Schneider National Apprenticeship Diary (5 Week Schneider CDL Training)

Topic 24018 | Page 2

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Matthew M.'s Comment
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Good luck buddy I’m both excited and nervous at the same time. I’m extremely worried at that pararrel parking. I already obtiained my permit with all endorsements and my dot physical. Got that stuff out of the way so all I have to worry about is pre trip and maneuvers im going to spend the next few weeks watching pre trip videos. To get a head start on that as well.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Schneider isn't a heartless company. Just let them know about your situation and maybe they can keep you fairly close to home when it's about time for your new addition to arrive.

Communication is key in this. They have freight all over the country so just let them know asap so they'll be expecting it.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Han Solo Cup (aka, Pablo)'s Comment
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Jamie T said:

I couldn't be more grateful for such an incredible opportunity. Tomorrow is my last day at my desk job also woooo.

Dude, I am so excited for you. I can't wait to say those exact same words. Good luck, study, get some sleep, and, if you can, check in ever so often. I can't wait to read your diary.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jamie T's Comment
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Hey all, so I finished my first day of Schneider's apprenticeship program today. I'd first like to thank Professor X for his Roehl training diary that's what got me on this website, and gave the idea of making a little training diary while attending this course. Although, this one won't be nearly as well written, and detailed as his was haha.

So first day is basically what you'd expect. We did a lot of paperwork and they had us all do physicals with an in-house doctor to get our DOT medical cards (this is mandatory, even if you have one already they will make you get another one). I ended up getting a 6 month, all my vitals were good and everything but since I'm a fat boi they said I'd either need to lose weight, or get a sleep test done by 6 months, so I'll just try to lose weight to avoid that, and hopefully get a longer DOT card in the future.

I also had to do Schneider's physical ability test at the highest tier due to the job possibly involving unloading freight at certain accounts. I'm doing a dedicated national flex account so I'll basically be filling in dedicated spots for people on sick leave, or vacations and so on. Like I said earlier, I'm a fat boi (340 pounds, age 25 6 foot 4 in height) and I managed to get passed all their tests. Tests involved climbing up and down a 1 foot~ tall piece of metal for a minute then they measure your heart beat and it can't exceed a certain threshold mine being 176 beats per minute. Then they had you do various bending tasks, squatting, and doing lifting weights from the floor to a table and back 10+ times up to 50 pounds. It wasn't really that bad though, just got to remember to keep breathing while doing your tasks and take your time! You're not being timed.

After all of these tasks, physical, paper work, and so on we were provided food from Schneider's cafeteria which wasn't bad. They will provide 2 meals a day while on training grounds, and a free meal at the hotel (continental breakfast). After all of this they just gave all of us work boots / shoes whichever you prefer they're oil proof, and slip proof and given with ice cleats. The rest of the day we just worked on paper daily work logs, and were told to study pre-trip when we get back to the hotel. So far so good, seems like a good program the instructor said it's a very new program as it has only been around for a few months apparently.

Anyways, I'm going to take a nap and head back tomorrow! If anyone has any questions feel free to ask, I'll be happy to answer.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Jamie T's Comment
member avatar

Hello all, I finished my second day yesterday which was pretty straight forward. Just was a crap ton of information to take in at once! We started out by meeting who our "yard instructors" would be and then they bused us into the truck yard. While out there they laid down all the ground rules such as no use of phone being the major rule. We ran through the pre-trip a couple of times which I was awful at I was really never much of a car person so I had a bit of trouble pointing out certain parts of the engine and so on. Nothing a ton of studying and hard work can't overcome though.

I definitely feel like I'm a bit behind the curb compared to most of my class, I'm in a class of 9 (including myself, some already got the boot due to various reasons). A couple of the people in my class are previous CDL class A holders, some even holding class B cdl's. A few have parents that are truckers, and one of them grew up on a farm driving a tractor. I'm as green as you can get but I don't believe that's necessarily a disadvantage. Anyways we also uncoupled / coupled the tractor, and performed a thing that I can't remember the name of at this moment... The thing where you turn off your truck / lights etc. Then repeatedly step on your brakes to release air then let it build back up and test brakes. That thing.

Our instructor also showed us the basics for backing. We will be doing backing today ourselves.

Rest of the day they had us to online homework on the laptops in the classroom which was very boring but needed.

That is all of my eventful not-so eventful day! Thank you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
JACK J.'s Comment
member avatar

I start the program with Schneider on 12/31. Interested is seeing how things are going for you.

Kyle M.'s Comment
member avatar

Good luck drivers on getting your cdl. I already have mine but have been out of the game awhile dealing with family and personal issues. Plan on starting back up at Schneider after new years maybe well see each other some day. Look forward to hearing about the rest of your training. Be safe out there

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
JACK J.'s Comment
member avatar

Any update???? are you still with Schneider????

Kyle M.'s Comment
member avatar

Any news ?

Jamie T's Comment
member avatar

Going to perform some necromancy and revive this thread. I didn't end up finishing CDL training, I was in it for 3 weeks and was about to go on the road with a trainer for 2 weeks. I realized trucking wasn't really for me though, and quit and went back home to my old job. Plus side though is I got a promotion at work 1 month after coming back. From what I took out of it, I was performing well but I couldn't really stand being away from home with my wife, and two young children at home. Not only did it effect my wife, she was getting overwhelmed having to be home by herself taking care of the kids for the 3 weeks I was gone. But myself, I thought I wouldn't mind the isolation I'm a loner myself and like to spend time alone but it's easier said than done. All I'm saying is the job is not for everyone, but the experience gave me a higher level of respect for our drivers on the road. They sacrifice there life essentially for the job. That is all, thank you!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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