Stuck Between Prime Or Maverick

Topic 23347 | Page 2

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Turtle's Comment
member avatar
So how are you liking trucking life now? What kinda mileage you averaging?

I still love it as much as ever, as does the wife. It's still everything we expected it to be. However, I'm thinking of a change to local or regional , come spring or early summer. If not next year, then certainly in 2020. That's right... you heard it here first haha.

I love the OTR lifestyle without a doubt. But I find it harder and harder to leave my granddaughter after hometime. Add to that a new grandson due in Nov., and this Papa is wanting to be a little closer to home. Like Old School said above, children have to play a major factor in your decision.

Obviously I'll work with Prime to see if they can offer something to fill my needs. But that's a subject for another thread. I digress.

Mileage wise I think I'm crushing it for a flatbedder. I haven't crunched the numbers, but I gotta be averaging at least 3k a week lately. Running that many miles in addition to securement and tarping makes for a busy week.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

MightyQuinn's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

So how are you liking trucking life now? What kinda mileage you averaging?

double-quotes-end.png

I still love it as much as ever, as does the wife. It's still everything we expected it to be. However, I'm thinking of a change to local or regional , come spring or early summer. If not next year, then certainly in 2020. That's right... you heard it here first haha.

I love the OTR lifestyle without a doubt. But I find it harder and harder to leave my granddaughter after hometime. Add to that a new grandson due in Nov., and this Papa is wanting to be a little closer to home. Like Old School said above, children have to play a major factor in your decision.

Obviously I'll work with Prime to see if they can offer something to fill my needs. But that's a subject for another thread. I digress.

Mileage wise I think I'm crushing it for a flatbedder. I haven't crunched the numbers, but I gotta be averaging at least 3k a week lately. Running that many miles in addition to securement and tarping makes for a busy week.

I definitely understand you not wanting to miss out on your grandchildren. I have a 9 year old which is the reason I left the army. Think I can manage a few weeks away, but in the military it’s 12 sometimes 16 months, now that was hard. Anyways I plan on changing after I get a year in to something with more home time just feel like I need to put my time in and feel that I earned my way into trucking. You are definitely getting the miles and doing great! Are you getting anytime to stop and see any sites? If I decide to go with prime maybe we could meet up someday.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jeramy H.'s Comment
member avatar

I am currtntly in CDL school with Maverick. I did attend a week of orientation before school. That is all that I have experienced so far. If you have any questions just ask, I will answer with the limited knowledge I have so far.

I have a training diary going in the diary area of these forums. Might give some perspective of the process so far.

Both companies were on my short list as well. Both are awesome companies. For me it was the hometime that had me choose Maverick. I live about 30 miles south of Kansas City, Mavericks midwest regional was available to me which is a home most weekends account.

Tough choice for sure, both treat Veterans well (I am a Vet as well). Just find what works for you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

MightyQuinn's Comment
member avatar

I am currtntly in CDL school with Maverick. I did attend a week of orientation before school. That is all that I have experienced so far. If you have any questions just ask, I will answer with the limited knowledge I have so far.

I have a training diary going in the diary area of these forums. Might give some perspective of the process so far.

Both companies were on my short list as well. Both are awesome companies. For me it was the hometime that had me choose Maverick. I live about 30 miles south of Kansas City, Mavericks midwest regional was available to me which is a home most weekends account.

Tough choice for sure, both treat Veterans well (I am a Vet as well). Just find what works for you.

Thanks Jeremy I will definitely follow your training diary. I’m in Kentucky and within there Midwest hiring area. From what I’ve seen on here you are correct when it comes to hometime. I like the way they have training set-up for prime, like going out a couple weeks with a trainer before to test for your cdl. My question is, is how does maverick do it?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I had my cdl before I joined maverick so I'm not too sure on the details. I believe that you will go to a local college and get your cdl there, which maverick sponsors. You'll be asked to stay for a certain period of time no matter which company you go with. Both companies pay quite well and have good equipment. I went with maverick because of the home time. You say you live in KY, depending on where you live you could have really good home time. The closer to Cincinnati or Louisville the better. You will see more of the country with prime and get more miles for otr. If you do regional with maverick you'll likely stay east of I 35.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

MightyQuinn's Comment
member avatar

I live about 2 hours from Louisville

I had my cdl before I joined maverick so I'm not too sure on the details. I believe that you will go to a local college and get your cdl there, which maverick sponsors. You'll be asked to stay for a certain period of time no matter which company you go with. Both companies pay quite well and have good equipment. I went with maverick because of the home time. You say you live in KY, depending on where you live you could have really good home time. The closer to Cincinnati or Louisville the better. You will see more of the country with prime and get more miles for otr. If you do regional with maverick you'll likely stay east of I 35.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Where do you live exactly? I can get a better idea of what we have in the area

Jeramy H.'s Comment
member avatar

Maverick sponsors us through Arkansas State University Newport campus. They have a house here that you stay in for free, breakfast and lunch provided during the week. It is a 4 week program. I start week 4 tomorrow, I am testing for my CDL tomorrow. The school has been good, thet teach the permit stuff, have a range to practice the backing maneuvers, and have road instructors to take you out on the road after you get your permit on Thursday that first week.

After school I will go back to the Maverick campus for a week of securement training since I am going flatbed. Then a paid week at home to transfer my CDL to my home state. Then 21 days out with a trainer, minimum 21 days, but that training can be longer if you or the trainer feel you need additional training. Then I get my truck.

They gave us a 50 dollar prepaid card in orientation (week before CDL school) then a 520 dollar prepaid card for CDL school. Pay after school is 600 a week until you get your truck as long as you are available to work.

All has been good so far for me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Jeramy H.'s Comment
member avatar

You can check on whay Maverick has available for you by going to maverickusa.com click on hiring map then put in your zipcode. That will show you what they have for your area.

MightyQuinn's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the info man, and good luck on your test.

Maverick sponsors us through Arkansas State University Newport campus. They have a house here that you stay in for free, breakfast and lunch provided during the week. It is a 4 week program. I start week 4 tomorrow, I am testing for my CDL tomorrow. The school has been good, thet teach the permit stuff, have a range to practice the backing maneuvers, and have road instructors to take you out on the road after you get your permit on Thursday that first week.

After school I will go back to the Maverick campus for a week of securement training since I am going flatbed. Then a paid week at home to transfer my CDL to my home state. Then 21 days out with a trainer, minimum 21 days, but that training can be longer if you or the trainer feel you need additional training. Then I get my truck.

They gave us a 50 dollar prepaid card in orientation (week before CDL school) then a 520 dollar prepaid card for CDL school. Pay after school is 600 a week until you get your truck as long as you are available to work.

All has been good so far for me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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