Securing Dry Van Load - Question

Topic 23684 | Page 4

Page 4 of 4 Previous Page Go To Page:
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I think we might be talking about different pieces of equipment Dave

It sounds like you're using the ones that actually fit in the slots that the the load straps also go in?

All I have are the ones with the rubber feet on either end, and I don't think you could wedge the walls apart enough by hand with those to risk anything (Sorry, I'm not trying to be contrary but I've been meaning to ask about this for a bit anyways)

It’s cute hearing door slammers talk about load securement. 😄

I'll have you know I don't slam my doors, I treat them very nicely! XD

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

I think we might be talking about different pieces of equipment Dave

It sounds like you're using the ones that actually fit in the slots that the the load straps also go in?

All I have are the ones with the rubber feet on either end, and I don't think you could wedge the walls apart enough by hand with those to risk anything

Nope, we're taking the same thing. Those bars you're using with the rubber feet on the end have a bit of a ratcheting mechanism to put pressure against the walls so that they can provide actual securement. You can certainly crank them hard enough against the walls to bust 'em if you want to.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I think we might be talking about different pieces of equipment Dave

It sounds like you're using the ones that actually fit in the slots that the the load straps also go in?

All I have are the ones with the rubber feet on either end, and I don't think you could wedge the walls apart enough by hand with those to risk anything

double-quotes-end.png

Nope, we're taking the same thing. Those bars you're using with the rubber feet on the end have a bit of a ratcheting mechanism to put pressure against the walls so that they can provide actual securement. You can certainly crank them hard enough against the walls to bust 'em if you want to.

Unless you have the cheap Harbor Freight ones.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I might have to play around with mine then... But the only loads I have to use them on are Coors and the way they load those trailers forces the wall out so far that I'm always on the last notch when I'm putting them up.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I'm always just scratching my head when drivers talk about using load locks on lightweight dry van trailers but pulling the walls in with straps first. What's the point of using both when one (straps) will do just fine.

IDK but we NEVER use load locks and are specifically told not to. Straps only and our company will give us as many as we need or want. We don't have to buy anything like that.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

In my case Susan, when we pick up Coors loads in Golden, CO, they require them to be secured, but they will sometimes have the pallets blocking a set of holes where you put straps in, and no way to get a strap around. Pallets lined flush against both walls and an airbag in the middle.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I've hauled out of Miller Coors in Golden. We simply take 2 straps and crisscross them with the upper straps hooked above and in the rails towards the front of the pallets and the lower ones hooked at the next row of strap rails past the pallets and never had a bit of trouble nor did they seem to care at all. They were satisfied there were 2 straps.

I've been there and seen drivers fussing with load locks that often won't even stay in place.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

The ones I'm talking about there can be a foot or two of empty space between my strap and my load. And with the pallets locked up against the wall there's not a way to reach any of the slots that would actually allow me to use a strap

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

I'm always just scratching my head when drivers talk about using load locks on lightweight dry van trailers but pulling the walls in with straps first. What's the point of using both when one (straps) will do just fine.

IDK but we NEVER use load locks and are specifically told not to. Straps only and our company will give us as many as we need or want. We don't have to buy anything like that.

Susan, since I switched to dry van about five months ago, I've yet to use bars on a load. But I asked the company how to do so if necessary and they told me, so I was able to answer the question. The reason one would use them AND straps would be the rare case where a product had to be secured and/or a shipper required it, but the straps couldn't be used alone because of the way the pallets were positioned.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Page 4 of 4 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More