Should I Get A New Trainer?

Topic 23937 | Page 1

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Stephanie K.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, I haven't posted in a long time, but here I am on the truck with my trainer and I only have 3,000 miles left to my TNT training. My dilemma is that I still have not been taught to back this sucker up. All we do is drvie, sleep, eat and shower. She thinks I should stay on the truck past my 30,000 miles (as a delayed upgrade) to gain more experience. Which I will get 1,000.00 a WK instead of my 700.00 a week I get now. The thing is:. She is a lease operator always chasing a load and I don't really feel like I am devoting enough time to learning the other necessary aspects of my job other than the driving part. We seem to be getting alot of miles, but not alot of loads. Like PA to WA loads. There is a trainer who taught me how to do my CDL manuvers back at Prime who is willing to work with me on real world backing when I am done with my TNT. My current trainer keeps saying "we need to start backing" but it's not happening, because we always have to get the load there. Any thoughts on this would be most welcome.

P.S. Congrats to Kim and Donna. Maybe one day I will be there as well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I will tell you the same thing I told Donna. You're being played. There's no reason for you to stay on that truck. None of us knew how to back a truck when we went solo. Guess what? We were forced to learn it then, and we did. You may be uncomfortable driving backwards for the next two years. Your trainer doesn't really care if you can back it up or not. She wants you going forward and as long as you are with her, she can park the truck when it's needed.

You are going to be surprised at how much you don't know when you get your own truck. You are also going to be surprised at how quickly you'll start learning things when on your own. I loved going solo. It was as scary and nerve wracking as could be, but it did my career a world of good, and gave me a huge boost of confidence. I really started learning how to operate a truck once I cut myself loose from that trainer. You'll have a similar experience. This stuff is learned by doing it over and over. You don't learn it from your trainer and then you're golden. No, you have got to experience the sometimes painful awkward screw-ups while trying it so that your mind and muscles begin to understand how they work together to make it happen. That only takes place from continual repetitions.

By the way... it's great to hear from you again!

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Stephanie K.'s Comment
member avatar

OMG!! Thank you for validating what I already knew. She told the fleet manager I wasn't ready for my own truck because I have no confidence. I do, but she is one that teaches through humiliation and everything that goes wrong is the trainees fault. I woke up from my sleeper birth time and she had been waiting on a load assignment. Fell asleep and when I woke her up and said we got a load, but we had 90 min to get there and 100 miles to travel. She instantly called her fleet manager apologizing for not getting the message earlier because she was asleep and "Stephanie wasn't up looking at the Qualcomm.". I was so mad,but held my tongue. Everytime she screws up it is somehow my fault and if I make a mistake she flies out. I try to stay positive, nod my head alot and say how I will do better. She even wants me to fuel and wash the windows (reefer, def and tractor) in 12 min. She says she can do it in 7. I don't want to lease, I don't want to be a super trucker, I don't want to win awards, I just want to be good at my job. And it was nice hearing from you too. Thank you so much.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I completely understand. I had the same kind of trainer. He never felt good about himself unless he was making me look bad. You will be nervous as ever once you're by yourself, but that insecurity will push you to strive for improvement. Right now your trainer is taking advantage of your inexperience and benefitting from it. She is wanting you to "feel" as though you still need her. You may not "feel" ready to be on your own, but in a few short months you will be so glad you got rid of that false security.

You are ready. If you want it, Prime will provide you with some additional training in backing right there on the pad. You just need to ask for it when you get your solo truck. Stay in touch, we really get a lot of satisfaction from hearing about you guys and your success stories.

Stephanie K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks so much. The past few months have just been so overwhelming. And busy. I will keep in touch. I just woke up and now I have to drive. Be safe.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
The past few months have just been so overwhelming.

Stephanie, we understand everything you've been saying, including being overwhelmed. The introduction to this career is usually a grueling and exhausting test of our commitment. That's one of the big reasons people quit during the training portion of their first trucking job. It's a job like no other.

There are people who live for this career - they love it, and wouldn't consider doing anything else. There are also those people that I can never understand - they hate it, but it seems they just keep doing it so they always have something to complain about. Basically we have truckers who are very happy facing the daily challenges this career offers, and we have others who wake up each day just anxiously looking for another like minded trucker to commiserate with.

It sounds to me like you're doing well. You've almost completed your TNT miles, and that is a significant accomplishment - Congratulations! You'll find running a solo truck is completely different from helping a lease operator with a team operation. It will take you a while to get the hang of things, but you'll make good money, and be able to establish your own schedule of how you like to manage your time. We're looking forward to hearing more from you, and remember we're here to assist you after you go solo. Anytime you have questions, I'm sure there will be somebody in here who can help.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Of course we will help... heres an article and thread to make you laugh...read the whole thread cause i continue to humiliate myself for the greater good. lol

Nervous About Going Solo? You are NOT Alone

Mike D.'s Comment
member avatar

I just want to chime in here in just say that our moderators really are great. Some very sound advise IMO.

Stephanie K.'s Comment
member avatar

It has been wonderful advice. I am so greatful for all the help. This forum is the reason I went to Prime and decided to enter the trucking industry. I will need alot more help and advice, as I have so much more to learn. I drove 90 from Spokane WA to Blaine WA ( during daylight hours) and it was majestic. This is an incredible job to have. I feel honored to be a part of it. Becoming a top hairdresser did not come easy and neither will becoming a proficient and productive truck driver, but I believe I will be and it will all be worth it. Rainy, I have read almost all your articles, twice😍, I appreciate and learn from them and others. That is why I am still here and will never lease. Thanks again everyone. You WILL be hearing from me again, SOON. LOL. P.S. I will not be staying on this truck. Picking up a load 300 miles away and heading to TN. I have about 1500 left to my TNT training, so hopefully she will be dropping me in Springfield MO on the way.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

dancing-dog.gifdancing.gifdancing-banana.gifgood-luck.gif

glad to here you are hanging in there!!!

i did you and you can too!

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