Adventures In Stupidity

Topic 23970 | Page 3

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Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

This week's edition: loss of traction (and maybe trailer skid)!

I was heading Eastbound on US160, approximately 15 miles east of Bayfield, CO-- in the mountains but this stretch is more hilly than mountainous, in relative terms.

Road was alternating between dry spots, wet spots, and icy spots. I was coming down a hill towards a corner, empty, on my way back from a Wal-Mart store in Loveland, CO, cruising decent since I had a few miles of dry ground. I did not pay nearly enough attention and found the corner was iced over at the bottom, came around the corner and my trailer broke loose. I wove back and forth about three times just trying to keep the tractor underneath until I got traction-- I did not touch the throttle, or the brakes, just let gravity slow me down.

I got /very/ lucky in that I had: three lanes, plus a shoulder (I used about two and a half, the eastbound, and the left lane of the passing section, and part of the westbound travel lane). I also got even luckier that there was not any traffic at the corner or near, because if there had been, I would have run them over.

This is why you must always be vigilant, and build systems to do so. I've been lucky that my big mistakes have either gone unnoticed, or I scraped by without anything serious happening, but that can't be counted on. Always pay attention, and if you find you're not for some reason, it may not hurt to consider pulling over and give yourself a little mental reset. Don't be afraid to stop, or slow down, and don't get in a rush.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

This week's edition: loss of traction (and maybe trailer skid)!

I was heading Eastbound on US160, approximately 15 miles east of Bayfield, CO-- in the mountains but this stretch is more hilly than mountainous, in relative terms.

Road was alternating between dry spots, wet spots, and icy spots. I was coming down a hill towards a corner, empty, on my way back from a Wal-Mart store in Loveland, CO, cruising decent since I had a few miles of dry ground. I did not pay nearly enough attention and found the corner was iced over at the bottom, came around the corner and my trailer broke loose. I wove back and forth about three times just trying to keep the tractor underneath until I got traction-- I did not touch the throttle, or the brakes, just let gravity slow me down.

I got /very/ lucky in that I had: three lanes, plus a shoulder (I used about two and a half, the eastbound, and the left lane of the passing section, and part of the westbound travel lane). I also got even luckier that there was not any traffic at the corner or near, because if there had been, I would have run them over.

This is why you must always be vigilant, and build systems to do so. I've been lucky that my big mistakes have either gone unnoticed, or I scraped by without anything serious happening, but that can't be counted on. Always pay attention, and if you find you're not for some reason, it may not hurt to consider pulling over and give yourself a little mental reset. Don't be afraid to stop, or slow down, and don't get in a rush.

I would have needed new underwear after that, I think.

Glad you made it OK.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

So...what is the real lesson and take-away from this?

In my binary, retro-way of thinking about this; it’s a lesson in situational awareness. During the colder months, on secondary roads, especially with shaded areas, corners, dips and bumps; drop your speed. Always be prepared to safely stop.

A posted speed limit is based on “conditions permitting.” Given the same scenario, my speed would have been likely 7-10 mph slower, especially when empty in conditions like this. Preparing well in-advance for a slow turn and never going faster than my sight-line allows.

Slow down when road conditions are slippery; varying from dry, to snow covered to icy. Luck was definitely in your side this time. Please slow down.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I will, G-Town. I was talking to my trainer about this because even though I got into that spot, I'm not trying to. And he said that things like this and like when I dropped my trailer inspire a minor trace of PTSD. And it's very much the case. On an unrelated note, can you give me a link or email me that wind chart that Swift shared around?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I will, G-Town. I was talking to my trainer about this because even though I got into that spot, I'm not trying to. And he said that things like this and like when I dropped my trailer inspire a minor trace of PTSD. And it's very much the case. On an unrelated note, can you give me a link or email me that wind chart that Swift shared around?

Keith, please forgive this question, I forget, are you a Swift driver? If so, the wind chart is on the driver’s portal.

Otherwise I can email it to you. Please authorize Brett to forward your email to me in your reply and hit the red report button. Thanks.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I run for Knight currently. ^.^

Brett, it's all good if G-Town emails me.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I run for Knight currently. ^.^

Brett, it's all good if G-Town emails me.

In lieu of that, it’s on my TT profile photo gallery. I believe you can copy and past from there into a word doc.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I run for Knight currently. ^.^

Brett, it's all good if G-Town emails me.

double-quotes-end.png

In lieu of that, it’s on my TT profile photo gallery. I believe you can copy and past from there into a word doc.

I put it up on my hosting account, if anyone else wants it.

Wind Chart

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks G-Town and Grumpy

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I run for Knight currently. ^.^

Brett, it's all good if G-Town emails me.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

In lieu of that, it’s on my TT profile photo gallery. I believe you can copy and past from there into a word doc.

double-quotes-end.png

I put it up on my hosting account, if anyone else wants it.

Wind Chart

Hey thanks Grumpy.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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