Can I Pass The Dot Exam With My Disability

Topic 23671 | Page 1

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Noah J.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello all, I'm doing my research on weather I can pass the dot exam with my disability, I am a hard of hearing wearing cochlear implant. I walk with a cane but walk just fine. But to carry something heavy will be an issue. I am 5'0 so I'm assuming climbing in the truck could be an issue but I believe I can do it. Same goes for climbing on the trailer to strap down whatever load to be tie down. I preferred to drive automatic trucks. I wanted to see what everyone opinon on it.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

It really doesn't matter what we think. The person you should be asking is a DOT certified medical examiner. Also it's quite likely you'll have to apply for a medical waiver.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Brian's Comment
member avatar

Hi Noah welcome to the forum,

I have damaged hearing and never pass the hearing test so you should be good there.

As far as everything else goes Susan is right it will be in the opinion of whatever medical examiner you see if quality for one. Beyond that some companies like Schneider require a physical agility test but not many do that. They maybe the only one in fact not sure. Lastly, almost all big carriers are transitioning to automatic trucks. Hope that helped alittle.

Noah J.'s Comment
member avatar

Let hope the medical examiner will let me pass the exam. I have no problem signing the medical waiver if I have to. What would be the most physical work when you're on the road beside sleep?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Noah, and welcome to our forum!

One of the best things you can do at this point is do some reading in here. We've got some really great materials in here to help you get started on understanding this career. Take some time to read the following links and you will learn a lot about the trucking lifestyle.

What would be the most physical work when you're on the road beside sleep?

One of the great things about this career is the many different options available to drivers. There are jobs that involve a good deal of physical work, and there are others requiring very little exertion. Take for example a driver working in the oil fields, or maybe a food service driver, these both require a great deal of physical work. Flatbed drivers do some physical work also.

The folks who pull dry van trailers are often called "door swingers" because the most physical thing they may do in their work day is open the back doors on their trailer! But... don't let this information fool you into thinking this job is easy. Something like 95% of the folks who attempt a career in trucking never make it to the one year mark in their career.

There are many challenges to this career that tax a person's ability to cope with the lifestyle changes that come with the territory. We work long hours with very erratic schedules. We are always alone and separated from our families. We deal with inclement weather, traffic, bad road conditions, and just the constant headache of other motorists who are less than understanding of how these gentle giants of the road need extra space and time to maneuver safely among the rest of the commuters. Sleeping will be the least of your worries out here. At the end of a 14 hour work day I promise you will have no issues sleeping well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Daniel (Turtle)'s Comment
member avatar

Let hope the medical examiner will let me pass the exam. I have no problem signing the medical waiver if I have to. What would be the most physical work when you're on the road beside sleep?

Lots of good information in what most have already said.. Many companies will do many different things.. There are a few that does the Physical agility test.. There are companies that have Automatics.. I personally do not think your hearing would be any issue for any company.. And worse case scenario you might not get a 2 year Medical certificate and have to do a 1 year or smaller.. Many companies now hire and accommodate Drivers with Medical issues, loss of limbs, etc etc.. Most box trucks, and reefer units do need to be strapped in or load locked in.. Not a hard process and can normally be done on the Dock so not really climbing.. In some case you need to sweep trailers out.. Getting a step ladder and electric leaf blower helps make that easier.. Even Truck stops now have Handicap parking.. Point is, if there is a will there is a way out here to get it done and make it easier on ya..

My best advice to you tho, is if you are worried about the physical issues that can come from loading or unloading a truck.. Make sure that the company you look at has 100% no touch freight.. There are many out there that does.. They hire lumpers to load or unload the freight..

Hope this helps..

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Incidentally, you would not be signing any medical waiver. If one were required, you'd have to apply for one which would have to be approved. Eh semantics.

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