Adventures In Stupidity

Topic 23970 | Page 2

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Jamie's Comment
member avatar

I learned my lesson that one day I hit a rock piller... rofl-1.gif

When I realize I'm rushing, I think about that day and slow down and double check my work to ensure it's done correctly.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Here's what I do in this situation. Oops, I've never encountered this before because I've only uncoupled/coupled once and that was during school with the instructor making sure we did it right. The next time I do it will be with my company trainer. This discussion reinforces a number of recent comments about the limitations of CDL school. I will probably start my company training next week and I know I have a LOT to learn. This is why I appreciate the OP bringing this up and all the subsequent comments. Now I'm aware of this and can hopefully do things right. All of you experienced drivers are also being trainers when you post your tips and experiences. Thanks for the time you take to help us greener than green newbies.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, the grease gets cold in the winter and the jaws don't move as easily. Dirt can also get in there and keep them from moving properly.

YES!!!! Running north all winter in both my Cascadias the locking jaws stopped working. One looked wrapped around the kingpin but the hardened grease prevented it from clasping completely. i almost dropped that trailer. the other truck jaws were prevented from.moving at all so i couldnt grasp the trailer. in both cases a pressure washing helped.

and im.not too proud to admit, i got distracted last month and pulled out dropping the trailer on my frame. i saved it, but was annoyed at myself. i know better.

great topic

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
and im.not too proud to admit, i got distracted last month and pulled out dropping the trailer on my frame. i saved it, but was annoyed at myself. i know better

At least you caught it, it makes a horrible crashing noise and gets a lot of stares when you don't.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Don's Comment
member avatar

Don't forget to disconnect your airlines and pigtail also! I started pulling away from a trailer when I saw my lines starting to look like clothes lines. Lucky for me, I look out the rear window of my day cab each time when pulling away (and backing under) from trailers, or the lines would have been ripped right off the cab. Being in a rush or getting complacent will get you in trouble every time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

I was taught LAP (Landing gear, Air lines, and Pin) for uncoupling and PAL for coupling. I was forced to follow this in school and it has become my routine. I haven't dropped a trailer or attempted to drive off with a false couple in my first year. The key is to develop a routine and then follow it every single time. It has worked for me thus far.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
Lucky for me, I look out the rear window of my day cab each time when pulling away (and backing under) from trailers, or the lines would have been ripped right off the cab.

I was picking up a backhaul about 6 months ago and seen a driver who forgot to unhook airlines and pulled away. Somehow it ripped the gladhand off the trailer and sent it through the back window on his daycab.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm just really glad I'm not the only one that's messed this up XD

Jeff J.'s Comment
member avatar

Dropping a trailer is one of the many concerns that float around in my head. We only coupled once in CDL school. I'm glad that this topic was brought up so hopefully it'll remind me when I have to do it in the future.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jeff wrote:

Dropping a trailer is one of the many concerns that float around in my head. We only coupled once in CDL school. I'm glad that this topic was brought up so hopefully it'll remind me when I have to do it in the future.

Refer back to this often and commit Juice Box’s “LAP” technique to memory.

Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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