Need A Bill Of Lading Sample (Beer/Soda Bottles/cans) Please!

Topic 23768 | Page 1

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Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Weird request perhaps...

Tech. College CDL class final project requires a 2,000 mile round trip plan. My group has decided to haul Miller Coors branded beer from Milwaukee to Fort Worth where we will unload and reload with Lone Star beer made under contract by Miller Coors for Pabst. (If not 100% rational, it is close enough for project purposes so not looking to debate or change this part of the plan)...

What I can use help with is the relevant details of what a Bill of Lading would look like for such a load.

If you haul or load/unload anything like this (or packaged like this) I would appreciate the details. Looking for case counts per pallet, number of pallets which would fit on a 53' trailer, weights, etc..

Any / all help is greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Marc Lee although I do not haul beer; I’m frequently dispatched with backhauls of water and canned soft drinks (soda). Similar density as beer. Usually between 20-22 pallets make-up a load, with a weight of 45,000-46,000 pounds. Case count depends on the number and size of the individual units (cans or bottles), but is typically between 1200-1800 pieces.

So, my curiosity has gotten the best of me; BOL make-up is not usually considered with non-hazmat during trip-planning. Why do you believe it’s necessary?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Marc Lee although I do not haul beer; I’m frequently dispatched with backhauls of water and canned soft drinks (soda). Similar density as beer. Usually between 20-22 pallets make-up a load, with a weight of 45,000-46,000 pounds. Case count depends on the number and size of the individual units (cans or bottles), but is typically between 1200-1800 pieces.

So, my curiosity has gotten the best of me; BOL make-up is not usually considered with non-hazmat during trip-planning. Why do you believe it’s necessary?

Thanks G-Town.

Not sure... why a BOL. It's a project requirement.

I just try to do what my instructors ask!

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I understand...sort of.

It’s an unusual request and in all honesty and sincerity has no bearing on trip planning unless your instructor is suggesting there are special instructions on the bill or if they want to confirm an appointment time.

Not trying to be argumentative or evasive with you, but I’d ask your instructor if he or she would mind providing how to apply information found on a beer BOL as input to trip planning. It may be weight related in the event of any such restrictions along the route or the availability of a scale. If you are using a truckers Atlas any road restriction wil be indicated on the map.

Maybe one of the other Mods or Sr. Drivers has some additional thoughts on this.

Hopefully what I provided helps. BTW, the piece count I gave you was a range for the entire load, not per pallet. 20 pallets will extend to 40’, 21or 22 pallets 44’ line. A load of this weight must be scaled for both GVWC and balance. Never completely trust the weight noted in the BOL.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

I understand...sort of.

It’s an unusual request and in all honesty and sincerity has no bearing on trip planning unless your instructor is suggesting there are special instructions on the bill or if they want to confirm an appointment time.

Not trying to be argumentative or evasive with you, but I’d ask your instructor if he or she would mind providing how to apply information found on a beer BOL as input to trip planning. It may be weight related in the event of any such restrictions along the route or the availability of a scale. If you are using a truckers Atlas any road restriction wil be indicated on the map.

Maybe one of the other Mods or Sr. Drivers has some additional thoughts on this.

Hopefully what I provided helps. BTW, the piece count I gave you was a range for the entire load, not per pallet. 20 pallets will extend to 40’, 21or 22 pallets 44’ line. A load of this weight must be scaled for both GVWC and balance. Never completely trust the weight noted in the BOL.

Thanks G-Town!

Definitely helps. Dunno why he would ask for it if not required... I just assumed all loads had and/or required a BOL.

I've loaded, unloaded, stored and driven loads over the years but never as a CDL-A CMV driver.

Any suggestions on how to best phrase the question(s) to communicate limited knowledge and desire for more and to not just **** him off?

Thanks again!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Every load does need one, absokutrly.

I’ll check-in on this again later...I (think) know why they want you to have one available for this exercise.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Marc, sorry lost track of time in this thread. Although it’s still somewhat of a guess, I think they just want to familiarize students with what different Bills look like and what is relevant information to the driver.

Once you graduate and hire-on with a carrier, your trainer will cover how to handle the BOL.

If you can, let us know how this turns out. Still curious.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Marc, sorry lost track of time in this thread. Although it’s still somewhat of a guess, I think they just want to familiarize students with what different Bills look like and what is relevant information to the driver.

Once you graduate and hire-on with a carrier, your trainer will cover how to handle the BOL.

If you can, let us know how this turns out. Still curious.

Thanks G-Town.

Yeah, I think it's likely just an introduction like "Oh BTW... you need to be able to deal with things like this..." I just treat it like our filling out paper logs daily for 3 months. It's a little difference between company sponsored and technical college training!

Easy enough to do... still somewhat relevant... part of my grade... I will do it the best I can.

3.5 GPA let's me pay extra for a gold tassel!

:)

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Maybe this will help. Drivers, does this look like an actual BOL?

Coors Reverse Logistics Tool

0166949001541718220.jpg

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Other than it’s rather light in total weight,...close enough for government work. smile.gif

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