45 Degree /90degree Help

Topic 23256 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Adrian T.'s Comment
member avatar

First ever post on here so please spare me. I have 3 months experience in Flatbed so I never really backed up anywhere. Coming to dry van it's a whole nother game. I actually Just completed my first solo load it went pretty well except for the final backing. It was a tight spot . I didn't ever get it in there so we the repower came and just told em to drop it in the middle of the isle so he could get I.

I have a lot of trouble with the 90 degree or 45 degree backing. I feel like I do better with the 45 degree but it still takes forever to get it in the spot if I even do. I was wondering if anyone had any tips such as set up distance wheel placement anything would be extremely appreciated .

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
andhe78's Comment
member avatar

I have 3 months experience in Flatbed so I never really backed up anywhere.

You CHOSE to never back up. I’ll try to get in a couple backs every day with my flatbed just for the practice. And that is what you need-practice. At three months you should have the beginning of understanding how the trailer and tractor act and react to each other. Find a truck stop at ten am and just practice hitting empty spots. People telling me how to do it never really worked for me, just had to get out there and figure out what worked and what didn’t.

Don’t know if it carries over to dry van , but for me, setup is the most important thing in backing. A good setup will make even a tricky back easier. A bad setup will just cost you minutes trying to recover.

Flatbedders unable to back is a pet peeve of mine. Just because we don’t do it every stop, doesn’t mean we will never do it and sometimes in some bad situations. Being unable to do a necessary part of the job just seems like choosing to not be truly professional at the job, especially since there is no reason to not learn the skill. One of my prouder moments was a month ago, hitting a bay off a blindside and around an s curve on the first try, and the loader telling me he could count on one hand the number of guys who could get it in under ten minutes. Felt good, but it took practicing every day for eight months.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Robsteeler's Comment
member avatar

A lot of the time you can see across the top of your trailer. Not something you can do with a van. It really is a lot different. Did you guys take your test and learn in CDL school with a van though? I know you forget if you don't do something a lot, but don't you get the basics? For 45 I learned a pretty good method. Drive up til your shoulder is in the middle of the hole. Be perpendicular to it about 3 to 5 feet away. I have an auto man so I put it in first gear, creep mode then I don't touch the throttle. Creep up until your shoulder gets to the far side of the next spot/trailer then hard right until your tractor gets to 12:00, then hard left until you get to 9:00. STOP. Don't stop or use throttle the entire time you're moving. Now you straighten the steers and slowly back towards the hole. This will get you pretty close so just GOAL and adjust as needed. You shouldn't need many pull ups to get perfect.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Here is some if what I teach at the Swift Academy (truck school) in Memphis:

(Note: it's hard to do a setup if you aren't sure how to get the trailer into the dock. Also, I'll assume you want to do the classic "90 left" as you sit in the driver seat.)

The first part of your job is to get the back end of the trailer close to the start of the "slot" you are needing into. Besides keeping a decent angle door trailer, not much else matters. But be aware of those things around you that you might crunch into.

The side of the slot closest to you, I'll call the left side, where it will be when you get backed in. It is the easiest to turn toward. The side father away (the right side) is harder. So first aim toward the right side first.

When you start your backing, turn the steering wheel "away" from your destination side, toward the right if you're backng in to the the left.

Brakes off, start backing. Watch the back corner of the trailer (not the tires/ wheels) and watch for it to start heading towards that far (right) corner.

When that happens, stop for a second. The trailer should look like it's going past the far corner of the slot right now. Turn the steering wheel left, either back to straight or maybe one turn past straight. Back up a short distance, and watch the back of the trailer.

You can now pay attention to that left side of the slot, but remember it's hard to get away from it if it gets too close.

On a left backing, a simple right turn on the steering wheel will get you on top of the left corner, but it's almost impossible to get away from it if that happens. So as you turn, favor the right side first.

By now you should be able to look directly out the window at the back of the trailer and left side of your slot. Back up, watch, and add some left turn to start getting into the box.

Once the back of the trailer gets close to that right side point, turn the wheel hard/ all the way LEFT. It's time to start straightening every thing out. Keep a close eye on that left corner. If you think it's coming too close, twist the wheel some right, but not too much.

If everything goes to plan and the back of the trailer is between the left and right sides, turn your steering right and begin pushing the nose of the trailer right to line up with the box.

I hope this gives you a starting point.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Adrian T.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I have 3 months experience in Flatbed so I never really backed up anywhere.

double-quotes-end.png

You CHOSE to never back up. I’ll try to get in a couple backs every day with my flatbed just for the practice. And that is what you need-practice. At three months you should have the beginning of understanding how the trailer and tractor act and react to each other. Find a truck stop at ten am and just practice hitting empty spot.

Obviously I had to go back for truck stops and etc. All I've ever had to do in Flatbed is straight line or offset and I use that word loosely. I've never had to alley dock a flatbed and I've done a few a 45. My question was how I could get better at 45* like there was something that was missing . But thanks for the "help."

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Adrian T.'s Comment
member avatar

Errol . Thank that was exactly what I was looking for something in depth that I was lacking I appreciate it!

A lot of the time you can see across the top of your trailer. Not something you can do with a van. It really is a lot different. Did you guys take your test and learn in CDL school with a van though? I know you forget if you don't do something a lot, but don't you get the basics? For 45 I learned a pretty good method. Drive up til your shoulder is in the middle of the hole. Be perpendicular to it about 3 to 5 feet away. I have an auto man so I put it in first gear, creep mode then I don't touch the throttle. Creep up until your shoulder gets to the far side of the next spot/trailer then hard right until your tractor gets to 12:00, then hard left until you get to 9:00. STOP. Don't stop or use throttle the entire time you're moving. Now you straighten the steers and slowly back towards the hole. This will get you pretty close so just GOAL and adjust as needed. You shouldn't need many pull ups to get perfect.

Yes I learned in a dry van and I have backing knowledge . I can eventually always get the in the spot I just want to be more proficient.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Here is a backing video that I find very helpful. CR England Backing Video.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More