn to drive a truck. That's it. Focus on yourself and what you have to do to accomplish that task. This is a common problem we see and I did a podcast about it. Check this out:

Episode 18: Stop The Fear And Doubt, Focus On Your Own Success

's Comment
member avatar

Huh, I stopped at this post because of the Title: Prime,Swift, and Maverick training I was hoping to get a little more info regarding personal experiences of these companies. Disappointed.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Huh, I stopped at this post because of the Title: Prime,Swift, and Maverick training I was hoping to get a little more info regarding personal experiences of these companies. Disappointed.

There was a lot of important information in this discussion. Hopefully you picked up on that. You don't have to worry too much about anyone's specific experiences with specific companies. The way you thrive in this industry works the same no matter what the name is on the side of the door. Our moderators and experienced drivers work for a wide variety of companies doing a variety of different types of trucking. All of them could go to any company they wanted to and make top dollar but they're already happy and making top dollar where they're at because they're amazing drivers who get how this industry works.

So you don't have to worry about too much in the way of company-specific experiences. It's more important to understand what it takes to be a top tier driver. You'll find fantastic success anywhere you go if you understand how it all works.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Huh, I stopped at this post because of the Title: Prime,Swift, and Maverick training I was hoping to get a little more info regarding personal experiences of these companies. Disappointed.

There’s an entire section with diaries of different drivers & their experiences at their chosen company paid training program or commercial driving school or college programs.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dan S.'s Comment
member avatar

Apologies for stealing the thread.

And detracting from its initial subject and topic

Dan S.'s Comment
member avatar

It can be difficult and hard when you find yourself confronted with Natives throwing spheres and shooting poisoned arrows and darts at you,.....

Up to your neck in quicksand, posiouness snakes, scorpions to remember that when YOU FIRST STARTED out?

Your OBJECTIVE was to just drain the swamp?

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dan S.'s Comment
member avatar

Previous via a Marine Sergeant Major.

What seems easy?

Isn't so easy.

Those that do it, make it look easy. So easy it would seem anyone could or can do it.

So simple it's complex.

So complex, it's simple

A paradox.

Under appreciated

Under valued

The American Trucker

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

It can be difficult and hard when you find yourself confronted with Natives throwing spheres and shooting poisoned arrows and darts at you,.....

Up to your neck in quicksand, posiouness snakes, scorpions to remember that when YOU FIRST STARTED out?

Your OBJECTIVE was to just drain the swamp?

Ok, so I have absolutely no idea what you're talking about, to be honest, but you mentioned "to remember when you first started out" so I thought I'd address that.

I remember vividly, in great detail, exactly what it was like when I first started out and I loved every second of it. When I was going to school I used to sit by the Interstate every evening listening to "Roll Me Away" by Bob Seger dreaming of the day when I'd finally get my chance to cruise the country in one of those big, beautiful American big rigs. I couldn't sleep at night I was so excited all the time. It was killing me!

When I finally got my chance I loved every second of it. I remember conversations with my trainer word for word. I remember the first truck stop I ever stopped at, the first meal I ate on the road, the first night I spent in a truck, the first trip to the West Coast when we went from Baltimore to Sacramento.

I remember going through Wyoming thinking, "Wow, this is where the real cowboys roamed!" I remember seeing the Rocky Mountains for the first time. I remember crossing into California thinking, "Wow, this is the real California!"

The entire thing was such an awesome adventure to me I couldn't believe it was real. The fact that I was getting paid for it seemed utterly ridiculous. I would have done it for free. Heck, my buddies and I jumped into an old beat up van and drove to Atlanta from Buffalo and lived in that van for weeks just for the fun of going somewhere we'd never been and starting a new life. We were making $5.50 an hour working in a warehouse before I started trucking. So driving a big rig and making $40,000/year was like living in a castle and getting filthy rich to me!

I spent 15 amazing years on the road and absolutely loved it. But ya see, here's the thing - I'm a true adventurer. I love a challenge. I love the unknown. I want to live an exciting life where every day is unique and you never know what's around the next turn.

I have to admit I'm utterly amazed at the level of complaining I hear all the time from rookie drivers. I always think, "Where is the sense of adventure in these people????" Some people don't have much of that I guess. Maybe they'd be more comfortable working in a factory 8 to 4.

If you're truly an adventurer then trucking is one of the greatest careers imaginable. If you're not filled with wonder at the prospect of driving a beautiful big rig across the country then I don't know what you'd find fun and exciting. Maybe you don't want anything to be exciting or challenging. Many people don't.

But don't for a second think that any of the advice I give is because I don't remember what it was like when I was new. I remember every detail of it. But I'm also the same guy that's getting ready to travel the world climbing the biggest, most beautiful, and most dangerous mountains on every continent. I'm approaching 50 years old and I've just begun my mountain climbing adventures. I've always been an adventurer through and through and I will be to the end.

Trucking was an awesome adventure. I thought it was truly a privilege to have such an amazing opportunity. For those who cry and complain about how hard and unfair everything is in this industry, I truly apologize, because I have a completely different take on the whole thing and I just can't relate.

I was truly cut out for this type of life. Most people aren't. I feel bad for those who wander unexpectedly into trucking, not knowing what a crazy adventure it's going to be. I lost count 20 years ago of how many people I've watched go running like madmen into the distance after just a few short weeks in this industry. If you're not cut out for this then it's going to be a nightmare.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dan S.'s Comment
member avatar

My previous post? Was about THINGS changing / perspectives changing.

WHEN I started out?

My objective was to get my CDL'S?

Now?

My objective is to become a

#1 Safe Truck Driver

#2 Non Hazardous Truck Driver

#3 A PRODUCTIVE Truck Driver

#4 A PRODUCTIVE Asset

#5 Part of the Solution NOT part of the problem

#6 Part of the Answer not part of the Question

My ISSUE isn't so much WITH pay, although that's a variable of the equation?

My ISSUE is I'm NOT properly trained nor willing to put the General Public at risk because of such.

I'd even WOULD voluntarily go extra 10k miles or even more to feel sure and confidant of such.

No, I'm not happy about going x amount of weeks with NPD (No pay due)

That's on me, my mistake, ignorance misunderstanding, whatever?

My greater concern is I'm feeling a lot like a Kamskashi pilot being strapped into a Mitsubishi Zero and being pointed in the general direction of Okinawa?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

To Tim, the original poster of this thread:

You can look on the bright side bro. Training at any company is far easier than following this thread. Sorry you got hijacked.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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