Exact First Year Income. Week By Week!

Topic 2416 | Page 6

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Errol V.'s Comment
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That's it? All these recruiters garuntee $1,100 a week --- how am I going to support my wife on that? I'd make more staying home as a welder instead of going on the road. :(

Dave, I've been driving for Swift since February. I'm not at home right now so I can't get you exact figures but my biggest paychecks have grossed just over $900. Remember, this is from a rookie, so I do hope to make a bit more soon!

I've recently gotten to the point where my dispatcher trusts me enough to keep me 100% busy while I'm on the road. Not so much any more waiting time between loads.

Many companies also have bonuses for various things like mileage, MPG and such. That you would get quarterly. Ask your recruiter about that.

If a recruiter guarantees $1,100 try to get that in writing! You might hear larger numbers from an owner operator , but that is a whole 'nother ball of wax.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Matthew G.'s Comment
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2/19

Miles: 2319

Check Total: 338.25$

2/26

Miles: 949

Check Total: 452.78$

2000 Miles you make 300$ 900 Miles you make 452$

?????????????

Also, why do they keep subtracting money in these "Advances"?

Brett Aquila's Comment
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That's it? All these recruiters guarantee $1,100 a week --- how am I going to support my wife on that? I'd make more staying home as a welder instead of going on the road. :(

There's a very good chance you will indeed make more as a welder than being on the road.

I've said for a long time that I don't feel trucking is worth the money when you consider the schooling, the license you must maintain, the expectations put upon drivers, and of course the risk you're taking in a dangerous career. It's not a bad living, but if you paid drivers what they deserve I would say it should be in the $60,000 - $70,000 range. But alas, it's quite a bit lower than that for most drivers, especially that first year or two.

For me what made trucking so awesome was the travelling lifestyle. To see the entire country, meet so many interesting people, and go to fun and exciting events all over the country was priceless. And driving a big ole American Big Rig was an amazing privilege. The travelling lifestyle is something you'll hardly find in any other career. That's what made trucking so awesome for me.

So if you're just looking to make more money, trucking may not be the way to go. Especially if you have a family at home. So weigh your options carefully. Most drivers can expect:

$35,000-$40,000 your first year

$40,000-$45,000 your second year

$50,000-$55,000 is about where most drivers top out somewhere between years 3 and 5

Those are pretty safe averages. There are better paying jobs to be found but not a whole lot of em.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob S.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a lot of respect for truckers, but I am dismayed that you work for such low wages! Driving a truck is a dangerous operation, a lot of lives are at stake and the American economy would grind to a halt were it not for truckers. Also the time commitment to stay away from home for long stretches at a time must be compensated for. Why don't truckers form a union? Does anyone lobby on your behalf? Brett is right, the salary should be in the $60-$70K per year range if not more, especially for dangerous loads (i.e. gasoline, propane)

Daniel B.'s Comment
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I have a lot of respect for truckers, but I am dismayed that you work for such low wages! Driving a truck is a dangerous operation, a lot of lives are at stake and the American economy would grind to a halt were it not for truckers. Also the time commitment to stay away from home for long stretches at a time must be compensated for. Why don't truckers form a union? Does anyone lobby on your behalf? Brett is right, the salary should be in the $60-$70K per year range if not more, especially for dangerous loads (i.e. gasoline, propane)

This was 2 years ago. I make a boatload more right now than I did my first year.

smile.gif

Rob S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for your reply Daniel B.! Hope you make as much in dollars as you haul in pounds! I very much want to drive a truck but sometimes I am turned off by the paltry sums I see being quoted. Is it realistic to expect to make over $60K per year after 3-4 years of solid trucking experience? Your input is greatly appreciated.

Anchorman's Comment
member avatar

Is it realistic to expect to make over $60K per year after 3-4 years of solid trucking experience?

As Brett stated in the comment that you just replied to earlier...

$50,000-$55,000 is about where most drivers top out somewhere between years 3 and 5
Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

That's awesome! Thanks for sharing that Daniel!

I'm still pondering how to make some of these threads more prominent. I hate the idea of "sticky" threads being at the top all the time. I have "tags" here in the forum but nobody uses them and I can't keep up with them myself. We have the search engine which works pretty awesome. We also have the Trucker's Career Guide which links to a lot of forum conversations and such. But like you said, topics like "Can I take a gun on the road" or "Should I lease/buy a truck" or "What do truck drivers make their first year?" are very common questions. Maybe we need a "FAQ" section of the forum or "All Star Threads" or something?

I don't know.

Brett I think you should call it "The Real Nitty Gritty". Actual facts and numbers, rules, regulations and such. No guesses or heresay, no opinions or think so's. Just the facts.

Phil

Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

There is one thing I do not understand. What is the "Tiered Pay" thing?

A tiered pay plan is a wage system that distinguishes the salary based on time of hire and work performance. The two-tier system of wages is usually established for one of three reasons: 1) The employer wishes to better compensate more senior, ostensibly more experienced and productive workers without increasing overall wage costs; 2) The employer wishes to establish a pay for performance or merit pay wage scheme that compensates more productive employees without increasing overall wage costs; or 3) The employer wishes to reduce overall wage costs by hiring new employees at a wage less than incumbent workers.

Phil

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Brett I think you should call it "The Real Nitty Gritty". Actual facts and numbers, rules, regulations and such. No guesses or hearsay, no opinions or think so's. Just the facts.

That's pretty much what we've done with our Trucker's Wiki. We're taking all of the most important and common topics that people bring up and covering them in great detail, with constant updates anytime we get new information.

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