Securing Dry Van Load - Question

Topic 23684 | Page 1

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Jamie's Comment
member avatar

How do you secure a dry van load when the load straps holes are covered up?

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
member avatar

What is it? I usually leave it, depending on what it is. If I felt I needed to secure it, I would ask the shipper to unload the last couple of pallets so I could strap it. You could also ask your fleet manager.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

You will probably use load locks, poles that will stretch out and you can set them to push against the inside walks off the trailer. They don't need holes. This system is used to hold pallets of soda/beer so you don't have a problem.

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Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
member avatar

Dry vans are to flexible for load locks unless you use a strap with them.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Dave (formerly known as K's Comment
member avatar

Dry vans are to flexible for load locks unless you use a strap with them.

Yeah, what he said.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar

I was hauling a load from Frito-Lay's, the boxes was not on pallets, just stacked from floor-to-ceiling, it was almost all the way to the back, it was one row of boxes from being to the door.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

It was most likely meant to stay that way, most companies like that are quite good at floor loading their product, and most likely it is a light load. Did the boxes go all the way to the roof of the trailer and wall to wall, left to right, if yes then you should be good with no securing of the load. Plus if it is a drop and hook at the delivery, you wont be getting any securing equipment back, so you would have to grab more at the closest OC.

I was hauling a load from Frito-Lay's, the boxes was not on pallets, just stacked from floor-to-ceiling, it was almost all the way to the back, it was one row of boxes from being to the door.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

Those Frito loads can't be secured...just forget it. if the boxes fall, they'll pick 'em up

if you have a load you're really concerned about that is stacked such that the load covers up the strap attachment points, you could put two or three straps in the first set of attachment points that can be accessed, then put load bars behind the cargo...just be careful not to crank 'em out so far that you blast the trailer apart, and whatever you do, have those straps secured first....otherwise you'll have to explain why you blew the walls off the trailer.

Certain cargo needs to be secured with blocks nailed to the floor...if that is the case, the shipper should normally do that.

I was hauling a load from Frito-Lay's, the boxes was not on pallets, just stacked from floor-to-ceiling, it was almost all the way to the back, it was one row of boxes from being to the door.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
andhe78's Comment
member avatar

I’ve got to question how strong the walls are on a dry van. Was loading skidded aluminum coils the other day next to a dry van getting loaded with the same. I had friction mats, trip chains, straps, the whole nine yards. He just shut his doors and left. Will those walls actually stop a sliding coil?

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Will those walls actually stop a sliding coil?

That answer would be no. I've seen several accidents with dry van trailers where the product (paper rolls for example) came busting through the walls.

I don't know if you paid attention to how they loaded him or not, but typically a van trailer is loaded in such a way to eliminate sliding of the product. It may be placed against the wall with subsequent skids bumped up to the last one, or they may nail blocks down to the floor that keep the product from sliding. Of course a decent driver realizes that he has to drive certain products differently than others. Paper rolls are loaded eye to the sky, but staggered so that each one is bumped up against the other and also against the wall. That keeps them from sliding as long as the driver handles the truck properly.

Just be glad you're a flat bedder. You know your loads are secured.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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